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Rollers frozen!

Discussion in 'Excavators' started by watglen, Dec 21, 2010.

  1. watglen

    watglen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
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    Occupation:
    Farmer, drainage and excavating contractor, Farm d
    Location:
    Dunnville, Ontario, Canada
    I'm thinking the mud should pretty much clean off the calcium each time you put it on. Give it a power wash in the spring. Shouldn't be too bad, and it sure makes the impossible possible.
     
  2. Deeretime

    Deeretime Senior Member

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    Sep 12, 2009
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    Occupation:
    superintendent
    Location:
    High River Alberta
    I havent ever noticed any diference on the rust end of things because like watglen said the mud takes the calcium away. not to mention it takes a couple weeks to rust through 1'' steel u/c unlike pickups and such
     
  3. watglen

    watglen Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    Farmer, drainage and excavating contractor, Farm d
    Location:
    Dunnville, Ontario, Canada
    Things are going well here. Ive gotten used to cleaning and heating and checking gear oils. Calcium is working great to keep it clean.

    One question, i did notice a small flat spot on one roller. How do we deal with that? How much of a problem is it?
     
  4. DGODGR

    DGODGR Senior Member

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    Location:
    S/W CO
    The flat spot will cause accelerated wear to the rails on the U/C. How much depends on how bad the flat spot. Even if it's pretty bad you should be OK to run until you can do repairs in the shop or after the temps get a little more reasonable.
     
  5. traxx61

    traxx61 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2011
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    Location:
    Campbell River
    sorry no easy answer, for laziness, guess its time for a tiger torch and a bar, maybe then you'll learn to clean your tracks.
     
  6. Wardiker

    Wardiker Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
    excavator owner, trencher owner
    Location:
    British Columbia
    Ouch Dude, no need for that attitude
     
  7. Sharky

    Sharky Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2008
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    Location:
    Juneau Alaska
    Been there done that a few times. Boss filled em heavily on the 235D and it took 2 of us a day and a half with jackhammers, hilti drills and flamo's to get them cleaned. Lesson Learned.

    Shovel them daily no matter what, have whoever fills them help clean them or pay the Overtime to clean them, and think when traveling through mud to avoid if possible turning and filling them heavily. Some guys (not directing to anyone imparticular) dont think about it when they churn and turn in the smag, then work till quitting time and bail as soon as the clock hits 5.

    I raise he11 when people leave my tracks full. I quit half hour early or stay late to clean then. Most bosses do not want to lose that production or pay the overtime, but its part of working in winter. Some understand it, some dont, till it's down in the shop and their really PAYING... But of course, then its the operators fault..
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2011
  8. Deeretime

    Deeretime Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    superintendent
    Location:
    High River Alberta
    I dont do it any more but my grandpa was cheap and used to hardsurface or weld the flatspot on the roller and grind it round again, it does work but probably not a great idea for a newer machine
     
  9. dirty4fun

    dirty4fun Senior Member

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    Location:
    N. IL
    I looked at a John Deere 120 C last week that was for sale, at a rental yard. They had charged the people that rented an extra $500 to clean it up. They had a few warm days to clean it but didn't do anything it was frozen to the ground. The rain and warm had melted the mud a little, then refrozen. You could hardly find the step to get up in the machine, it was so bad. I had driven two hours to look at the excavator, and the thumb had been removed, brackets torched off, and the bucket and boom pins were all loose. There was no way I was going to try and track the machine, but by then I had seen enough that I wasn't interested any more. The machine only had 3300 hours, pretty much a waste of my day.