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new gas cans...

Discussion in 'Safety Issues' started by stumpjumper83, May 18, 2013.

  1. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    Thanks for the explaination and clearification, I don't know of anyone paying those prices for waste oil or waste gasoline around my area, around here you can trade used oil for oil filters at some dealerships otherwise its about 20 cents a gallon.
     
  2. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    Last time we had our waste oil picked up we were paid $.85 per gallon, had about 400 gallons so not a bad paycheck for something that used to be a burden to dispose of. With the economy in the toilet, (regardless of what the talking heads say :rolleyes:) it takes a while to get 400 gallons.:(

    What instances generate waste gasoline? Of course I understand the term just don't know what circumstances produces it. Only my small engines run gasoline and we burn through it as it is needed. I add gasoline stabilizer to my 5 gallon red safety can every time I fill it up because the ethanol wreaks havoc on the carbs.
     
  3. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    amen!
     
  4. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

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    I just buy only ethanol free gas for my little engines. I had it actually dissolve the casting on 2 B&S carbs. Anywhere you rubbed it turned to powder
     
  5. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    We don't keep gasoline in small engine long, if it sits for long periods of time, we don't even mess with it, just dump it out and fill with fresh and then dispose of the old gasoline, it causes more problems than its worth, so we just start out new, try to run the engine out of fuel or dump it out when we're done using whatever it is, or turn the gas off and let the engine die on its own kind of thing. But for what its worth, those small gas engines should be outlawed and only diesel engines should be allowed, when they come out with a chainsaw that has a lightweight diesel on it, I'm gonna be the first to buy one.

    My wife used to have some string trimmers and a few push mowers and at least two gas riders, I made life easier on myself, I bought a big diesel mower, drove over the push mowers, and the string trimmer and tossed them in the garbage, and got out the dozer and excavator, nothing can't be mowed with the rider now, we cleaned a path to everywhere, now its mowed with the diesel or its no longer lawn, never heard of word of complaint either.

    But to answer your question, after you have a couple dozen gas engine things, small worthless one's on nonessential used items, you dump out the gas, put in new, cross your fingers and hope it starts and move on with life, or option two, take the dang thing in to my local fixit guy, we have that love hate relationship going on, and let him fix it so it starts and runs, then take home my bad gas with my fixed pos small engine and run it this time and wait till I need it again the next time and repeat the process. As for ethanol gas being bad, its all worthless, some just far more than others.

    As for what to do with the old gas, easy solved many problems in one fell swoop, put it in red gas cans and leave it sit out, hopefully someone steals it, and after I see the local kids stuff at the fix it guys shop, [thats where the love me protion of the relationship comes from] even they won't steal any of my gas anymore, I think my fix it guy knows if he sends home my bad gas it drums up more business for him, he's evil that way, but kids can learn, who'da thunk it, the upside is, there's always new kids coming along every year with dirt bikes and scooters and what not, I try to feel I'm being charitable while teaching a lesson.

    I've also been known to take gasoline from the local repair shops in bulk, where someone dumped the wrong fuel in, like two stroke gas in a car or old stale gas out of small engines or left a gas cap off and it got water in it, I took home a 55 gallon barrel partially full of bad gas and left it sit out, marked it bulk four wheeler gas and some kids stole it, ironically it was the same gas I got from the repair shop that week out of the same car on round one, I got on round two as well, personally I think it my two stoke gas on round one too I'd left sit out the first time, and some of you don't know how to stimulate the economy and keep money in circulation and people busy.
     
  6. lantraxco

    lantraxco Senior Member

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    That's some funny stuff there!

    :notworthy
     
  7. CraneInnovation

    CraneInnovation Well-Known Member

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    Don't get me started on the new gas cans...

    I ran out of gas (faulty gauge in a new used car) and bought a can and some gas at the nearest station. Brought it back to my car, noticed the funny new spout, read the directions, and tried to pour.

    Not a drop came out. Tried everything the instruction said....nothing.

    Finally figured out how it works. What you do is take out your Leatherman and use the saw to cut the flipping spout right in half. You need to work around it because the inside is full of more gadgets than I thought were possible. Once you've got a cut, you'll notice the end will still be firmly attached. Place the lower end on the edge of the curb and stomp the upper end off. Springs WILL go flying. Take the pliers and rip the remaining guts out of the lower half. Screw onto gas can and you now how a full functional spout.

    If working on the side of the road, like I was, make sure you wear your safety vest.

    Freaking morons.
     
  8. Toms78case

    Toms78case Member

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    Ok, this is all good. But How do you take your NON DOT gas can to the station to fill it?

    :beatsme Food for thought.
     
  9. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

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    Does anyone pump gas in a service station to notice. I know of only one station that pumps your gas within 100 miles of here. I ripped the guts out of a couple mine also. They have a plug that goes under the cap to seal them for transport. I drilled a hole in top of the plastic can and inserted a tire air valve. With the guts out of the valve it makes a great air vent. I just screw the plastic dust cap on to seal it. Works great and spills a lot less than the DOT bullsh**t they had.
     
  10. lantraxco

    lantraxco Senior Member

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    Oregon is mostly a good place to live, no sales tax, but for some odd reason unless you're riding a motorcycle, you can't pump your own gas, LOL.

    They won't fill milk jugs or the like, or five gallon buckets, but anything that looks like it might be a gas can is fine and gallon or bigger oil jugs seem to be okay in some places. You gotta set it on the ground to fill it though....
     
  11. oldtanker

    oldtanker Senior Member

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    The owners of a small earth moving outfit here is mad as heck about the DOT cans. I can load one of my Ford 8N tractors wo move it someplace to do small fieldwork or mowing, strap down a 5 gallon plastic gas can and I'm legal. They have a hydraulically operated dovetail ramp on a lowboy that's powered by a gas engine. They have to have a DOT approved gas can for it. Here in MN DOT road side inspections will nail you for the plastic can on a commercial vehicle.

    As far as the new cans are concerned. I bought a 2 gallon one this spring. First really warm day, with it about 3/4s full it split wide open. Thank you EPA.

    Rick
     
  12. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    I just pull up to the pump and fill it.:confused:
     
  13. oldtanker

    oldtanker Senior Member

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    Hey you are in AL, you guys down there can't spell DOT!

    Here it's not legal to use anything but a container designed for fuel. Supposed to use red for gas, yellow for diesel and blue for kerosene by law. I don't think anyone pays much attention to those laws. I do use the correct colored can simply because if I'm in a rush I grab the filled can that is the correct color for whatever I need fuel for. No mistakes that way.

    Rick
     
  14. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    The question was -
    I assume all your colored cans are DOT approved?
     
  15. Tinkerer

    Tinkerer Senior Member

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    Mine were , now they aren't. I use 5 gallon steel safety cans.They have the neatest vents on them. Do an internet search for yellow gas can vents. I don't have a commercial vehicle so its not a problem. With self-serve pumps, nobody seems to care what color the can is or what fuel you put in it. All of my cans used to be red and I put both diesel fuel and gas in them. I now have yellow cans for diesel fuel after my grandson filled my JD riding lawn mower with diesel fuel.
     
  16. Tugger

    Tugger Well-Known Member

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    Lucky he didn't put the gas in your diesel engine .Ive used 2 gallon galvanized gas cans for saw gas for for 40 years as have many others,now there aren't safe?Has anyone heard of any catastrophies caused by them?
     
  17. hetkind

    hetkind Senior Member

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    I have seen video and read reports about plenty of problems caused by poor gas cans...spilling and causing a fire, getting hot in the sun and splitting the side from pressure, and the latest and greatest issues are filling the plastic nonconductive gas cans on a plastic truck bed liner and having a spark from the static of filling the can catch the vapor on fire. Yes, filling a gas can will create a static charge from the falling stream and droplets and a metal can on the ground will bleed that away.

    I have been buying the metal EAGLE brand cans with the spring loaded lids that self vent, and they work far better than my worn out plastic cans which are getting old and failing.

    Howard
     
  18. oldtanker

    oldtanker Senior Member

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    Naw, I was just teasing when I noticed where you are from about the spelling....

    As far as my cans, they are in fact DOT approved. When I wrote that I was still faming so yes I was legal. Now even more so that I'm retired.

    Funny thing is I was filling can last summer and putting them in that back of a pickup when a friend in the earth moving business complained about me being able to sue the cheaper DOT approved plastic cans when he was forced to use metal more expensive ones for his low bed trailer aux engine.

    Rick
     
  19. hetkind

    hetkind Senior Member

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    Actually, what they need is NFPA 30 compliance for portable cans, since DOT is now under Performance Oriented Packaging. And mine all meet the NFPA 30 requirements, plus the OSHA 29 CFR 1910.106. Now the truck mounted fuel tanks are different story...they are under the Motor Vehicles Carrier Regulations, IIRC.

    Howard



     
  20. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

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    And there it is in a nutshell. If you take time to keep up on all the regulations you are out of business because you had no time left to run your business.
    Before I retired a year ago I spent many hours each week trying to understand OSHA rules. The company I managed work for spared no expense in purchasing any safety equipment we needed or thought we did. We received the yearly safest contractor awards in MN, WI, CO, and CA in different years but it was not easy nor cheap. I truely think OSHA does a good job and also DOT does to for the most part but they get wound up on non issues. We may not need a new law when only one in a million get hurt with something. On some of these the cures cause more injuries than the original "problem" did. And a envirionmental can does not make it safe and if it spills trying to make it work its not helping. Them metal safety spring loaded cans are not easy to fill or pour either. Plenty gets spilled doing both. OK, off the soapbox.