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pull lowboy with dumptruck

Discussion in 'Trailers' started by gwhammy, Jun 5, 2016.

  1. Wes J

    Wes J Senior Member

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    Depends on the state. Here in IL, we only get 34,000 on a set of tandems so most guys with an excavator on a tag trailer run 3 trailer axles. I don't think you could get a 20 ton machine to "bridge" on a tandem tag.
     
  2. gwhammy

    gwhammy Senior Member

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    missouri
    I can legal my 963 but you have to have around 15 thousand on the pintle. That's with a three axle trailer. You would have to go up in the low 20,000 pintle weight to scale on a tandem axle I would think.

    Folding neck trailers are heavy and if you don't use the fold much they will freeze. Also they are usually ground bearing and if it's soft won't lift the load so you can hookup.

    What's the green handles on top of the ball?
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2016
  3. movindirt

    movindirt Senior Member

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    Good thing we don't have many bridges around here so long as you stay to one side of the river or the other :D Seems there is only 2 private guys here in my / your area that run a 3 axle tag, most run the 30 or 35 ton single drop semi trailers. Always fun to see them turn a tight corner with a 210 hoe on the trailer with the whole thing leaning like crazy.
     
  4. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair . . . .

    gwhammy.It holds the hitch down on the ball, better picture here . . . .

    127.jpg

    Cheers.
     
  5. Queenslander

    Queenslander Senior Member

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    Tones, The only reason I have a dog trailer on my wish list is because I need to keep the ringfeder to tow a tipping trailer.
    Another option might be a tag trailer and a convertible ringfeder/ flying saucer hitch.
    I've never seen one in the flesh, how about you?

    On Edit, Looks like it is a Ringfeder/ Bartlett Ball hitch. http://www.hitchbros.com.au/GarTh_Truck_Towbar.html
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2016
  6. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    I've never seen a Bartlett ball hitch before, thanks for sharing the page Queenslander.

    There is a video on their site that shows how the combo hitch works if anyone else like me has never seen one.
     
  7. Tones

    Tones Senior Member

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    . The internet service where i'm at the mo is bad and can't open the link. Is that the type that rolls over to which ever hitch you want? If Iv'e never seen one but have seen plenty of Bartlett balls on dog trailers.
    In Melbourne many years ago there where outfits with a very high goose neck trailers that the tail door of the bin could pass under. the bin had a ball bolted to the floor . To couple just swing the tail door open, back the truck onto the coupling, connect ,close the door and go. Looked as ugly as sin but guess it worked well. All the air and hydraulics where the same as for dog trailers
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2016
  8. digger doug

    digger doug Senior Member

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    Here ya goes...:
    http://www.rogerstrailers.com/

    They are local to me. Note when loaded up, and attached (ready to roll) the deck is about 18"-20" off the ground.
    (and the bottom is about 5".....they do have problems with railroad crossing's getting stuck sometimes.)
     
  9. gwhammy

    gwhammy Senior Member

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    You see a lot of drop decks around here with detach. I've watched them when they see a crossing or something it will drag on you can watch the smoke roll as they get enough speed up to drag across them. See the scrape marks all the time.
     
  10. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair . . .

    Gotcha digger doug. It seems to me the art of the U.S. trailer manufacturers is in building low clearance units to comply with regulations . . . I would hate to have to pull something with five inches clearance.

    It seems though that the need is not universal for here is one U.S. manufacturer making a standard type of tag with ramps . . . same 8degree system is available on their 30 ton lowboy and my question is why would you use a detachable in preference to simple ramps like this.

    In no way am I trying to be argumentative . . . just curious.

    Hyd.Bi-Fold3.jpg

    Cheers.
     
  11. Birken Vogt

    Birken Vogt Charter Member

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    It seems to me that the real heavy trailers, Murray and Cozad around here anyway, are designed to shave every inch of height and every ounce of weight.

    The convenience of hydraulic this and that is not really convenience if you have to pull the blade off the machine to make weight.

    Driving up those nice 8 degree ramps on top of that thing is no longer any fun if you have to remove the ROPS to get under bridges.
     
  12. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    I'm the same way Scrub . We split the difference on the old 10' wide float . It was a double drop that sat pretty low to the ground ( 6 " clearance ) .

    To make it work in our environment cut the vertical beams short on the goose neck . Looks a little strange as it sits higher in the front than rear . No high center road issues with it .
    https://www.heavyequipmentforums.co...ozad-trailer-s&p=162605&viewfull=1#post162605

    https://www.heavyequipmentforums.com/showthread.php?12004-Structural-moving
     
  13. movindirt

    movindirt Senior Member

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    Most all the private guys in my area run these trailers, they are always moving and so they don't want to take the time to split the trailer everytime, and for a 20 ton hoe they work fine. Take routes to avoid the bridges and you'll be fine.

    9188204.jpg

    Most all of them run them without ramps, including me. Saves your back and with a excavator you can jump on and off without any issues. That said I'd like to have a lowboy because climbing on that 36" tall deck when its slick gets sketchy :pointhead :D Its fun to watch guys back 953's up on these old short single drop trailers that are 8' wide. :drinkup
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2016
  14. digger doug

    digger doug Senior Member

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    Yes, the number I always remember is 13' 6".

    I did a foundation drawing once for a used Bullard Vertical lathe that was 14' 5" tall.

    It came down from Buffalo one day in one piece on a lowboy. (much to my surprise)
    IIRC it was 60k lbs, and over the 102" width as well.

    With it on the trailer, I measured just about 5" clearance, 18" of floor, and then the 14' 6" of machine.

    So being overweight, over width, and over height, it had an escort and took 5 hours to travel the 100 miles.

    You'll note on my linked company, they offer a "well" between the rear wheels, to further tuck the boom of
    a large excavator down lower.

    Pulling with low clearance....these are popular around here:
    http://www.roadtrafficsigns.com/Clearance-Sign/Railroad-Low-Ground-Clearance-Sign/SKU-X-W10-5.aspx
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2016
  15. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair . . .

    Thanks fellers. Its a whole different environment you work in.

    Cheers.
     
  16. lantraxco

    lantraxco Senior Member

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    "Twelve foot six, it said on the sign, and those chickens were stacked to thirteen nine!"

    It's horses for courses, you have to buy your trailer, if it's just the one, to haul the biggest, heaviest, ugliest, most helpless load you can think you will ever possibly haul, keeping it more or less legal and squeezing through under bridges and overpasses, through tunnels, and over bridges built in the 50's and 60's designed for the occasional 80,000 pound freight truck. Then at the end of the haul tug it all up a grade so steep you need a nine as a helper on the last mile. That's heavy haul, lol.
     
  17. JoshA

    JoshA Well-Known Member

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    Alberta, Canada
    Those are referred to as scissorneck trailers here, folding neck as well. Like gwhammy said, they are a staple in the oil field. You can haul a dozer on them to site, then turn around and drag a shack up the back, and put a pick-up truck on the neck.

    I have two equipment trailers, a 53+ft scissor neck and a ~30ft lowboy. Started with the old lowboy, kept it when i got the scissor neck since i thought the short trailer would be handy for city work, but to be honest I rarely use it now. (My pictures below)

    $_27.JPG
    $_27.JPG


    Honestly, just running up the ramps is nice, when conditions are good. Saves a lot of time over the back compared to the front. But climbing up in the winter with snow-packed tracks, or even mud, can be pretty treacherous. There's a reason we see so many machines on their side next to trailers, especially dozers. Killed or disabled people in the process.

    I've walked my hoe up the neck of my trailer, carrying a hoe-pack on a chain, phone in one hand coffee in the other, dead of winter, not a care in the world. Not the same scenario up the back of my trailers!!


     
  18. Queenslander

    Queenslander Senior Member

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    Your long trailer would be right at home here JoshA, the truck even has a bullbar... don't see too many of those outside Oz.
    Or do you call them moosebars?
     
  19. clintm

    clintm Senior Member

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    55ton 26'deck drop side detachable was pushing 13'6" tall 1,300 miles if I didn't have a drop side It would have been over height.
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 9, 2016
  20. RBMcCloskey

    RBMcCloskey Senior Member

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    It was common in NJ before WWII to pull a lowbed trailer attached to a dolly hitched to a heavy single axel dumptruck. Theses were small local contractors and could not afford the luxury of having a single purpose truck.

    Also keep in mind that the equipment was small, Caterpillar D4 and D6 size bulldozers, 1/2 cy to 3/4cy shovels, backhoes and cranes, 1 1/2 cy to 2 cy loaders, maybe a Caterpillar 12 grader and a 10 ton three wheel roller. Most of the equipment was 20 tons and less and slow speeds.

    My family had these set ups until about 1920 in Hudson County NJ, they were pulled by Mack AC chain drive dumptrucks, the area was small and the speeds where 10 to 20 mph, (down hill with a strong tail wind). My Grandfather told me stopping was the biggest issue, not speed.

    They were very large paving contractors at the time and bought tractor trailers in the early 1920's.