1. Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!
  2. ALL NEW MEMBERS READ THIS FIRST!! Thank you for joining Heavy Equipment Forums! If you are new to forums we communicate with "Threads", please search our threads to see if your topic may have already been answered and if not then click "Post New Thread" in the appropriate forum. This will allow all of our members to see your question and give you the best chance to be answered. After you've made a number of posts you will graduate to Full Member status where you'll see a few more privileges. Following these guidelines will help make this the best resource for heavy equipment on the net. Thanks for joining us and I hope you enjoy your stay!!

Ratcheting or Snap Binders?

Discussion in 'Equipment Moving Questions' started by BKrois, Nov 6, 2003.

  1. BKrois

    BKrois Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2003
    Messages:
    152
    Occupation:
    Multi purpose
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Just wondering what every ones to secure machines down? The person i was working for used ratcheting chain binders. While it may be a little slower to use than a snap binder, it is a lot safer.

    Two people i know have gotten their faces hit when the snap binder didn't want to stay. One has permanent damage to his teeth while the other had his nose cracked.

    Who uses what?
     
  2. digger242j

    digger242j Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2003
    Messages:
    6,513
    Occupation:
    Self employed excavator
    Location:
    Southwestern PA
    Ratcheting.

    They may seem more time consuming, but in my experience the snap binders never get as tight as you'd like them when you first put them on. By the time you take them loose and adjust them by another link or two you can have the ratchet type all cranked down tight and be on your way.

    I assume the people you know who got hurt were using a cheater of some sort? I can see how you could get hit that way, but I have a hard time imagining why you'd have your face close enogh for the handle of the binder itself to hit you. Either way, it hurts just to think about it...
     
    DMiller likes this.
  3. wyldman

    wyldman Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2003
    Messages:
    44
    I've seen the damage those chain binders can do,quite nasty.

    I've used ratcheting straps on smaller stuff like cars,trucks,and such,but didn't know they were even rated for tying down heavy equipment.I've never seen them used for that around here anyways.
     
  4. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2003
    Messages:
    6,323
    Location:
    LaGrangeville, N.Y.
    I'm the oddball in the bunch, surprise! I use the snap binders with a cheater stick, but am very careful. When I worked at a construction company, they used the rachet style but they never seemed to last very long. They alway got run over by a machine then would be useless. The snap types seem to take a bit more abuse.
     
    DMiller likes this.
  5. donlang

    donlang Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2003
    Messages:
    46
    Occupation:
    Owner- full service excavating firm
    Location:
    North of Pittsburgh, Pa
    In my opinion, there is no other way than ratchet binders. If you secure a rubber tired machine with a snap over binder, they tend to loosen when the machine gives while underway. Ratchet binders do not come loose unless the load moves. I always try to pull in oposing directions, and have found little or no trouble. Also, heavier chains don't stretch over a period of time using ratchet binders. 3/8" as a minimum, even for skid loaders, 1/2" for bigger equipment. If you use smaller chains, you will replace them more often from them being stretched.
     
    DMiller likes this.
  6. paulsoccodato

    paulsoccodato Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Messages:
    53
    Occupation:
    contractor
    Location:
    yonkers, new york
    i use ratcheting also
     
    DMiller likes this.
  7. Dusty

    Dusty Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2003
    Messages:
    178
    Location:
    S.E PA
    ratchet binders are safer and hold tighter and are quick to tighten if they losen up on the way a few clicks and it is tight again
     
    DMiller likes this.
  8. BRL

    BRL Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2003
    Messages:
    271
    Location:
    Somerset, NJ
    My vote is for ratchet style also, though I have most often used the other ones.
     
    DMiller likes this.
  9. SteveB

    SteveB Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2003
    Messages:
    2
    Occupation:
    Telecom Technician
    Location:
    Southwest Iowa
    I use both. On the front corners I use snap binders (tighten with a cheater bar then saftey wired) and on the back corners I use the ratchet type. I've never had either set come loose while travelling so I'm either doing it right (doubtful) or lucky. I do think the ratchet type are easier to get tight the first time.
     
    old-iron-habit and DMiller like this.
  10. GeoffD

    GeoffD Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2003
    Messages:
    32
    Occupation:
    Operations Manager
    Location:
    Cumberland County Maine
    I guess i am the cowboy of the group. I use snap binders with a cheater pipe. However i don't even use safety wire, just take the slack chain, run it around the binder and call it good.

    Geoff
     
  11. DKinWA

    DKinWA Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    Messages:
    210
    Occupation:
    Biologist and Contractor
    Location:
    Western Washington
    I use the snap binders like most folks around here. I'm afraid rain and rust would take it's toll on the ratchet mechanism and cause problems down the road. I actually like the idea of the ratchet style, but I've never even seen them for sale in any of the truck shops. I didn't even know they existed until recently when I saw them in a tool catalog on the net.
     
  12. Arc Burn

    Arc Burn Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2003
    Messages:
    11
    Occupation:
    Weldor
    Location:
    Catskill Mtns NY
    For small equipment like lawn mowers and such i use snap binders but when i was in construction all we used were ratchet binders.We would pre-fab bridges inside and then tear them down and haul them out,no one ever dreamed of using a snap binder on those loads.An occasional burst of WD-40 or something of the like and we never had any rust issues and we worked year round in all weather types.I feel you can get a ratchet binder tighter than the snap binder anyways,not to mention the whole saftey factor:p
    Just my 2cents
     
  13. shaper

    shaper Charter Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    35
    Occupation:
    Golf Construction & Irrigation
    Location:
    South Portland,ME
    Ratchet binders by choice. If I haul more than one piece of equipment on a trailer I'll have to break at the snap binders
     
  14. Taylortractornu

    Taylortractornu Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2003
    Messages:
    481
    Occupation:
    Privvate landfill operator/manager
    Location:
    Iuka, Mississippi
    I use snap binders on my hoe. When i use my gooesneck trailer I have a hook that is in the front of my machine. ill bind it down super tight then go to the back and bind it down through the 2 chain holes back there and throw a nilon strap across the middle of the machine and latch it down . rarely it will be a few inches forwards. The snap Binders are a bit dangerous but i have alot of trouble with keeping the ratchet type.
     
  15. Blademan

    Blademan Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2003
    Messages:
    83
    Occupation:
    Operating Engineer
    Location:
    Calgary
    I've used both , and in my humble opinion , ratchet binders are the safest . And safety comes first and foremost for me . After many near misses , usually with a cheater bar , I switched over and can't really ever see myself going back . I've also gotten to know a few heavy haulers , and they all seem to of switched over to the ratchet type too . Years ago , the guy over at our local Bobcat dealer was actually amazed that I was securing down a rental skid steer with a snap binder . He told me the pain to his jaw was excruciating when he got smoked by a snap binder once , on the farm he grew up on . Spent two weeks in the hospital and fistfuls of cash putting his face back together . But , what it comes down to , is you do what you gotta do . You could be the safest guy on the job , only to slip on some ice and smoke your noggin . Life can be funny like that sometimes .

    Rob
     
    DMiller likes this.
  16. max diyer

    max diyer Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2005
    Messages:
    5
    Occupation:
    18-wheeler driver
    Location:
    western PA
    I have extensive experience with both types of binders. I overwhelmingly prefer ratchets. I have seen too many accidents with the snap type. The worst was when I was chaining a load down and a guy was helping me, on the other side of the trailer. We were talking and when he didn't answer, I went around and he was laying on the ground. The cheater pipe came off the binder and hit him in the face. His right face was crushed and he lost an eye.

    Shortly after that I sold all of my snap binders. I use ratchet binders or ratchet straps, exclusively!
     
    DMiller likes this.
  17. will_gurt

    will_gurt Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    Messages:
    163
    Occupation:
    operator in extended holding pattern
    Location:
    southwestern ,PA
    This is how and why the nickname skullbuster is associated with the snap binder.
     
    DMiller likes this.
  18. Cat420

    Cat420 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Messages:
    527
    Occupation:
    Construction, small engine and machine shop work
    Location:
    Pine Bush Ny
    I have seen some ratchet binders that use a detachable handle. This would not stop a determined thief, but could be used to secure tool boxes or other large objects on the job. I also prefer ratchet binders for securing loads down, they just feel so much better to me.
     
    DMiller likes this.
  19. woberlin

    woberlin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2004
    Messages:
    111
    Occupation:
    excavating contractor/bodyshop owner
    Location:
    malvern, ohio
    I too only use rachet binders to haul my secure my equipment. I have never had a problem with them rusting or not operating. An occasional shot of oil, and you should never have a problem. Thr current issue of Grading & Excavating Contractor magazine has an entire page of does and dont's for securing equipment for transport. Very informative.
     
    DMiller likes this.
  20. littledenny

    littledenny Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2004
    Messages:
    132
    Occupation:
    Owner, 2Vets, LLC
    Location:
    Ellijay, GA
    Ratcheting binders, always. I'd let all the air out of the tires and secure a load with chain only (pumping the tires up again, of course,) before I'd use a snap binder. (This is hard to do with tracked equipment, though.)

    Was a truck platoon leader in the Army years ago, saw way too many close calls with young kids trying to manhandle cheater bars and snap binders - luckily no one got busted on my watch, but boy, I sure worried about a few of them. Some of these kids needed more rocks in their pockets to even pull on a cheater bar, finally got them to get over it, and ask for assistance.

    Snap binders -- never again.
     
    DMiller and Tarhe Driver like this.