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Need advice on trailer ratings

Discussion in 'Trailers' started by Miller2706, Mar 11, 2009.

  1. Miller2706

    Miller2706 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2009
    Messages:
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    Location:
    Lake Crystal, Minnesota
    Hey Everyone-
    Looking for some advice on trailer ratings. I just picked up an older Ford f-350 pickup truck with utility box and am looking at backhoe about the size of a Deere 310c, 210c or Case 580. My question is, how big of a trailer would I need to haul a backhoe this size. I have no clue what these backhoes weigh, or how the whole GVWR deal works, so any help would be great.

    I've seen 20 ft tandem axle trailers saying they are rated for 14,000lbs, would something like that be big enough? They look like beefy car trailers and say they have a width of 82 inches between the fenders.

    Im not looking to haul down interstates or even at highway speeds, just pull from one farmsite to the next every once in a while.

    thanks
     
  2. tootalltimmy

    tootalltimmy Senior Member

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    Location:
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    Check this link out.

    http://http://www.ritchiespecs.com/specification?type=Construction+Equipment&category=Loader+Backhoe&make=Case&model=580M&modelid=91945

    Gross vehicle weight is the total weight allowed.
    Weight of trailer (tare weight) plus the backhoe load will have to be less than the GVWR.

    You will have to take into account the allowable towing capacity of your truck as well as tongue weight.

    The trailer GVWR will be based on the rating of the axles, there are 3500lb, 7000lb and 10000lb axles.

    I pulled a tilt deck trailer where the tires were the load limiting factor. Each tire had a load rating and when the 8 tires were added up it was less than the GVWR.
     
  3. Cretebaby

    Cretebaby Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    E. Iowa
    Can you use a gooseneck or does it need to be a bumperhitch?

    That would be a lot to pull with a bumper hitch IMO

    You will need a 20k# trailer and it need to be a deckover(no fenders) since the backhoe wont fit between the fenders
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2009
  4. John DiMartino

    John DiMartino Super Moderator

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    Greenskeeper/mechanic
    Location:
    Walden, NY
    This is just my opinion,but you may want to look at a bigger truck as well.An older F350 is small to pull the a 310 JD or a 580 Case.I know it can do it,but your going to have the tail wagging the dog scenario,esp with a bumper pull.
    If you are going to do it,I suggest a gooseneck,like was stated above,10 ton minimum,prefferably a 12t.
    A Case 580 will kill a 14KGVWR trailer in no time,as it will overload it,and will need to be a deckover.
     
  5. PSDF350

    PSDF350 Senior Member

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    Richmond NH
    Also lets not forget you will need a class A cdl to tow anything over 10,000# commercially.
     
  6. Cretebaby

    Cretebaby Senior Member

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    Cough Cough...Not necessarily....


    But yes the backhoe behind a F350 will need a class A

    Unless there is special provisions for farm use
     
  7. Miller2706

    Miller2706 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2009
    Messages:
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    Location:
    Lake Crystal, Minnesota
    Thanks for all the replies guys-

    So does the GVWR include the weight of the truck, or is it just the weight of the trailer and backhoe?


    Doing a little research, a JD210c weighs around 10,800 lbs, and has a wheel width of 75 inches.

    I cant use a 5th wheel as my truck has a utility box on the back.

    So, if I bought a 14,000# trailer that has a distance of 82 inches between the fenders, would a 10,800lb JD210c be too much for it? It would fit on the actual trailer, just wondering if it would smash it!

    My Dad had a small construction company before he passed away 5 years ago, he used to haul a 410A (late 60's?) on a triple axle pintle hitch trailer he had behind his 88' Ford F-250 just fine. Prob not legal, but pulled it!
     
  8. Cretebaby

    Cretebaby Senior Member

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    Location:
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    That combo would be under CDL
     
  9. tootalltimmy

    tootalltimmy Senior Member

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    Location:
    Okanagan Falls B.C. Canada
    Just going by the Richie Bros specs from my link above, the width of the
    JD210c is 7.5 ft or 90 inches. It gave the metric width at 2300 mm which also converts to 90 inches. You will need a deckover trailer.
     
  10. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder Staff Member

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    GVWR= Gross Vehicle Weight Rating and is for the individual unit, in this case the trailer. GCWR- Gross Combined Weight Rating which is the entire combination of truck, trailer and cargo. You'll be exceeding that on the F-350 by quite a bit and certainly won't be legal, and in my opinion won't be safe either. I have a skid steer I move occasionally with my 350 when the 550 isn't available and believe me, it's a handful. Yes, I can get the job done but I've got my cheeks clamped for the whole ride. You either need to look a lighter machine or a heavier truck.
     
  11. Cretebaby

    Cretebaby Senior Member

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    Steve can you tell us what the GCWR for a F350 is and where to find it on the truck

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2009
  12. Cretebaby

    Cretebaby Senior Member

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    After further review

    It would depend on the exact configuration of you truck
     
  13. RTSmith

    RTSmith Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    Amateur demolition & dirt pusher
    Location:
    Middle Tenn.
    For a backhoe, I'd prefer a GN. But - be sure and look at your actual hitch carrying capacity. It should be stamped in the receiver hitch itself. You might see it isn't near heavy enough for your task at hand. Most are topping out at 10,000 when used in a weight distributing capacity, 5,000# in a regular tow mode.

    And re-reading your post, if you'll haul that little- what about just roading the lil rascal??
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2009
  14. mudmaker

    mudmaker Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Colorado
    The GCVWR is the gvwr of the pickup added with the gvwr of the trailer. If you look in ford brochures they have GCVW ratings, but they are not a legal rating like the GVWR stamped on the ID tag.

    If your pickup is 11k and trailer is 14k then your GCVWR is 25k. Put a 24k trailer behind it and it jumps to 35k. Or in my case when I was running a hotshot I had a F350 legal in 48 states to run 42k.(12k pickup and 30k trailer)