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Mini Concrete Chrusher

Nac

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Sep 19, 2004
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566
Location
NJ
Occupation
Construction
I saw this web site while surfing. Red Rhino This looks very intresting it would be great for the house demos and garages i nock down saving me on continer fees. Was wondering if this machine can be rented out to other contractors. It cost about 55,000 i figure you can rent it out for 500 a day min. plus most lickly you are going to need support equipment a mini x with a grapple for a nother 500 a day. What do you think or this thing just a toy.
 

dayexco

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May 21, 2005
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1,224
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south dakota
That machine is TOOOOOOOOO cool!....we do a lot of parking lot demo jobs, acre or less, that machine would be perfect for what we want it for. only 55K for that?
 

dayexco

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May 21, 2005
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south dakota
after looking at the website, it looks like they're coming up with 2 larger models, the 45 ton per hr. one i think would fit our needs pretty good
 

CascadeScaper

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Feb 27, 2005
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Lynnwood, WA
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2nd year Operating Engineer Apprentice
That thing looks awesome! Definately a great little machine. We don't do much demo but if we did that would be on my wish list. Check out the demonstration video, pretty cool.
 
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Nac

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Sep 19, 2004
Messages
566
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NJ
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Construction
They sent me the whole product specs and a DVD on it. The only thing is that the crusher opening is 18" x 8" so all the concrete would have to be reduced to that size having to have a hammer on the job to reduce some concrete to feed it into the crusher. No problem for me since i have one but if you try to rent out the machine you will most likely need the crusher, the mini x with a grapple and hammer so you are looking at 1,500 a day would a cocntractor pay that a day.
 

bobcatuser

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Dec 26, 2005
Messages
89
Location
Richmond BC
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Excavation Contractor
I have seen the mobile crushers Hitachi make, they rent for $500 a day and are rated at 40 tonne per hour. In the Vancouver area there are many asphalt plants and recycling yards that will take clean asphalt or concrete rubble for free. Recycled 3/4" minus sells for $6-$7.50 tonne. On some big demo jobs the contractor will bring in a mobile crusher and give away the 4" minus if you send a truck to pick it up.
 

digger242j

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Oct 31, 2003
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Southwestern PA
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Self employed excavator
The only thing is that the crusher opening is 18" x 8" so all the concrete would have to be reduced to that size having to have a hammer on the job to reduce some concrete to feed it into the crusher.

I dunno. That sounds pretty labor intensive. Think in terms of how many pieces that hammer would need to make--if the opening were twice that size (36" X 16"), you could put a piece that big into it. But, for the smaller opening, you'd have to break that 36 X 16 piece not in half, but into fourths, and hope that they all ended up roughly equal. In other words, as the size of the opening gets smaller, the number of pieces you need to make, and the effort required to make them, increases geometrically. That just seems like a lot of hammer work...
 
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tylermckee

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Jan 9, 2006
Messages
768
Location
washington
Seems like the opening is a little small, you have to really bust the stuff up before you can run it through the machine. seems like it would work great though once you hammerd the crap out of it.
 

Steve Frazier

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Oct 30, 2003
Messages
6,687
Location
LaGrangeville, N.Y.
My only concern is they don't mention rebar. I didn't see any in the concrete they were crushing either. I'd want to determine how the machine handles rebar before I'd consider anything, nearly all the stuff I remove has rebar or wire in it.
 

Squizzy246B

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Sep 9, 2005
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Perth, Western Australia
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Digger Driver
I guess it would be the ducks proverbials for bricks and pavers but the concrete, as mentioned, would be another matter. I believe these types/size machines are the way to go in the future. If you look around at screening plants for example, they are big and difficult to move, and they cost a $$$$$$$$$. On some of the smaller lots we do there is often tons of dirt taken away just because its mixed up with all the crap. A small plant the size of that crusher, fed by a skid, will become viable I believe.

We are already having some restrictions placed on our resources and dump fees are not going to get any cheaper. I can see how this machine would be great just not how you could make it pay its way...Yet.
 

itsgottobegreen

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Joined
Nov 1, 2005
Messages
180
Location
Maryland
it says it can crush rebar. :drinkup

"Reinforced concrete & Steel
For steel and reinforced concrete it is recommended that you protect your conveyor belt and crush this material having
removed the conveyor – this takes approximately 6 minutes."
 

Dozerboy

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Jan 18, 2006
Messages
2,232
Location
TX
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Operator
I have worked a lot with crushers and unless you could use the crushing’s on site it would be a waste. Also think of how may time you may have to handle it: size it, stock pile it, crush it, then place it or export. And steel is a bigger PITA making sure there not pieces sticking out of the sides of the concrete, picking out the steel, and flat tires. And a crusher is a very high maintaince.
 

stuvecorp

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Joined
Jan 8, 2006
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307
Location
lake wissota, wisconsin
Looks cool, if I had extra money it would probably go for the size that could do 45 tons per hour. The thing looks like a overgrown copy machine but for the right conditions it might be the ticket.
 

NJ Demo

New Member
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Nov 1, 2006
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3
Location
Marlton, NJ
Mini- Crushers

I have seen the Eco-Crusher down in Atlantic City seemed like it was a good product. The company using it was American Demolition, he is on the cover of WHEN Mag. Would like to know if anyone has any experience with it. I know this thread is old but searched for it, if it gets the cover must be pretty credible, right?

Also the Red Rhino seems prety good especially in parking garages where I have to figure out a different method of doing things everytime.:confused:
 

Flash2004

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Aug 18, 2008
Messages
40
Location
New Zealand
Occupation
Boss
Nakayama/Yanmar

I've seen one of these red Rhinos working at a demonstration Expo in Sydney Australia and was completely disillusioned following from what I hoped to see based on their web site.

If you need a small site crusher like this and you can find one, go for the Nakayama/Yanmar 4.5 tonne models. Such professionally designed and made little crushers in comparison. They'll close down to 3/4" too but the intake size is similar.

There's one here in New Zealand done 6500 hours working in remote locations and usually flown in by helicopter. No major repairs in that time either and only one set of repacement jaw and cheek plates. The Rhino would have shaken iself to bits in a quarter of that time.

Best bet is the Komatsu BR100J which weighs only 10 tonnes and we've had 35-45 meters per hour out of them on different jobs at 65mm output even when wet feed is all you can find. A very good model.

We've had the Hitachi HR240G as well but no power in comparison, it'll stall on bigger, harder rock. cheers

I have seen the Eco-Crusher down in Atlantic City seemed like it was a good product. The company using it was American Demolition, he is on the cover of WHEN Mag. Would like to know if anyone has any experience with it. I know this thread is old but searched for it, if it gets the cover must be pretty credible, right?

Also the Red Rhino seems prety good especially in parking garages where I have to figure out a different method of doing things everytime.:confused:
 

stumpjumper83

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Jan 13, 2007
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Port Allegany, pa
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Movin dirt
Flash, what type of cost are you getting into replaceing a set of jaws and cheek platesfor that nakayama? Also how are they for getting parts for? I'm looking at getting a small crusher for hadling flagstone scraps.
 

Flash2004

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Aug 18, 2008
Messages
40
Location
New Zealand
Occupation
Boss
Flash, what type of cost are you getting into replaceing a set of jaws and cheek platesfor that nakayama? Also how are they for getting parts for? I'm looking at getting a small crusher for hadling flagstone scraps.

I was quoting a customer of ours experience with the Nakayama and not our own. We own a lot of crushers but usually only hire them out for about 1000 hours before they sell. We've only owned one Nakayama 55 and it didn't need jaw plates etc. at only 200 hours when I bought it, so I can't say for sure what they might cost.

I buy a few jaw and cheek plates though for all the different models we have and have had before, so I'd hazard a guess at say $600 - $800 each for the fixed and swing jaws and about $400 each for the cheek plates. I'd get some replacement cheek plates laser cut locally from Bisalloy or Hardox 400 to save freight costs, they're usually a little bit cheaper then.

If you have a Nakayama nd seem to be getting charged a bit too severely for your jaws I can get a price fro new ones from Japan. Send me a pm? cheers, Gordon
 

Flash2004

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Aug 18, 2008
Messages
40
Location
New Zealand
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Boss
Just read your post properly, didn't notice you hadn't bought a crusher yet. Just a suggestion; when it comes to buying a crusher, especially a jaw crusher, the cost of replacement parts like the jaws etc. are usually the least of your worries because they should last 1000-2000 hours.

The Nakayama is most likely sold in the US as a Yanmar or possibly even Kubota, they share the engines, control banks etc. and track hydraulics etc. with most of their digger or small loader range so will be readily available. Nakayama - who only make the actual crusher element itself - has been around forever and even then use the likes of SKF bearings etc. inside. I think I'd have any part I wanted inside of a week and I wouldn't buy them from the local dealer necessarily - unless he's offering good value.
 
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