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new ride

Discussion in 'Cranes' started by Tradesman, Apr 28, 2013.

  1. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
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    1,653
    Location:
    sw missouri
    Cattle barn?

    Supposed to be 53 degrees (F) tomorrow here, 66 and 67 here wednesday and thursday. Just saying:).

    I don't know what that is in celsius, but it isn't a 6" of snow to work in........
     
  2. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    Apr 24, 2013
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    617
    Occupation:
    Contractor
    Location:
    Ontario
    -5 c yesterday and sunny it was quite a pleasant day for working. ( no flies no mud)
    The building is a loafing shed for race horses, so on dirty days they can be outside but under roof.
     
  3. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Location:
    sw missouri
    Just because I'm going to ask- if you got the crane in the building to set the I-beam, why didn't you just set in there to set the trusses?

    Put the trusses just outside the wall, set beside the I beam and reach both halves? Walk the crane ahead once or twice and then outside the building to finish?

    Probably didn't have room? Not being critical- just curious (rather than bringing in a bigger crane).
     
  4. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    Contractor
    Location:
    Ontario
    All good questions, with multiple answers. They are very large shallow trusses and hard to handle so moving them would be a big time consuming job, the first truss to set to the centre of the pile is 180 ft.
    ( I'm the guy to finish a job someone else started, the trusses where dropped previous to my involvement) I don't have a large enough spreader bar, and I want the best climber I know on the roof on this one to move things along, and he usually runs my crane;)
     
  5. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Location:
    sw missouri
    I figured it was the truss pile in the wrong spot. I don't know how many semi loads of trusses I've moved 3-4 at a time to get them from where they were dropped to where I needed them to be to set them. It's time consuming, and really flat trusses like those are so flimsy that they're hard to move.

    Its never fun moving the whole pile closer, or the best is when they ship them with the 3rd truss you need to set, on the bottom of the stack. Its great because its always on the jobsite where you don't have anywhere to lay them at.
     
  6. Natman

    Natman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2016
    Messages:
    173
    Location:
    ID
    Taking a tour of a truss plant once was real educational for me. Turns out, they stack them based on how they produce them, and they produce them in the order that is easiest for them. There was a lot of hand labor, many people man handling them. Anyway, they claimed they didn't stack them back asswards just to annoy the carpenters! It sure gives us a lot of extra work though. One of the things I enjoy most about running the 30 ton now, as compared to the previous 10 ton, the two 17's, and the 22 ton, is the increased capability to move entire stacks around, no surprise there I guess.
     
  7. Birken Vogt

    Birken Vogt Charter Member

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    Nov 30, 2003
    Messages:
    1,624
    Location:
    Grass Valley, Ca
    Back when I was a nail bender we exclusively used the smaller more "boutique" truss builder. The guy had himself and one helper and he drove his own boom truck to job sites to deliver on top of the plates. Well he always had them stacked in the right order. He also always showed up within about 5 minutes of the scheduled time and would go through mud and whatever it took to get the job done.

    He also used #1 and better dry lumber instead of #2 green like the "big" truss builder.

    Guess what, when the recession hit, the big one went under, the little guy kept plugging along and he looks busier than ever today.