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Past History

Discussion in 'Cranes' started by DMiller, Jun 24, 2019.

  1. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    These were at the Nuke when I was working there some years back. Just thought they would interest y'all.

    Biggest mother I had ever seen.
    OSG & Turb 253.jpg
    This is the Polar Crane in the Can and a Little Liebherr they put thru the building side hatch.
    OSG & Turb 009.jpg
     
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  2. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    They were changing these monsters out 4 at 744,000lb.
    DSCN5888.JPG
    DSCN5900.JPG each.
     
  3. wornout wrench

    wornout wrench Senior Member

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    I never got a picture of it but when they were building a windfarm in my part of the world they had a massive crane there.

    I was up in the area doing some maintenance on some equipment. They had the boom down to repair the blinky light on the top so the planes didn't fly into it.
    They had the boom pretty much laid down on the road so no getting through.

    So just sitting there and the crane op yells at me, wants to know if I had a light. I'm a non smoker but I did have my handy dandy pocket butane torch for heat shrink with me.

    I went over to light his smoke up and that was when I realized just how freaking big the crane was.

    I think I might have caught a few flies because my mouth was hanging open.

    Pretty cool.

    If I remember correctly it took 50 trucks/trailers to move it.

    Love the pictures, got anymore?
     
  4. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Was a five axle Liebherr 100 tonner they stuffed thru the Can equipment hatch. They used it to set and retrieve the lifting equipment from on top of the Polar Crane. The Polar crane was rated at 500T when originally installed, derated to 350 once in service routine. The crane could pick and swing 360 degrees from anywhere within the Can and drop to anywhere within the can.

    They brought this monster in on Several truckloads, 600T unit.
     
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  5. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    RSG Cranes 001.jpg RSG Cranes 005.jpg RSG Cranes 006.jpg RSG Cranes 017.jpg

    Used the Mani to assemble the Demag. The 100 tonner before it got sent in.
     
  6. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    The hatch is a mechanism all unto itself. The slide affair they used to slip the machines into the 'Can' was as well.
    RSG Cranes 011.jpg RSG Cranes 012.jpg RSG Cranes 020.jpg RSG Cranes 021.jpg
     
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  7. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    Thank you for sharing DMiller - interesting pics. I've never been around that scale of heavy construction.
     
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  8. Vetech63

    Vetech63 Senior Member

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    4600 Manitowoc is the biggest I have assisted in assembling and repair but they were draglines. Those look much bigger.
     
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  9. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Saw a lot of Inventive methods of building and repairing machines working there. They replaced the main condensers(Three stories tall) as Units, built them in the yard and trucked then slid them in after they slid the old ones out. Everything Massive, hard to get at or remove reinstall. A lot of old Millwright tricks taught across the floor by old hands. The turbine was another monster and it sat with a .004 critical dimension across the length when they set it. One million shaft HP at 1600rpm, just at critical mass. This is one of three Low Pressure Turbines and the layout of the Turbine floor I worked when at power. 140T LP rotors(3), 160 T generator Armature.
    DSC01401.JPG DSC01403.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2019
  10. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    The smaller turbine closest is the High Pressure unit, the exhaust from it is ducted to the other three.
    That LP turbine is on a shipyard lathe sent up from N'awlens, they had set the turbine down on bad saddles, made a 'Indication' on a bearing surface .003x 3" that had to be removed.
     
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  11. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Some days I miss the work I performed, the noises, smells, the machine alive. Other days I peer into my archived photos and remember the heat, the cold, the workload, the messes and outages where could not BEG me back in there.
    Being in the 'Can' during outage time when work was happening was different, being basically locked inside a concrete cocoon with no facilities for hours on end and trying NOT to get contaminacrappedup with radiologic hot material was difficult. We would have to climb fixed supports in some spots to hang Workman's Protection, isolate some systems, return systems to service, just a major pain wearing protective clothing. Any and everything we worked around in the Reactor and Auxiliary buildings had hot particles, radioactive corrosion sediments, always a test of patience as to getting a job done and not spreading the crap all over. Had a couple bad spots, one we called the Bowling alley, reach rod operated actuators for radiation levels that we had to enter on occasion, had to climb thru over and around to get to flanged drain points to remove the flanges and install drain rigs, always leaked by always nasty and always heat hot as was for a heat exchanger system. Sweat like on fire, double gloves double boot covers, double PCs and sometimes plastic over clothing over that all in 98-120 degree heat and confined area. Radiation Protection(RP) Personnel would be steady yelling to get done and get out.
     
  12. Tugger2

    Tugger2 Senior Member

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    I went to rent a specific sized small diesel hammer years ago, The rental sales guy said the only one he had was out at Hanford driving piles inside some sort of containment tent . He was unsure whether it and even the crane would come back back or be buried on site somewhere. I take my hat off to you men who work in those places.
     
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  13. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    The Liebherr they stuck into the can was not dressed for the game, had surface contaminates ALL Over when came out, lost the air cleaner, the cab ac hoods and filters, three of ten tires and misc. other stuff before got clean enough to free release to the street. Much of it just took time to decay off, was like a Zoomie(radioactive particles official speak) magnet! Had one old boy we could NOT allow into the reactor building, all he had to do was walk in and was crapped up, just amazing!! and another Zoomie Magnet. BTW Zoomies do not cross the ropes and plastic sheeting according to the RP Techs, is like a barrier wall!!!! We ALL Laughed at that joke!!
    Also had three guys I worked with, scared to death of Electric, Radiation and Heights, do not know HTH they managed to get their jobs.

    Ugliest incident I saw a guy came out of jumping the old generators(Had to go INSIDE the radioactive side to set machinery for inspections) he had Red Duct tape on three spots and set off every rad monitor on the way out of the buildings, removed the tape in sensitive regions like big bandaids to capture the particles, had to shave his butt where they put a SS Mirror on the floor and handed him a Bic Disposable with liquid soap. Got clean but bloodied. One particle was so hot they had to enclose it in a lead pouch to ship it away for ID, was so small as to be almost invisible. Set off rad monitors some fifteen feet away from it so suspicion was a piece of failed fuel assembly(had six over life of plant).

    Hanford was a mess, old breeder reactors for plutonium weapons materials, has been said by workers that were there the hot stuff was EVERYWHERE, but had decayed to low enough levels to not be an issue.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2019
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  14. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Coolest pics I ever got was of the core as was being offloaded. This is 62 feet UNDER water to top of the assemblies and on a camera we had access to the Closed Circuit TV of, the Vessel is 16 feet across and 7" thick. Each assembly was 10"x10" and 14 feet long, could handle them by hand when new. Used a five ton electric trolley hoist to unload them from Transport containers and into the fuel pool, hanging on a 250T bridge crane, I got pretty good with the controls on that where got volunteered to run it when we received fuel. SOFT touch sensitive controls.
    001.JPG 002.JPG IMG_0058.JPG
     
  15. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    IMG_0055.JPG IMG_0056.JPG IMG_0057.JPG

    Top of a assembly never cleared 18 feet below water level after put in the Pool.
     
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  16. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Center pic above, I had a stick on the hook awaiting the slugs on the bridge to come guide it into the elevator basket beneath it(On the right edge). Fuel handling was relatable to hanging a twenty pound plumb bob off a 750 Holmes operated remotely and dropping that PB into a slightly enlarged PB sized pipe twenty feet below grade in a wind. ALWAYS a flowing current in the cooling pool, worst along edges of the pool.
     
  17. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    The prettiest an probably the most deadly blue color in all the world.

    It's kind of the funny about the differences between naval and civilian nuke power. Cameras were never allowed in the engine rooms except for official business. No blue glow to be seen anywhere. The reactor vessel is totally sealed with just a small bulls eye to look through. Reactor coolant is totally separate from work steam. Reactor coolant goes through a steam generator which makes the stuff that runs the ship. Refueling means the ship goes into the yards and gets lots of holes cut down the center of the ship for access to the reactor vessel. Scheduled refuels were once every twenty years. I've seen the outsides of the HP turbine and low pressure turbines. The distilling plant was on top of the HP turbine and it was a hot place to stand watch on.

    Thanks for the tour of a world very few get to look at!
     
  18. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    MUCH Lower enrichment fuel, ours ran 3.5-4.5% enriched uranium, all those tubes in a assembly and a great deal of it inert Ceramic. Only good for 17+/- months at full power, playing with power levels just made the systems ANGRY, VERY ANGRY!! RF came every 18 months. We had a Demin water plant, generated around 20,000gal a day, used EVERYWHERE reactor or steam side.. Out of 193 assemblies replaced 90-96 of them each refuel then reorganized the pot load to scatter the heat load. Cherenkov Glow, basically so active radiologically the released radioactive particles moving greater than light speed would temporarily activate the water and light it up. Our was a bolted down lid, all the small circles are Stud hole seals for the filled refueling cavity that got drained off as the head was reset. Head weighed 167 Tons with all the control rod drives on it. This is when our replacement head came in, Neutron Embrittlement and a issue with 600 Alloy SS Welds in the old head brought this on. The White ring line is the Base of that head, 18" thick.
    IMG_0287.JPG IMG_0288.JPG

    Nuke is a world unto itself, a rapidly changing ageing, maybe dying industry.
     
  19. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    We (myself a Reactor operator and a Fuel engineer) worked up the Radiation levels on a fuel assembly been thru 18 month cycle. Figured as a estimate of 16 to the 14 power Rads, not roentgen not REM but Rads of radiation. Enough to stand a used assembly in the center of One acre, you could start at a corner and be dead at a dead run before you got within 20 feet of it, could not ever manage to touch the used assembly. Was enough in the pool when they mapped the assembly numbers and verified them with stick held cameras at one foot above the assemblies the cameras would burn out in around 75 minutes.
     
  20. Mother Deuce

    Mother Deuce Senior Member

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    Oh good now you tell me... probably explains the tail!