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need advice on buying a telehandler

Discussion in 'Forklifts/Telehandlers' started by rustylhurtt, Jun 8, 2009.

  1. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

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    Exact same machine with one exception the axles. The Series II has German company ZF axles and the previous model has Spicer / Dana axles. There may be a few tiny tweaks but not many. You can go to JLG web site and look in the free on-line parts catalog and it will give you any revisions, One 97 just went for 18,000 on ebay I think it had 5,000+ hrs. Looked good and looked like someone actually greased it. I see many machines and they look dry!

    I didn't like the 1044 on ebay because it didn't have a rotating carriage and a big PITA to plumb it for that.

    scroll down and you will see it and a video.
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=180423363519&ssPageName=STRK:MEDWX:IT

    what are you looking for?
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2009
  2. EdB

    EdB Active Member

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    Thank you sir. Good info on the manuals at the link.
    I did indeed notice that Lull on ebay.
    I really don't know if I need a telehandler but a few years ago, I bought a stand-up electric Schaeff 5,000 pounder for use in my shop. Didn't really know how much I'd use the thing but after having it around, both of the mechanics around here seem to agree that a fork is close to the most important of our tools. It doesn't work hardly at all, off the concrete so I've been thinking of getting something that works on the dirt. As many have noticed, telehandlers are ridiculous cheap, will work as a 10K forklift, and also have the advantage of extended reach that I can use for working on buildings and grain storage facilities around here.
    So I can keep my head mechanic happy, he insists on shop manuals for the equipment and I'm shopping for a manual so I can keep him content. I see a set of parts and repair manuals on eBay for a Series II but it might be better to find a set for the pre II type. Sooner or later, everything seems to come up for sale on eBay and if you miss it, another comes along. Hope the same holds true for series I manuals.
    EdB
     
  3. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

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    Last edited: Nov 1, 2009
  4. EdB

    EdB Active Member

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    Boy! that's just right. Not only is it good -- it's great. I owe you one.
    Thanks a bunch. Now I have some reading to do.
    EdB
     
  5. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

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    they are selling the same thing on ebay for near 200 :eek: Just download on CD and have local store print up a few copies and put it in a book. Interney is great for knowledge.
     
  6. EdB

    EdB Active Member

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    Manuals

    Manuals are very expensive -- not as much so if they save a service call though. This set was somewhere around $800 if I remember right. All ready paid for though.
    Your link was a great find. I have computers in both my workshops so likely won't bother printing all of the manual. Can just look up the pertinant pages and print those as needed.
    Have a good one.
    EdB
     

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  7. albertozordan

    albertozordan Member

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    New Holland telehandlers are not made by Manitou at all. They're made in Italy in the CNH manufacture plants.
     
  8. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

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    ///////
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2009
  9. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

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    800 OUCH!

    My luck when I need it the site is down:eek: I just downloaded them to my computer and can print from there if needed. Sad part is they don't have my machines online to old:( The good part is there were no payments for years.:D
     
  10. Framer

    Framer Well-Known Member

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    I think they used to make them, Manitou also manufactures in Italy from what I know. I've seen older new hollands and part for part they look like manitou's.
     
  11. EdB

    EdB Active Member

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    Hey Speedpup. Thanks for your help. Read the manuals that you linked to and when the lift showed up today, I had my trial by fire as the trucker didn't know how to drive a Lull and all I knew about it was what I'd read in the manuals. Anyways, I drove it down my makeshift ramp and got it on the ground in one piece.

    The eBay listing did say the lift had Aux hydraulics to the boom and even though they didn't show up in any of the pics, there are indeed two hoses that are capped with plugs way out at the end of the boom. Should make it a lot easier to have a tilt carriage if I ever decide it's something I can't live without.
     

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  12. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

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    Looks good any more pic's? Rotating carriage is good . How did it run?
     
  13. EdB

    EdB Active Member

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    More pics . . .

    Engine sounds really good. Being a hi-tech junkie, this thing seems like a throw-back to the old times though. Naturally aspirated 6 cylinder diesel, not many electronics and a lot of hydraulics and mechanical stuff. That's all right though. I can do the old stuff too.
    All the cylinders on the machine are dry, as are the hoses. Plenty of fresh grease on all the working parts and joints and the chains are nice and oily too. I'm pretty well convinced I got a bargain here. Tires are nearly new and foam filled to boot. For being a rental machine, I'm fairly impressed with the service that Coast Crane gives their machines. The engine has what looks to be a recently installed rebuild fuel pump. Looks like a clone of the venerable Roosa-Master. They don't like the dry ULSD fuel and there is also a big fiber washer on the inside of them that disintegrates, plugs up the fuel return, and causes the engine to go to low idle. Not a big deal to fix, but if a guy didn't know what was happening, he might just get a rebuilt pump and install it. One or the other or possibly a combination of both may have gotten this one.
    Here are a couple more pics of my machine.
     

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  14. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

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    I here Coast Crane is decent stuff. Their machines look like they have been serviced. I look at other stuff and see rusted pins, bound up chains and new paint.:eek: I would rather have a machine with the OEM paint to really see how it was treated. Good luck it looks great. I don't want a computer machine either.
     
  15. EdB

    EdB Active Member

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    I'm with you on the new paint. Makes me nervous too.
    Noticed what looks to be an update of some sort. Looks like they may have added or reinforced a cross-member inside the frame behind the front tire. I'll have to take a couple pics and see what your opinion of it is.
    If you don't like electronics, you'd really hate my tracked Challenger MT tractor. That thing is completely 'fly-by-wire'. Put auto-steer on it last spring and that was easy. No hydraulic valves or extra wiring needed. Plug the auto-steer into the 4 wire Can-Bus connector and away we went.
     
  16. Impact

    Impact Senior Member

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    I've got a Gehl 663, Gehl 883, Lull 944, and just about to buy a Pettibone 8044. I don't generally buy new, but this machine is priced at 66% of new. Although older machines, I LOVE the Gehls. Compared to the heavier Lull, they seem to tiptoe across the job site like a ballerina dancer. I'm hoping the Pettibone is like that.
     
  17. quihultwi

    quihultwi New Member

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    I accept with information:I also see where some have remotes for a man platform. You set up the machine, then can step in the man platform and can run the boom up and down. I really also like the machines that have one control for all the functions (joystick and buttons), instead of this three different stick nonsense. I've run too many with hand, mid arm nudges, and elbows, or hooking you're left arm in the wheel and reaching across. Outriggers are a mixed blessing, they really help in stability and give you much more capacity when reaching way out. When reaching out on rubber, you can feel the machine getting light, with the outriggers set, you have no idea until you are really in trouble

    __________________
    Taux simulation de prets immo bancaire | Credit simulateur de pret personnel | Simulateur de pret immobilier gratuit
     
  18. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

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    With the reach of some of these machines and with outriggers better use your load charts as the booms can fail when extended to far before tipping.:eek:
     
  19. EdB

    EdB Active Member

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    When I was looking and researching what I'd like in a telehandler, I talked with a bunch of used dealer/salesmen. When I mentioned SkyTrak or Gradall, most would point out the positives of the non-electric controls. The buttons and joysticks didn't get a great deal of positive responses. Most of the guys would point out that when electrical gremlins showed up, the usual response from guys that didn't enjoy electrical troubleshooting would be to buy a new wiring harness at $650+, replace that, and repeat the procedure when the gremlin re-appeared. Really wouldn't have been a big problem for me, because I have a fair understanding of electronics and electrical logic circuitry. Watching the travails of fellow farmers and their battles with electronics laden machines, I've come to the conclusion that even among the dealership techs, the solution is not to troubleshoot, as much as it is to replace until the problem goes away -- for a while.
    Aggravation and expense that no one really needs.
     
  20. K J R

    K J R New Member

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    Advice on the old LULL's 644 and 844

    I'm looking at some older LULL 644 or 844 lifts like I used to use. For residential framing, that transaction boom is a nice feature (where you don't have a lot of weight but need the reach) Any advice on what to beware of and .... how many hours to RUN from? I think I've only got about 9 or 10k to put in it, (may not get much, right) but if I could get a year out of it before major work or buying another one that would be great. Also, what's the market like right now? Is it a buyers market as in 07' ? Where are the best deals found these days? Is Iron Planet accurate in their assessments?