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Moving excavator

Discussion in 'Equipment Moving Questions' started by Sk1970, Nov 12, 2020.

  1. Sk1970

    Sk1970 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2019
    Messages:
    14
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Have 102” wide lowboy 26’ well. Moving 325 11’ 1” wide haven’t been using any outrigger but it getting cold frozen material on pads. What type wood are people using for planks and how long are the planks you use. Thanks
     
  2. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2010
    Messages:
    5,183
    Location:
    Andrews SC
    White oak will last the longest, and usually 16'
     
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  3. Shimmy1

    Shimmy1 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2014
    Messages:
    2,814
    Location:
    North Dakota
    Find a hammer and knock the crap off the pads.
     
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  4. mx727

    mx727 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Messages:
    49
    Location:
    Memphis
    See if anyone in your area rips old telephone poles in to 2x planks.
     
  5. Junkyard

    Junkyard Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2016
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    Occupation:
    Field Mechanic
    Location:
    Claremore, OK
    Oak for outriggers. Depending on how thick your brackets are set up to use a 16’ might be more than you want to handle lol. Mine are 10’ or so. Measure your outrigger spacing and make sure the length you choose catches one at each end, especially the front so you don’t track over and pop it up. Also, have them cut about 1-1/2” narrower than your brackets so you can still get a hook into the flange of side rail for tie down should you need it.
     
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  6. skyking1

    skyking1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2020
    Messages:
    152
    Location:
    washington
    Pretty much this, I will take a weedburner to loosen up the frozen crap if needed. If you sit back far enough, you can safely thaw out door locks with a weedburner too.
     
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  7. suladas

    suladas Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2016
    Messages:
    722
    Location:
    Canada
    Depending on location that might work, but here it's not possible in the winter. When it gets down to -30 or colder they are frozen so solid it would take hours upon hours to have any hope of getting the pads clean, and as soon as the machine spends 30 mins at the next job they will be just as full again.
     
  8. skyking1

    skyking1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2020
    Messages:
    152
    Location:
    washington
    you do have that going for you. Here, it does approach freezing during the daytime thaws.
     
  9. Jonas302

    Jonas302 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2015
    Messages:
    696
    Location:
    mn
    If the hoe is your only load consider making guide rails on the inside of the tracks
    Winter gets sketchy whether you clean the pads or not outriggers are a pain and if she gets sliding they may not help last ones we had were 3" white oak around 10 feet long a little taller than the deck to try to keep things on the trailer
     
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  10. Shimmy1

    Shimmy1 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2014
    Messages:
    2,814
    Location:
    North Dakota
    It absolutely is possible. I've had to knock the pads off 4 times in one day before. It pretty much is the worst day of your life if you are alone, luckily I had Dad there that worked one side while I worked the other. 8 lb sledge knocks the pads clean. Yes, they are packed full again in 30 minutes, but if you've ever slid off a trailer and laid one over on the cab, you will make sure they are clean before crawling up the ramps ever again.
     
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  11. skyking1

    skyking1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2020
    Messages:
    152
    Location:
    washington
    "If the hoe is your only load consider making guide rails on the inside of the tracks"

    great idea. Maybe build some rails and sockets for them, like stake sides. I remember sliding off a tilt trailer many years ago in winter with a small dozer. Not so much fun. No harm but less drama is always welcome.
     
  12. skyking1

    skyking1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2020
    Messages:
    152
    Location:
    washington
    I did one job on clay that it took us 3 hours to get most of it out. The job was a Cat dealer, the whole building was on grade beams because of that clay. I had to cover the "Deere" logo on the boom and counterweight to dig the job. They could have provided a Cat for me? :D