1. Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!
  2. ALL NEW MEMBERS READ THIS FIRST!! Thank you for joining Heavy Equipment Forums! If you are new to forums we communicate with "Threads", please search our threads to see if your topic may have already been answered and if not then click "Post New Thread" in the appropriate forum. This will allow all of our members to see your question and give you the best chance to be answered. After you've made a number of posts you will graduate to Full Member status where you'll see a few more privileges. Following these guidelines will help make this the best resource for heavy equipment on the net. Thanks for joining us and I hope you enjoy your stay!!

Pins and bushings on 310 L backhoe rear arm, cylinders to move side to side.

Discussion in 'Tractor/Loader/Backhoes' started by emmett518, Jul 3, 2022.

  1. emmett518

    emmett518 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2021
    Messages:
    740
    Location:
    USA
    There is a lot of play in the pins that connect the hydraulic cylinders that move the rear backhoe arm side to side on the arm side. Following the advice of the Deere dealer, I extended out the backhoe arm, and was able to see a lot of play in those pins. The two, center pivot joints on the swing arm look tight. The Deere dealer suggested that the tractor side pins rarely get nasty as they are much larger than the ones on the arm side.

    Removing the pins and bushings and replacing same, is that something that i can do if I have intermediate shop skills? What tools do I need to remove the pins and bushings? Do I need to get someone with a stick welder to run a bead down the inside of the bushing to shrink it out? I don't want to damage the swing arm (Deere says that is a $9000 part), nor do I want to get into a nasty situation with a job that is over my head.

    We are a rescue farm that doesn't have a ton of money, so saving the travel fee, and shop time would be helpful.

    Thanks
     
    DMiller likes this.
  2. JL Sargent

    JL Sargent Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2018
    Messages:
    778
    Location:
    Alabama
    Unless you are digging next to underground power or fiber optic cable all day, does it really matter about looseness in the swing pins? Keep it all greased regularly and use it.
     
    DMiller likes this.
  3. emmett518

    emmett518 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2021
    Messages:
    740
    Location:
    USA
    My yard is very tight, so it’s way too easy to hit stuff if I am not careful. Second, I worry about the problem getting worse and damaging the $9000 swing arm.
     
    DMiller likes this.
  4. Willie B

    Willie B Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2016
    Messages:
    3,489
    Occupation:
    Electrician
    Location:
    Mount Tabor VT
    I've never done swing cylinder bushings on your tractor. Where is the friction? If pin is stationary in relation to the swing fixture, but friction surface is in the eye of the cylinder, it's an easier job.
    Be very thorough with supporting the eye of the cylinder, don't want to damage it while trying to fix it.
    Removing the old bushing is straightforward. weld inside it, or heat with oxy/acetylene. Let it cool. Use a homemade drift to get it out, I like an appropriately sized socket.
    Installing new will frustrate a very experienced mechanic. Properly sized, the bushing is slightly bigger than the bore it fits inside. I've used upside down canned air, dry ice. Neither works easily. Liquid nitrogen is best. It's hard to find. You need a dewar, a thermos made for it. I've heard liquid nitrogen boils at near -200 F. Elsewhere, somebody claimed -300 F. This shrinks the bushing hopefully enough to slip in with reasonable force. This cold, steel is fragile, prone to breaking. Wear eye protection & use a driver that will cushion shock. I use the old bushing that has been heated red to make it less brittle.

    I think if you're going to do it once in a lifetime, better to pay a professional.
     
    emmett518 and DMiller like this.
  5. Tinkerer

    Tinkerer Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2009
    Messages:
    8,271
    Location:
    The shore of the illinois river USA
    It isn't a job an ameteur should do.
    Especially if you don't have a welder and/or a cutting torch.
    IF you are successful removing the old bushings, you will be screwed if one of the bushings seizes in the rod eye part way in.
    If you don't want to take the machine to dealer, remove the cylinders and let a professional do the R&R. IMHO.
     
  6. hosspuller

    hosspuller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,805
    Location:
    North Carolina
    According to Deere parts. the pins don't rotate in the swing frame. So the bushings are in the rod eye. Removing the cylinders are doable by the DIY. Then they can be put in a press to remove & install the bushings. Or a hollow hydraulic cylinder to to the job while on the machine.
     
  7. JL Sargent

    JL Sargent Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2018
    Messages:
    778
    Location:
    Alabama
    Also, the looseness can be found in the parts of the frame that don't rotate or have bushings.
     
  8. Willie B

    Willie B Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2016
    Messages:
    3,489
    Occupation:
    Electrician
    Location:
    Mount Tabor VT
    In my experience, at home cylinder work where holding is needed is best done on the machine. Many cylinders can leave one end secured. In this case, hydraulic hoses are left intact.
    Removal of old bushings are a 1 hour job for an experienced mechanic.
    Shrinking new bushings to fit the bore is VERY challenging. I believe liquid nitrogen is absolutely needed. Liquid nitrogen is not a simple commodity to get, unless you are very close to a supplier, or an artificial breeder. Breeders (in some cases farmers) use liquid nitrogen to keep bull semen inactive. They have three gallon containers refilled periodically containing the stuff we need. These containers might protect $10,000 value of semen. Their supplier doesn't call ahead, he refills the thermos when he sees fit.
    I do not possess the brass to ask a friend to risk running out of cold as a favor to me.
    I've explored the process of buying liquid nitrogen. It seems VERY expensive! Only would it be worthwhile if one were a frequent user.
     
  9. jimg984

    jimg984 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2009
    Messages:
    606
    Location:
    ronda north carolina
    can remove some of side to side, shim with large washer from EBAY
     
  10. emmett518

    emmett518 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2021
    Messages:
    740
    Location:
    USA
    I think a good possible compromise would be for me to push out the pin, remove the cylinder and let the dealer do the bushings.
     
    Tinkerer likes this.
  11. hosspuller

    hosspuller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,805
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Removing the cylinder is heavy in an awkward location. depending on the age and condition, consider doing the cylinder seals while it's out.

    Get some caps & plugs for the hydraulic lines before attempting the job. It'll save making a mess and expensive Hy-gard oil.
     
    randy448, emmett518 and T-town like this.