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Methane gas dangers!

Discussion in 'Safety Issues' started by oldtanker, Sep 27, 2016.

  1. oldtanker

    oldtanker Senior Member

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    vining mn
    Not in construction but on the farm there have been 2 deaths attributed to methane gas in the last couple of weeks. Lot of earth work has a methane danger so I thought I'd post this to make people aware.

    1: Farmer put an agitator in a manure lagoon prior to pumping it out to spread. You normally leave them run 24 hours or more depending on the size of the lagoon. The next morning was foggy and the farmer went to check the lagoon. They think the fog held the methane in and he inhaled enough to kill him.

    2: Farm worker spreading liquid manure apparently stopped in the field to relieve himself by the rear of the spreader and he too got enough methane to kill him.

    For you guys doing earthwork: Be aware of surroundings. Old farmsteads and landfills are particularly prove to have a source of methane as well as old septic and sewer systems! Methane itself in odorless! And it doesn't take much to kill.

    Rick
     
  2. lantraxco

    lantraxco Senior Member

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    That's crazy sad... I suppose it's heavy enough it pools in low spots?
     
  3. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    http://www.agupdate.com/crops/liqui...cle_6c7c0104-babf-5e02-9716-1f49c1949fb1.html

    Here's a good article on the #1 incident. The article states that the coroner determined it was hydrogen sulfide gas, not methane. Hydrogen sulfide is heavier than air and fairly toxic, methane mostly displaces air in this context. The weather was extremely weird that day, cool foggy air at the surface and warmer air above and extremely still. Unusual to be overcome in a situation like that in open air. Confined spaces are the most common site for these deaths from sewer gas. Silos and septic tanks are two other things to be extremely careful entering, as well as sewers obviously.
     
  4. redneckracin

    redneckracin Senior Member

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    Ditto, check your facts op. Methane has a SG of much less than 1 and therefore easily rises quickly in all situations. I worked in the coal mines (mine foreman) and the gas patch(Environmental Engineer) and I'd agree with the hydrogen sulfide. (stink damp) that is probably what got him. One good breath at a decently low concentration can instantly cause death.
     
  5. thepumpguysc

    thepumpguysc Senior Member

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    Yeah Rick.. What were you thinking, trying to save other peoples lives.. :stirthepot:crazy
     
  6. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    Public officials generally say sewer gas, journalists hear methane cause that's trendy. Methane is the least of your worries IN THESE SITUATIONS, lack of oxygen or H2SO4 is what kills.
     
  7. RZucker

    RZucker Senior Member

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    I remember back in the mid 70s we had a neighbor 5-6 houses down the road that had a root cellar with a few boxes of rotting potatoes, he went down inside and didn't come back out on his own. Not sure what gas got him, but it was a day or two before he was found.
     
  8. simonsrplant

    simonsrplant Senior Member

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    Occupation:
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    Location:
    Alberta CANADA
    Thanks for the share. Hopefully that quick memo will save one or more lives and one or more less families broken...