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Shoreline revetment question

Discussion in 'General Industry Questions' started by Orchard Ex, Mar 25, 2009.

  1. Orchard Ex

    Orchard Ex Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    1,051
    Location:
    Southern MD
    How do you hold the fabric in place under water for the first rocks for the toe?
    Gotta be a trick to it without getting wet. :)
     
  2. ddigger

    ddigger Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2009
    Messages:
    567
    Occupation:
    contractor,owner operater
    Location:
    Northern California
    Yrs ago I did a big riprap job on the coast around a C G Station. We got a hold of a hand held sticher (sewing machine) and sewed pockets in the fabric and inserted pvc pipe into the folds we made, and used the pipe to float and also guide the fabric out on the water over the toe trench, we then just carefully dumped the backing rock onto the fabric and let it sink into place. took a bit of trail and error but in the end workrd well. At low tide the toe was still nearly 12ft underwater and 24ft out. The job was done with a track mounted 880 gradall with a 8ft extention. This was in the mid 80s and after all these yrs the job still looks like we left it. So I guess it worked.
     
  3. Orchard Ex

    Orchard Ex Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    1,051
    Location:
    Southern MD
    Thanks ddigger. I ended up doing it the old fashioned way but I'll keep this idea filed away for the future. FYI - the "old fashioned way" is to hire somebody else to get cold and wet. :)