1. Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!

Not that is Not already a Scene

Discussion in 'Safety Issues' started by DMiller, Oct 1, 2019.

  1. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2013
    Messages:
    5,593
    Location:
    WI
    They do make an impressive electronic fly swatter for $2.99!
     
    DMiller likes this.
  2. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Messages:
    5,899
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Hermann, Missouri
    We have TWO!!!
     
  3. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2014
    Messages:
    2,575
    Location:
    Canada
    I would guess it depends on which mill the steel is coming from. Edmonton Exchanger gets some of their plate from China and they have a lot of plate up to 12" thick. They will test it to what ever specs. the customer requires. This is just plate though and not finished components coming from China. Alberta has some of the highest standards in the world when it comes to pressure vessels.

    https://www.edmontonexchanger.com/pressure-vessel-components/pressure-vessel-plate/

    https://www.edmontonexchanger.com/pressure-vessel-components/pressure-vessel-plate-rolling/
     
    DMiller likes this.
  4. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Messages:
    5,899
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Hermann, Missouri
    ASME Requirements for High Pressure systems are pretty well standards. We lived by them at the Nuke, still had Flow Accelerated Corrosion issues, had a 8" 45 degree turn erode thin on a unisolable pipe, fish mouth failure shot the failed six in by 9 inch piece of steel almost forty feet impaled into a outer steel building skin. Remnant of the pipe ripped a spring can support away twisted and then smashed into a building I-beam, small one 18" web 6 inch flanges 1/2" thick bent it almost five inches off line. Only had 250 degree F 105# steam at minimal volume as a reheat recovery line. Scary enough EVERY Pipe replacement component was EXTREMELY tested and inspected before welding into system. I had been alongside that pipe not 10 hours earlier of the event.

    Walked pasty 600# Condensate and 1200# feedwater supply piping and 1050# main steam supply piping nearly every week, most water systems over 480 degrees, steam was just at 545 degrees. Would never know died/dying if had been exposed to a shear failure explosion or steam cloud. Just did not dwell on it.
     
    check likes this.
  5. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2014
    Messages:
    2,575
    Location:
    Canada
    I'm not sure what the standards are where you are or if somebody was trying to cut corners not specifying a higher grade of steel? A friend of mine worked on some 400 ton cokers for the oilsands. All the piping was nuclear spec. which basically meant no margin of error. If weld X-rays showed anything other than perfect they couldn't be repaired. The joint had to be cut part and completely rewelded. All TIG using some fancy automated system.
     
  6. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Messages:
    5,899
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Hermann, Missouri
    We worked to that same level, Nuke power was unforgiving of any margin of error either the clean or the dirty sides.
     
  7. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    Messages:
    6,631
    Occupation:
    Machinery & Equipment Appraiser
    Location:
    Northwest
    My experience with the Chinese is that to them nothing is dishonest. If you cheat and get away with it, you are considered clever.
     
    aighead, DMiller and check like this.
  8. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2015
    Messages:
    2,621
    Location:
    SE Washington St
    Several sides to this, Timken rep told me {don't worry about their bearings stamped-China-because the tooling that's used is newer than what is used here in the U.S. . Really?
    Back in 05-06 Horton bought off shore bearings for their fan hubs on certain models. We had eleven ISX engines that had those hubs with cheap bearings-we lost four radiators
    chopped all to hell when the hubs let go all under 150,000 miles. Horton covered everything and exchanged the rest of the hubs no questions asked. But just how much did that
    cost Horton over all.
    Cummins ISX exhaust manifolds built in 05, 06 & 07 had major issues with cracking, But here's the catch-the ones stamped China were ok-the ones stamped U.S. broke.

    For years Eaton gears and internal hard parts in their transmissions, for example a RTLO18913A all hand parts stamped Can, UK. Then about 12 years ago the OEM replacement parts
    started entering the market stamped China. Then the new transmissions came with China parts. Since then it is not uncommon to lose a 13spd at around 350,000 miles.
    Front sections go to hell, which was pretty uncommon years ago.

    All of this can be laid at the feet of the top management. Their trying to peal to much profit off the top, Most of the utility/power companies across the U.S. have bad infrastructure.
    They changed the requirement of change out times to a longer status just to shove it down the road, it looks better on the profit/loss statement.
     
    check and DMiller like this.
  9. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Messages:
    5,899
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Hermann, Missouri
    We had the Original High Voltage Step Up transformers at work for 31 years, life cycle by GE was figured to 25 years so dragged an extra 6 years of life out of basically oil filled explosive devices. As they age the organic materials inside them(Wood and paper of all things) breaks down in the oil bath, after a time that allows arcing to occur which transfers to accumulated gases of the oil breakdown due to the heat of arcing inside the normally oil filled casings. I walked around those 10,000 gallon oil filled time bombs for sixteen years taking gas level readings where was explained if saw more than a considered dangerous level to stay away from them. That number got adjusted UP several times until we as operators said enough and they went to remote equipment.
    The lead time of large transformers as these is from 2 to 5 years dependent on the design, saw the effect of two failures at our dirt burner sites with the same conditions as we watched where those devices failed. Utilities today are scraping the bottom of the barrel, they are dealing with regulations exceeding capability to deal with while rates are held artificially down for the poor to be able to have electricity only to still fail to pay their bills.

    Most do not understand power plants make no profits, they are expense only usually tied to a 25 year life cycle development loan. O&M as to wages/benefits/tooling, fuels, major overhauls and loan payments are all that are recovered during the years of operations, the profits go to the owning utility as to end of use rates. Power lines, poles, distribution transformers, distribution substations, linemen and equipment for repairs, even metering mechanisms are paid for by the consumer with their energy usage fee, power stations and line transmission lines towers & substations with all the manpower etc. are just the base number for the electricity per kwh. The nuke I worked at cost the company $.06/kwh, most dirt burners were similar, the CTG units were closer to $.30/kwh due to extent of maintenance per hour run time and fuel consumption. The Customer rate here is $.15/kwh.

    These are the old(still installed) and new replacement transformers when we did that swap out. These changed 25,000VAC to 345,000VAC(closer to 360,000 for actual transmission)
    012.JPG