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Novice got a skylift SJ9250A

Discussion in 'Other Construction/Demolition Equipment' started by cooljjay, Dec 7, 2018 at 6:10 PM.

  1. cooljjay

    cooljjay Member

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    Hey group....

    1895569-1.jpg

    So I am attempting to restore a 1890's church and needed something to get me up the roof n beyond....figuring out my options at my budget...I figured a lift would be nicer then rigging up scaffolding and more efficient then climbing/ladders...n not to mention safer....

    lift.jpg

    So I stumbled across this scissor lift goes up crazier higher then I need it to, it is AWD and rough terrain....with a huge working platform...so I figured I would go for it...

    I bought it from a construction company, he bought it in a lot of equipment that was put out to pasture by a drywall company...he got it up n running with a new tank, pump...alternator etc....showed me that everything works etc...

    The problems I see, are the outriggers are leaking and the tires while foam filled are in pretty bad shape/old....I assume it will be fine to use for this project but I am curious about tires? How do I change a foam filled tire? I have a feeling that is why it was put out to pasture...

    I am waiting for it to be dropped off as he was also able to get some people together to help get it to me...you know kinda hard to tow this behind a mini van lol

    Okay, hit me with your best why did you buy this lol I am also paranoid to get it stuck in the ground but I haven't really read anything about anyone who has used a rough terrain manlift...everyone is always talking about the small ones you see at the big box stores changing light bulbs...
     
  2. Jonas302

    Jonas302 Senior Member

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    Foam filled tires are replaced as a unit wheel and tire at once the tires on this side look ok
     
  3. southernman13

    southernman13 Senior Member

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    They have to be cut off. Some of the bigger lifts like that don’t need the outrigger deployed unless you’re raising it above a certain height. You may check that out. The tires can be cut off and have new ones installed and foam filled. Unless they’re falling off they’re probably fine.
     
    Vetech63 likes this.
  4. cooljjay

    cooljjay Member

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    What are your guys thoughts on using these on rough terrain? Everything I read, people say they will automatically sink into the ground, get stuck driving them on anything but solid ground aka gravel, asphalt, concrete...and that as soon as you raise them....they will sink and tumble over....I don't have a backhoe to dig me out.....
     
  5. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    It will probably drive anywhere you can drive a 2wd pickup without getting stuck. If you think you can't drive a 2wd pickup in beside the church due to rain or snow, don't drive the lift in there. If you get it stuck, find a farmer with a tractor and he will likely get it back out.

    Drive it with the platform down, so you don't have to worry about tipping it over in bad conditions or on a slope.

    Put the outriggers down before going up unless on level concrete. If the ground is soft and its sinking, cut some 3/4" plywood in 3'x4' squares and double stack them on the soft side. Or stacks of 4"x4" crossed like lincoln logs if you need some more height under the plywood. It will spread out your weight to get better ground bearing.

    As far as the outriggers leaking, Oil leaking down the ram onto the ground is actually only the oil from the retract side of the cylinder, that side tends to catch the dirt and crud that gets past the wiper and that will take out those seals first. If its actually leaking down, i.e. not holding the platform up, you need to reseal the cylinders. A little damp on the retract, especially if it hasn't been used in a long time wouldn't worry me too bad. If its just gushing out, you'll need to reseal those. Nothing $50 worth of seals won't fix. $200 if you pay a shop to do it. $500 if you pay someone to come out and take it all off and fix it for you (my guesses).

    If you're worried about tearing up the grass and yard, 3/4" plywood where you are driving at makes a big difference too. If its super wet and muddy, it won't help.
     
  6. southernman13

    southernman13 Senior Member

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    Other than the ends I don’t see much use for a scissor lift on that church.
     
  7. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    I've worked off of one of those bigger work platform lifts. If he has to do the roof, its really nice to be able to put a bunch of shingles on it and use it at the eave. We used ours installing steel on pole barn type steel buildings and it was great for sidewall steel and roof steel.

    If he's going to side it, it sure beats a ladder. Won't be near as cheap as a ladder, but its lots nicer.
     
    cooljjay likes this.
  8. cooljjay

    cooljjay Member

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    Thanks for that!! That helps alot, we've had pickups in the yard before with out an issue....the church foundation was re poured in the early 2000's and I would imagine they compacted the soil a good amount...

    Thanks for the outrigger pad advice too, I was wondering what to use under them...if I needed too...

    As far as the yard/grass....that is no worry on my side...we're planning on redoing everything anyway plus I got a weed wacker if I can't push a mower over the rut/mounds lol

    The outriggers also appear to be leaking as you stated. I also noted today that the cylinder for the platform extension is leaking and I also noticed a leak in the center of the lift near the drive line somewhere....I also noticed a bolt holding a pin into the one of the scissor that is busted off...may have to keep an eye on that....

    ****

    At the moment, I can't do anything with it......It was delivered today and we couldn't get it off the truck :( I am a totally novice first to admit but we got it started but was unable to get the wheels to turn, to go into drive, lift to go up but the lower button/switch would work...an occasional outrigger would work too....

    I am so upset, mainly because the gal drove 3hrs to drop it off...I tried every combination of buttons I could and I couldn't get it to drive.....just reeve up like it wanted to move but couldn't....I had no choice but to tell her to take it back...

    One tire is also really tore up...
     
  9. cooljjay

    cooljjay Member

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    Yeh like what was said below.....we plan to use it on the roof first, it will help us bring up all the sheathing, paper, asphalt etc....doing that with ladders would be no fun, plus when I will be really the only one doing it...

    It is also nicer if you slid down the roof to land on the lift...then to drop 20ft to the ground, we also get volunteers that like to help....much easier to bring a teens up on a lift then an aframe....

    We also plan to restore all the siding with it too in the future, we're also doing the pastors house next door and man! The moving of the ladders to get to ever foot of the siding to do the work is a PITA...
     
  10. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    I wouldn't worry about cracked tires or even if there are chunks of rubber gone. No more than what you're going to use it it will probably be fine. That's why they get foam filled. So you can't have a blowout and tip the platform. If you want to replace them, there's places in Kansas City that will cut them off, but its expensive to buy all new rubber and get them foam filled.

    If the leaks are bad on the cylinders you're going to have to address that, but I'd run it for a little while and see what it does, if it hasn't been run in quite a while, the seals get a little dried out and weep some. It might get better and it might get a bunch worse.

    As far as the unloading, there's typically a key in the lower box between the wheels, you have to switch it to the upper platform and drive it from up there. Make sure the emergency stops aren't pushed. There's typically a stop upstairs and one downstairs.

    Find the owners manual online for the machine and read it. You'll have a lot better feel for the machine.
     
  11. cooljjay

    cooljjay Member

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    That is my theory, nice to know there is a place not to far. I looked at new rubber already mounted and yeah your right! Would cost me what I paid for the lift lol I see used sets on craigslist and I might keep an eye out for a cheap used set of tires n a little better shape...though that is if I plan to use this on other jobs or get enough people interested in it...

    I was thinking that too, just see how the leaks go and monitor them....hard to say how bad they are till I start using it and keep an eye on it

    This one only seemed to have one key, on the controller which you turned from lift to drive depending on what you wanted. I seen the emergency lower above the hydraulic reservoir and another button near that but messing with those didn't help one bit. I REALLLY!!! didn't want to tell her to take it back, she hauled it about 3 hours...the guys who I got it from were really nice, they said if I could get it down....they would come up here and fix it but I just couldn't figure it out...

    Oh yeh! I hunted down the manual after I bought it, printed it out and put it in a binder to easy read it....but the manual even said just turn the key to drive, hit start and use the stick to drive....said there is a parking break that must be set when winched etc but it automatically kicks off when put in drive...she said that she didn't see him push anything, just drove it on....turned it off and gave her the control box...
     
  12. southernman13

    southernman13 Senior Member

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    I understand it’ll help
    With many of these things but far less than the ideal piece. Getting the roofing supplies up on it is going to be a chore. Lowered the platform still pretty high of the ground. But it’s what you have so use it!! Typically a scissor lift is used for overhead work.
     
  13. southernman13

    southernman13 Senior Member

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    I’m very familiar with the use of lifts
    I’ve owned a lift company for over 20 years and
    Been in the business over 30. Still own a few
    For personal use. A lot of these units with outriggers won’t drive if one of the outriggers are
    Down. So if one leaked down even slightly it cuts out the drive function. You have to deadhead the outriggers to make sure they’re up. I’d probably look for something else from the sounds of what your describing. Many issues to be dealt
    With. You want a lift to be in good safe working order. That’s your life up on that thing. Plus it’s way overkill as far as size. Imho it would be more trouble than it’s worth for what you want to do.
     
  14. cooljjay

    cooljjay Member

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    Yeah I know it would be a bit hard to get supplies on the lift but it is easier to step up a few feet on a ladder n hand them up....then attempt to climb a ladder with a roll of paper on one shoulder...

    What would you use? Out of curiosity...I have a budget of 5k for equipment to get people/supplies on the roof and around the building...I don't have a truck/trailer capable of hauling machinery or large amounts of scaffolding.....I am one person and two on a good day..sever arthritis...I live in small town America so not many places have large equipment or scaffolding....I looked at a lot of options before deciding on this...
     
  15. southernman13

    southernman13 Senior Member

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    That’s not much of a budget to work with. You’ll probably eat that up trying to get that lift in good operating order. Ideally a telehandler but that’s out of the question on that money. Most places I’ve dealt with will deliver roofing shingles on the roof. I’d check into that first. You can get a genie material lift like an slc 18 manual powered that would lift materials from ground level. Climbing a ladder would only be a few more steps than getting on that big lift. The lift isn’t a terrible idea it’s just very large and seems to be a money pit right off the bat. Also legally as far as osha/ansi goes it has to be annually inspected and have a sticker and paperwork to back it up. God forbid Should anyone get hurt that’s the first thing they’ll look at. Plus your not supposed to operate it with the guardrails taken off. May be difficult to deal with supplies just through the entry gate