1. Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!
  2. ALL NEW MEMBERS READ THIS FIRST!! Thank you for joining Heavy Equipment Forums! If you are new to forums we communicate with "Threads", please search our threads to see if your topic may have already been answered and if not then click "Post New Thread" in the appropriate forum. This will allow all of our members to see your question and give you the best chance to be answered. After you've made a number of posts you will graduate to Full Member status where you'll see a few more privileges. Following these guidelines will help make this the best resource for heavy equipment on the net. Thanks for joining us and I hope you enjoy your stay!!

Old conventionals at work

Discussion in 'Cranes' started by Tugger2, Mar 24, 2018.

  1. colson04

    colson04 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    790
    Location:
    Delton, Michigan
    I'm sure if I had @John C. Or @Tugger2 time in the seat I could be decent. There's a guy about 3 miles south of here that has 2 old cranes with draglines sitting on either side of his pond. In the last 15 years, I've only ever seen one of them run for maybe a day mucking out the bottom. I know of one other crane, not sure make or model, sitting off in the woods near an old pond a couple miles to my east as well. Last time I saw it, it had a tree growing through it, but the engine still busted off and ran.
     
    DMiller likes this.
  2. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Messages:
    8,717
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Hermann, Missouri
    Never hurts to ask if can rent!!
     
  3. Tugger2

    Tugger2 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2018
    Messages:
    628
    Location:
    British Columbia
    I can say that at the end of day running my machines with air controls im beat,especially doing logs with the grapple. When i first started doing jobs with the 22B i thought the hand frictions would be brutal, but i feel better after a shift on that. The Bucyrus s are so well engineered.The unused retract drum spins on its own for a bit after you shut everything down,a testament to nice bearing fits.
    How far is it practical to cast the dragline bucket?
     
    DMiller likes this.
  4. Tugger2

    Tugger2 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2018
    Messages:
    628
    Location:
    British Columbia
    We could coach you thru it ,its not that hard if you are keen and develop some understanding of the mechanics of the machine.
    Id do a road trip to help you just for a holiday if it werent for this covid thing.
     
    colson04 and DMiller like this.
  5. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2010
    Messages:
    5,048
    Location:
    Andrews SC
    My brother in law can cast his bucket out from under the boom tip about 40' with a 45' boom. I on the other hand, do well not to just snarl it all up about halfway out.
     
    DMiller likes this.
  6. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    Messages:
    8,151
    Occupation:
    Machinery & Equipment Appraiser
    Location:
    Northwest
    If you want that video carefully and note where the bucket lands each time, it appears the operator is getting the bucket past the tip of the boom about twenty percent of the whole length of the boom. The cool thing to me is that move in the middle of the throw where the bucket is dropping and the machine swing stops for just a moment. Then the operator pulls back just a touch on the drag and lets go just as he eases into the swing. An operator with good feel will pick that up after a day or so and be able to get it to happen perfect maybe twenty five percent of the time to start with. The operator didn't miss a beat through out the video.
    The Koehring in my avatar was all manual and a little over twenty years old when I ran with the drag. I would have pain in the middle of my shoulders up into my neck. My thighs felt a deep burn for a few hours after I got off the machine. My dad spent ten years on that machine with a clam shell usually running ten hours a day. I never understood just how tired he was when he came home at night, until I got my turn on the machine.
     
  7. Tugger2

    Tugger2 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2018
    Messages:
    628
    Location:
    British Columbia
    Theres a knack for moving the bucket by playing with the swing. I do that with the clam ,sometimes to bring it in close to catch an edge. It saves booming up and the bucket gets a little wild when your boomed up high to. Ive only had the drag bucket on once we do a lot with the clam ,its slower but less disturbance i think.
    Men were men when these machines did it all.
     
  8. Bumpsteer

    Bumpsteer Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2009
    Messages:
    908
    Occupation:
    Mechanical designer
    Location:
    mid Michigan
    I can remember watching some of the "old timers" running a dragline...poetry in motion.
    Was dumbfounded the first time I watched a friend load a dumptruck with his little Bay City.

    Ed
     
    John C. and DMiller like this.
  9. dirty4fun

    dirty4fun Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Messages:
    1,113
    Location:
    N. IL
    I can still remember the first couple days I started out clamming brush off a ditch bank. Which wasn't bad because you got a break by moving the Linkbelt 78 Pipeliner. The first day of running the drag line bucket was a whole different thing. My legs were killing me, by afternoon, I was standing outside stretching and rubbing them when the boss's son drove up. He was laughing said he could remember his first couple days. He then taught me bunch of thing to make it easier. He could run it without using the brake pedals hardly at all. Then crossed his feet and operated the machine. He grew up running one, and was like his dad could make it look so easy!
     
    HATCHEQUIP, colson04, John C. and 2 others like this.
  10. Tugger2

    Tugger2 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2018
    Messages:
    628
    Location:
    British Columbia
    Heres something different. A few years ago there were guys buying up a lot of our old conventionals and shipping them to Vietnam so we heard .
    I couldnt resist watching this because of the American in it. If you follow this theres a complete circus over there of these sand and gravel barges navigating the rivers . Crash to pass .
    Looks like they wanted tons,but got loaded with tonnes instead,ive seen it happen here.
     
    John C. likes this.
  11. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Messages:
    8,717
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Hermann, Missouri
    Might have had a bit of help with LEAKS too!!
     
  12. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Messages:
    8,717
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Hermann, Missouri
    Nearly all the old US stuff that can be utilized goes Offshore, either Asia or South American markets, some end up on Island paradise lands where can slowly salt water rot to a brown stain. Not much stays in US that is functional or reasonably recent construction but also get bought for pennies or scrap value.
     
  13. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    Messages:
    8,151
    Occupation:
    Machinery & Equipment Appraiser
    Location:
    Northwest
    I don't know if there is much old stuff going over seas anymore. In the 2007 time frame there were pickers traveling the US looking for anything and everything. I haven't seen the phenomena for years. Most old stuff that I come in contact with just sits where it stopped running and nature hides it from people's view. A lot of stuff was found by the scrap man back in 2007 and early 2008. There is still plenty of twenty to forty years old stuff running today.
     
    dirty4fun and DMiller like this.
  14. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Messages:
    8,717
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Hermann, Missouri
    What came around will circle back as time moves by, the foreign purchasers will need to replenish the Simpler limited or non electronic stuff that is now coming to 20-40 years on duty.
     
  15. Birken Vogt

    Birken Vogt Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    Messages:
    3,146
    Location:
    Grass Valley, Ca
    Coming from somewhat of a hacker/electronics background I would also expect foreign buyers will figure out easier and easier delete schemes since there is no EPA to breathe down their neck and no warranty.

    Take a modern Tier 4 that some poor sap in the US has to sell for pennies on the dollar because he can't keep it running or stay in business to Vietnam, blank off the EGR, fix the VGT to some position that just works, remove the junk from the muffler and get some whiz kid to reprogram or replace the ECM with something that takes in cam position and fires the injectors when it's time and ignores all the punishment sensors.
     
    DB2, dirty4fun, colson04 and 4 others like this.
  16. ryanmueller

    ryanmueller Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2017
    Messages:
    194
    Location:
    oregon
    Yes. Hvlp
     
  17. ryanmueller

    ryanmueller Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2017
    Messages:
    194
    Location:
    oregon
    B6D7505D-A544-4FB5-87AA-1258048D4281.jpeg 1E63E9EB-86CD-47E0-B32D-713BC3EA627C.jpeg BF6A5DF2-C652-4601-B9A7-8E9223E9AB0B.jpeg Pond dredging with a dragline. I even managed to get a log stuck in the bucket. Rigging up a saurman next to reach everything I couldn’t reach.
     
    Bumpsteer, DMiller and John C. like this.
  18. ryanmueller

    ryanmueller Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2017
    Messages:
    194
    Location:
    oregon


    This was early on in the job. I got much better at casting. I could land the bucket clear on the other shore
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2020 at 5:31 AM
  19. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    Messages:
    8,151
    Occupation:
    Machinery & Equipment Appraiser
    Location:
    Northwest
    Being next to the house would be a little nerve racking.
     
    ryanmueller and DMiller like this.
  20. ryanmueller

    ryanmueller Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2017
    Messages:
    194
    Location:
    oregon

    Doing so slack line with a saurman bucket
     
    DMiller and John C. like this.