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on operating a dozer

Discussion in 'Dozers' started by noah, Apr 16, 2010.

  1. noah

    noah Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2009
    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    ohio
    Been running small dozers on and off for 30 yrs.On Residential jobs. D3, case,John deere. Pretty good operator not the best by no means. Had a job offer the other day to run a D8 for a couple weeks. They will not show me how to run it i am suppose to know how. I turned down the job. I am sure i can run it but for pure embarassment i turned it down. This is on a commercial job site pushing dirt no finish work. My question is how hard or how complicated are the big dozers to operate. Or my experience on small dozers would be enough to let me get right in to it. Good choice or not.
     
  2. DPete

    DPete Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2007
    Messages:
    1,677
    Location:
    Central Ca.
    Easier than small because they have longer tracks. What model D8 ? I would do it if you can.
     
  3. upnover

    upnover Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    123
    Occupation:
    Consultant
    Location:
    British Columbia
    Go for it.....whats the worst that can happen... They tell you to get another job. At least you have run a dozer before, you'll know which end of the machine to push with! Everyone started somewhere with 0 hours. Who knows maybe another guy on the job will coach you.
     
  4. D6c10K

    D6c10K Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2008
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    677
    Location:
    Iowa, USA
    They offer you a job and won't so much as show you how to start the machine? :crazy I'm alway amazed at the arrogance of some people....you'd think they they'd at least want to be sure you knew how to do the maintenance checks.

    That said, if you'd like to run a larger machine I'd do it just for the experience. You might find you know more than some of them anyway, and if they're a pain to work for, then dump them.
     
  5. FurakawaMatt

    FurakawaMatt Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2009
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    169
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Good choice! Every make of equipment seems to use different controls. There is always a learning curve. Those places that do not take the time to train people (Regardless of previous experience and background) are most likely dangerous places to work for. I think it is the interchangeable people mindset.

    As for embarrassment, Why? Now if you had taken the job by misleading about your experience, that could prove embarrassing.
     
  6. Crawler Hawler

    Crawler Hawler Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    32
    Occupation:
    HEO, Drill&Boom
    Location:
    Kern County
    I agree with the above post, but I'm thinking you may have lost out on a good opportunity, How big was the construction site?? Would you be in an area away from others where you could learn and get the feel for the size of that machine?

    With the wealth of info here and on youtube, internet etc...I'm sure you could find some operational instruction for that particular cat model, along with maintenance info, that way you won't look like a dummy.

    But that being said, if your unsure about it you made the best choice!
     
  7. qball

    qball Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2007
    Messages:
    1,072
    Occupation:
    local 150 operator
    Location:
    il
    buddy, if you can run a little one well, a biggun is no sweat.
     
  8. alandownunder

    alandownunder Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2010
    Messages:
    13
    Occupation:
    farmer
    Location:
    longwood vic australia
    had the same thing happen to me,a month ago small earth moving company needed a driver for late model hitachi 175hp dozer for 20 machine hours, like yourself only operated old machines and told the owner so . he said he would stick around for a hour or two and see how i would go 15 minutes later came over and said he could see i had afeel for dozers and left me to it. incredible machine for ripping and stock piling amazing climbing ability with full blade of gravel clay mix. the only problem encounted was levelling on top of stack, all the controls operated from left hand.
     
  9. Heimy

    Heimy Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
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    Location:
    Pa
    i would have hire you for being honest and went from there. i get guys all the time that kept telling me 2o years exp. and can run everything but couldn't keep up with my 10 year old daughter. JMO.
     
  10. Digga Dave

    Digga Dave Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2009
    Messages:
    38
    Occupation:
    Senior operator - Local Government
    Location:
    Australia
    I agree with Heimy and would have done the same!

    I have found in my short 18yrs experience with earthmoving equipment that

    "The bigger it is, the easier it is to operate".
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2010
  11. pinesd3400

    pinesd3400 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2009
    Messages:
    136
    Occupation:
    anything to bay the bills
    Location:
    no. dighton, mass
    We all love the honest

    I just feel that nowadays a second chance is getting rare. Years ago I
    faced the same problem, but the only thing at that time i know about was
    a TD9 gear job no tilt had to put feet on dash to steer it. I went for it
    and sat in a new world. A fairly new TD25. Tilt blade power steering,
    power shift, ripper and A ROOF. The biggest problem I had was when the
    job ended. Beleive me it wont take you long with a D8. You will have to
    get over the thrill of it. I pushed piles 65 feet in the clouds , I destumped
    acres with it. Good size stumps pop out like twigs. Then I guess all things
    come to an end. After that I could NOT run that old TD9. It goes like
    I run the backhoe for years and took the big plung an excavator. I get in
    my backhoe now and its like "you gotta be kidding" The only thing I
    caution is you will be spoiled. Bigger is better and much more foregiving.
    sam:usa
     
  12. plantman.uk

    plantman.uk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    201
    Occupation:
    excavator operator
    Location:
    uk
    if you can operate a small dozer the big'un' is the same. d8 nice bit of kit.if it makes you feel better guy everyone has to start somewhere and if all you are doing is stockpiling don't worry about it once you start pushing you will so get the hang of it and after all it's only a stockpile but seal it to keep the water out.Why don't they wanna show ya?...just remember one thing....those that can.do.....those that can't criticise. all they can do is give you the 'run' they can't take your hands off....good luck
     
  13. Dirtdozer

    Dirtdozer Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Messages:
    35
    Occupation:
    commercial and residential Grading Contractor
    Location:
    Greenwood, sc
    For me it is a night and day difference between the two. Most of the work we do requires a D7 and up then going to a D4 for finish grade. I hate this less power, speed and smaller pushes.
     
  14. BC BOY

    BC BOY Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2010
    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    B.C Canada
    There loss,after the first day you would have had no problem. seems like they are a strange outfit anyway.
     
  15. diggerman57

    diggerman57 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2009
    Messages:
    57
    Occupation:
    heavy equipment operator
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    I was always told to never turn down a job. So, even if I wasn't familiar with a particular machine I just went slowly, and carefully until I figured it out. The worst that can happen is being told that you're not working out. But, maybe someone could take a liking to you and keep you around. If you have 30 years of (on and off) small dozer experience, it won't take you long to figure it out. If you're still unsure about going in feet first, ask your perspective employer if you can check the machine out at the end of the work day to familiarize yourself with it. YOU CAN DO IT, JUST TRY!
     
  16. carogator

    carogator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2009
    Messages:
    232
    Location:
    south carolina
    Like most said, if they didn't want to show you what to do, then it ma not be a safe job. But!! Maybe, just Maybe, they didn't want to embarrass themselves because they didn't know what to show you. They may not have been able to do it! Just saying.
     
  17. Wolf

    Wolf Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2006
    Messages:
    1,203
    Location:
    California
    Noah:

    So what happened? Did you take the job? Are you a pro at the D8 now? Give us the rest of the story . . .
     
  18. noah

    noah Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2009
    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    ohio
    Thanks for all of the help. Took a job with a other contractor running trackhoe installing catchbasins and pipe.
     
  19. Burnout

    Burnout Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,442
    Occupation:
    Operator at Sureway Construction
    Location:
    Edmonton AB
    The bigger dozers are quite a bit easier to run. For the longest time a 6 was the largest I had ever run. When I came to this company I was offered a couple days in a 10N. I asked the operator what I needed to know, he said they are all the same. 2spds forward, 2 spds reverse. His biggest piece of advice was shovel the tracks or he'll be after me.

    If your wondering about the 2spds..... wehave 3rd locked out in many of our dozers.

    It also seems appropriate for a shameless video plyg on the controls of a D8 :Cowboy

    YouTube - Caterpillar D8T Operators Station
     
  20. Kman9090

    Kman9090 Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2010
    Messages:
    273
    Location:
    Everywhere
    Pushing dirt is easy if you've been a finich man. Make sure the blade is full and your golden. Pushing downhill always helps to get a big blade full stop halfway then backup get another blade full. pushing twice the dirt, but only works on steeper hills.