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My new trailer kicked my (youknowwhat) today

Discussion in 'Trailers' started by crane operator, Oct 15, 2016.

  1. planecrazzzy

    planecrazzzy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    Operator , Cert Welder , Class "A" Truck Driver
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    MN
    Warn pins get a "cam" look to them.... I use a hyd jack like you did to add pressure,
    and then try to move the piece til the Step/cam lines up... it pops, moves... then add more pressure
    at the next step/cam edge...
    JAM
     
  2. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    sw missouri
    Got the trailer back together today. New shaft showed up Friday, and I got after it this morning. Had to do a little tweaking around on the outer forks to get the shaft in.

    I marked it, then kind of jigged it up, to drill the 1/2" holes. I don't know how everyone else drills 1/2" holes in 2 5/8" shaft, but this is what I did. Started with 1/4" hole and worked up.

    It's a drill press that came from a production table, we just kind of clamp it up on stuff that's too big to put on the floor drill press. I just clamped it to one of the steel tables in the shop.

    20161105_113146.jpg


    The outer forks and inner tower took a little pushing and pulling with the forklift, the cylinders, and a chain come a long and a jack. Eventually I got it all lined up and the shaft is in.:D

    20161105_152433.jpg

    And it takes grease.
     
  3. Shimmy1

    Shimmy1 Senior Member

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    That's how mine looked, too. What a mess, huh? Hopefully we won't have to deal with this issue ever again.
     
  4. Metalman 55

    Metalman 55 Senior Member

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    Sounds like you had your fair share of problems, but with grit n determination you got through it. Good work! We did our annual safety on our lowboy when it was all apart with the blasting & painting job. All wheel bearings were good (put new seals on), needed new drums & shoes on the front axle, as the drums were "bell mouthed" & the shoes were wore unevenly.

    Our main pivot pin on the gooseneck has welded retainer plates that hold the pivot in place, so we did not take our pivot apart when blasting & painting, just kept moving the pivot to different positions to get the blasting & painting done.
     
  5. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    I hope I never have to mess with my pins again either shimmy1. Metalmann- I love how your trailer looks after the rebuild. I'm working right now on scaling off the rust, I've got one or two places to patch, and then it's getting some paint.
     
  6. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    Crane operator, sorry I got to the party late, but to get pins like that out, we use a torch with a piece of pipe on it and welder to plunge gouge through the pin, takes a few minutes and you eat out the shaft and they usually are pounded out with a small hammer, out of pocket cost is a section of 1/4 inch pipe and weld on tab on it to hook the welder to and a short hose to hook to the oxygen regulator.

    Nice job with the shaft though, I had to do the same thing to one of my lowboy's years ago, we also had to use a die grinder inside the bushing and cut a groove around it for the grease to go all the way around the shaft, mine froze up because there was no grease groove and the grease shot right by the zerk and 3/4ths of the shaft never got grease and rusted up solid.
     
  7. oarwhat

    oarwhat Senior Member

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    buffalo,n.y.
    Randy not really sure how you do this.
    "Crane operator, sorry I got to the party late, but to get pins like that out, we use a torch with a piece of pipe on it and welder to plunge gouge through the pin, takes a few minutes and you eat out the shaft and they usually are pounded out with a small hammer, out of pocket cost is a section of 1/4 inch pipe and weld on tab on it to hook the welder to and a short hose to hook to the oxygen regulator. "

    Do you have a picture? Or exactly how is it done? Thanks Randy
     
  8. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    You're basically making a oxy lance then, just using your torch as the oxygen source, are you hooking your lead to the pipe then? Does the slag come out the outside of the pipe, or up the inside?
     
  9. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    Yes its a lance, I looked this morning and its 1/8 inch pipe not 1/4 inch, I just hook up a shut off valve to the end of the pipe and weld a short tab on it to hook the welder lead on it to get a spark to light it, unhook the torch line from the oxygen regulator and hook up a line directly to the gas valve on the pipe, crank up the regulator to at least 80 psi or there about and keep the shut off valve off on the lance. Hook you welder stinger to the tab and turn on the welder and put a ground clamp on the work piece your torching, make sure you have plenty of fire proof clothing on and a helmet and touch the pipe to the work piece to get an arc and open the gas valve at about the same time, once lit you can unhook the welder stinger and the oxygen will blow the slag out towards you, it goes not up the pipe but outside it and the oxygen pressure blows the slag out of the shaft and hole your gouging, hence the need for the fire proof clothing, gloves and helmet, and keep contacting the pipe to shaft your blowing the hole through and your consuming the pipe as you shove it in so your getting closer to the work piece as you go. Once you have a hole started completely through, I usually gouge it out wider and then the slag will blow through the hole instead of back at you.

    I think there are some video's on youtube about it, I've never taken a video of it, basically don't have enough around to shoot the video and its over so fast we seldom have time to worry about it.

    Its very cheap and simple way to do it, doesn't take much, but some practice helps a lot before you go near a bushing your wanting to save, its messy and not hard to get off center and into the bushing and through it so fast, you don't have time to even say, OH SH*T.

    We've done it for manure tanker spindles that are eight inch solid shafts and rusted tight, had to do my scraper steering cylinder pins to get the cylinders off so we could reseal them. Done quite a few walking tandems on wagons over the years and had to do the shafts on the front of my detaches like you just did, but mine was rusted solid and snapped off. We just cut the shafts off flush to the bushing and blew a hole through where the bushing was seized up at, took a hammer and knocked the remnants of the shaft out with a small hammer.

    I also have the end with a gas valve and tab welded on separate and use a pipe coupler to hook a new three foot pipe to that I would call the consumable, that way I just put a new piece of pipe on when I'm done and its ready to go the next time and there is no welding or hooking up a gas valve again and nothing to remake for the next time. Hope this helps for next time, sorry I was too late to help you out on this project.
     
  10. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Thought I'd show some pictures from yesterday. Got a fresh coat of paint on it, after knocking off the rust. Just pulled out of the shop: 20170306_152843.jpg 20170306_152911.jpg
     
  11. Metalman 55

    Metalman 55 Senior Member

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    Nice looking refurbishment there Crane Operator. Did you sandblast too, or just clean it up & sand it?
     
  12. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    Looks great
     
  13. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    We just wire brushed and needle scaled the rust off. I didn't want to have it down for the time we would need to sandblast it all. I had to patch 2 holes half dollar size in the cross stringers. Main frames are pretty good. It looks better in the pictures than it probably does in person. Car guys call that a 40 footer paint job- looks great from 40 feet.

    I clean and wire brush, chip it all, then put on a layer of rustoleum rusty metal primer (it seems to bite into the old paint). Then finish coat- 2 layers. We've just paint roller and brushed the last two trailers, rather than spraying. I use the small foam rollers and cheap brushes for the corners, and the paint seems to lay down and the brush marks disappear. Plus I don't have to clean a spray gun, or deal with all the overspray and paint loss from that. If the phone rings in the middle of spraying its a big pain, if your just rolling and brush, its easier to put off until later.