1. Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!
  2. ALL NEW MEMBERS READ THIS FIRST!! Thank you for joining Heavy Equipment Forums! If you are new to forums we communicate with "Threads", please search our threads to see if your topic may have already been answered and if not then click "Post New Thread" in the appropriate forum. This will allow all of our members to see your question and give you the best chance to be answered. After you've made a number of posts you will graduate to Full Member status where you'll see a few more privileges. Following these guidelines will help make this the best resource for heavy equipment on the net. Thanks for joining us and I hope you enjoy your stay!!

Safest Small Dozer

Discussion in 'Dozers' started by Trapper, Jul 24, 2007.

  1. Trapper

    Trapper Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    Southern USA
    Hey Guys,

    For some light to medium brush work and clearing is one brand or model safer than others? I am still trying to get the 650G deere but so far have not sealed a deal. I am referring to the one in my dozer help post. I would rather spend extra money and get a safe model for that type work considering my experience working with dozers. Thanks for all the help.


    Best regards,

    Trapper
     
  2. Ford LT-9000

    Ford LT-9000 Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    1,484
    Occupation:
    Rolling around in the dirt
    Location:
    B.C. Canada
    All dozers are the same if they rollover and you fall out your dead any way you slice it.

    You buy a dozer that fits your needs some are more user friendly than others. With most new dozers they are easier to run compared to the oldies with the foot pedals, brakes and clutch levers.

    If you go into it thinking you are going to have problems you will have problems.

    Good luck
     
  3. Dickie

    Dickie Active Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Surrey, BC
    ....or you could get a dozer that's been well maintained by a reputable shop and perhaps has ROPS or FOPS. What is your worry in terms of safety? Things falling on you? Rolling over? I don't think one brand is any better than another in terms of safety. It's more likely to come down to machine condition and, let's face it, the operator. Certainly not attempting to validate the pessimism above, but going about your work with a 'safety only' attitude will do wonders. If it doesn't look/feel/sound safe, stop and correct.
     
  4. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2003
    Messages:
    6,126
    Location:
    LaGrangeville, N.Y.
    Hi Trapper, welcome to Heavy Equipment Forums!!:drinkup

    I see you've met our resident know it all, Captain Obvious. Take what he says with a grain of salt. My feelings are you are on the right track being concerned about safety.

    In addition to what Dickie offers, I'd add get the right sized machine for the job. Accidents are more likely to happen when trying to attempt work with a smaller machine than is optimum, especially if you are unfamiliar with the work. For brush clearing you want to have a brush cage on the cab to prevent stray branches from causing injury.
     
  5. Deas Plant

    Deas Plant Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2006
    Messages:
    1,533
    Location:
    Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
    Safest small dozer.

    Hi, Trapper.
    I may be a little prejudiced but, for mine, the safest small dozer is a Cat D11R. LOL.

    From what I've seen, there is not a lot to pick between the major brands of smaller machines in terms of safety. As Dickie said, it mostly comes down to the owner of the butt in the seat. Most machine accidents are due almost entirely to mechanical failure - - - - the 'loose nut' holding the controls. If you can eliminate that loose nut and stop the machine being directed to do dumb things, you have taken a LOT of the danger out of the game.

    After that, a GOOD ROPS/FOPS is worth its weight in gold, in your case, good brush protection and having a machine that is adequate for the job are all big considerations. Machine condition and the TLC that is lavished upon it - - - or not - - - also play a large role in safety.

    Hope this helps.
     
  6. Trapper

    Trapper Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    Southern USA
    I appreciate the informative posts. I am actually in the industrial safety business, and I am just making sure that I have done my research to increase my knowledge in regards to the equipment I am thinking about purchasing and operating.

    Best regards,

    Trapper
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2007
  7. guest

    guest Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Messages:
    64
    Location:
    Texas
    Deere 650G is good a machine, I have a Case 850G similar size machine. I suggest sweeps, screens, and fire extinguisher. When pushing brush you get a lot of leaves and such build up and even though it's made of iron it will catch on fire and burn. I am one of those operators that likes to keep my machine neat and clean, but leaves and sticks get into places you can not readily get to. Since you are from the "South" I suggest A/C cab ground bees and hornets will make you leave your machine, plus sweeping brush can be a very dusty job. Work with the wind. :D and work at your own pace when you get in a hurry you usually screw up or tear up, but I am sorta laid back.
     
  8. surfer-joe

    surfer-joe Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2007
    Messages:
    1,403
    Location:
    Arizona
    The 650 Deere is a decent machine, as is the Cat D4. Not sure what the Komatsu model is in that size, never worked with one smaller than a D65. Full cab w/air conditioning will keep your operator safe and happy. I'd never run a dozer without a full cab again....with the air and all. But I'm an old fart and like my creature comforts.

    As for rollover protection, the ROPS cab or just a ROPS will keep your boy fairly safe, provided he wears his seatbelt cinched up fairly tight. Here the cab has another advantage in that it does keep the bugs and branches out. Snakes too.

    I don't think the southern part of the U.S. has a Valley Fever problem, but there may be other environmental concerns, besides dust and bugs. For example, at Stewartsville Dam in New Jersey, the intake/outflow trench was down in the rock. The rock was laced with veins of solid Asbestos. Operators would not work in that with out a full cab and new cab air filters twice a day. You may face some things like that too.

    I'm kinda like Deas tho, a D11 or bigger dozer is barely big enough for land clearing far as I'm concerned.

    Good Luck!
     
  9. stumpjumper83

    stumpjumper83 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2007
    Messages:
    1,961
    Occupation:
    Movin dirt
    Location:
    Port Allegany, pa
    woods dozers...

    If it were me, It would have to be something like a d5 or d6 with forestry package and cab, winch would not be a bad addition. I don't know if the older deere's will allow you to counter rotate the tracks, I know that the new cats can, that might be of some help when on slopes and tight conditions. I would shy away from komatsu's with the 2 post rops, might not protect you the best when your rolling down the slope.
     
  10. Trapper

    Trapper Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    Southern USA
    A D11 is just a bit outside the budget:). Thanks for all the input guys.

    Best regards,

    Trapper
     
  11. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B Administrator

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2005
    Messages:
    3,388
    Occupation:
    Digger Driver
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
  12. Trapper

    Trapper Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    Southern USA
    I can afford that size:)

    Trapper
     
  13. d6catd

    d6catd Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    california
    :usa hey guys whats up?! trapper an answer to your Q ive run alot of the cat and deere 550 and d4 and 5 machines quite a bit. depending on the thickness of your brush cleanup one of these machines will do just fine. i would probably suggest your get a newer model not nessesarily a brand new one but a newer one with hydro trans. alot easier operating wise and also you might look into slope boards for your fine tuning and small cleanup u can cut ur passes in half really handy to have well good luck man let us know what you decide
    later guys
    :usa
     
  14. Horse-trader01

    Horse-trader01 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2007
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Gulfport, Ms
    D31 Fan

    Hey I don't really know what size machine you are looking for but from scanning the previous posts it seems you are in the market for a small to medium size machine. I have been running a late 80's Komatsu D31 with good results. The machine is tough, reliable and capable of doing a reasonable amount of work without gobbling up too much cash in operating costs.

    :usa
     
  15. Countryboy

    Countryboy Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2006
    Messages:
    3,276
    Occupation:
    Load Out Tech. / Heavy Equipment Operator / Locomo
    Location:
    Georgia
    Welcome to HEF Horse-trader01! :drinkup
     
  16. wdnewman

    wdnewman Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Messages:
    43
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Clinton, MS
    A vote for Komatsu.

    Three months ago I purchased a Komatsu D21P-7 specifically for clearing small brush, young trees, fence lines, and other debris on my farm. I have just passed the 100 hour mark, and I must say I am completely satisfied with this little dude. If I had more experience as an operator, and more money in my pocket, I would have gone for the D31 Komatsu, or a D3 cat, but just could not afford them. If you are not going to push trees larger than saplings (eight inchs or so across), then I would recommend the Komatsu D21. BUT be sure that it has a four post ROPS, a good iron roof (FOPS) and sweeps installed. Also joystick controls will make the whole operation a lot easier. Just my experience and two cents worth.:)

    WD
     
  17. Bandit44

    Bandit44 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Messages:
    68
    Location:
    Mississippi
    What do you men think of the Deere 550H. I just started using one and am pleased with it, but then again I don't know squat about dozers.

    Bandit44
     
  18. nffs06

    nffs06 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Southeast
    I have a 650J LGP with a forestry package. I use it for wildfire suppression, establishing firelines, land clearing, raking/piling and just about every other forestry related service. I am very pleased with the machine.
     
  19. Countryboy

    Countryboy Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2006
    Messages:
    3,276
    Occupation:
    Load Out Tech. / Heavy Equipment Operator / Locomo
    Location:
    Georgia
    Well you know you're gonna hafta posts sme pictures now. :D