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meanwhile back at the farm....

Discussion in 'Agricultural Operations' started by stock, Jul 28, 2009.

  1. stock

    stock Senior Member

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    Well was off today so I called to the farm to see how the agri fraternity were getting on,between repairing projects and doing grass maintenance to keep a fresh pick ahead of the bovine's with this jd1360
    DSCF0643.jpg

    this happened
    DSCF0642.jpg

    Which resulted in this

    DSCF0641.jpg

    and lot of this :crying:crying:crying as the tyre was 6mts old and cost nearly €1000 to replace so now it off to see if it can be repaired...
     
  2. dozerdave

    dozerdave Well-Known Member

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    Hi Stock,

    That tire would ruin my day.
     
  3. hvy 1ton

    hvy 1ton Senior Member

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    Had one of those disks break like that before, luckily the rock i hit kept the chunk from becoming a projectile. That tire scares me, i'm gonna be mowing while in the "duck" position from now on. :D
     
  4. AtlasRob

    AtlasRob Senior Member

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    Jeez that sucks!

    I suppose the only positive is that it was the tyre and not a person, still frightening to see.

    If your real lucky they might be able to do a major repair on it as its so new and a clean cut rather than an explosive shredded hole.
     
  5. North Texan

    North Texan Well-Known Member

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    Deer antlers are hard on tires, too.:Banghead
     
  6. trukfan

    trukfan Well-Known Member

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    That's gotta be hard to stomach on a new tire. Hopefully, your tire guy will be able to boot the gash. On the last set of tires we had on one of out tractors, we somehow got a 3" long, vertical slice in the sidewall of the tire. It was on the inside, towards the cab, and our tire guy dismounted the tire, but a boot and and some patches over it on the inside, and aired it back up. Worked good for 3 years until the tires were wore out. I'm assuming you're running a tube in the tire already, so hopefully it'll work.
     
  7. Richardjw~

    Richardjw~ Senior Member

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    what about getting a pasture topper? I was under the impression that running those disc mower beds for prolonged periods of time with load/no-load will lead to a short life
     
  8. stock

    stock Senior Member

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    As a machinery person I was of the same opinion but on the countless occasions that I tried to explain this I was told on every occasion that the regrowth was far superior after the disc mower,in conclusion I must mention he has a pasture topper in the yard .
     
  9. Richardjw~

    Richardjw~ Senior Member

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    in fact it would be worth chucking some new saucers at that mower......the one on the left (right as you look at pic) also looks like it's had some weld-repairs.....chances are if it breaks it will go right beside the weld
     
  10. stock

    stock Senior Member

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    that was also pointed out but maybe the timing was a bit off as I was threatened with all sorts of violence and a great lad for pointing out the obvious ...so I said well if it so obvious how did this happen ??? and through the growling and gnashing of teeth a shotgun was mentioned as well as some grievous bodily harm to my ample personage ,....Just goes to show you can't put and old hear on young shoulders

    I learned years ago with a **** of a JD1327 mower to check the discs before you left a paddock; other wise you could be walking a lot of swaths looking for a disc as they were always shearing the mounting spigot ,and then you had to split the bed to replace it as well as timing the bed and trying to seal it and only put in 2lts of oil .. PAINFUL

    i personally would not have used the mower in the condition it is currently in .....but I am not a farmer..
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2009
  11. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    Logic and common wits indicates his farmer skills are a bit lacking as well. :cool:
     
  12. stock

    stock Senior Member

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    No Actually he quite a good farmer knows the genealogy of the herd good with the grassland management great patience with the cows ,something I never had
    he cant stand oil or grease so much so he never uses it, me I cant stand cow crap or the smell of it,but have no complaints with the oil or grease ,having said that I can milk a cow feed calves and do most jobs on a farm but it's not what I chose to do,just love digging and building stuff ,I get a kick when I pass something I had a part of constructing or a little let down when I see a project being abused with graffiti especially when the client broke my heart for a high finish but c'est la vie
     
  13. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    That makes sense, stock. But one would think, in order to operate the farm, it goes beyond managing the animals and land, you have to have the equipment. Yep, that would involve all manner of oil, grease, busted knuckles, and every sort of uncomfortable position. So it seems curious to me that he resisted your advice on the needed repairs. If he doesn't have a love for the repair work, I would think he would be more than happy to take advantage of your skills in this department. :)
     
  14. Richardjw~

    Richardjw~ Senior Member

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    thing is though Atco the fact of the matter is that you can really divide farmers in to three groups, those that look after their machinery and have no stock, those that look after their machinery and have good stock skills and those that have excellent stock skills (as Stock pointed out this guy knows the entire genealogy of his herd - the milk yields of his herd are probably phenomenal) and zero attention and comprehension to machinery and servicing.....that's the way it is.....I have seen it all before in my days as a field service engineer in U.K. and have often walked away shaking my head at the lack of attention.....at the end of the day it;'s broken and they pay someone to fix it.
     
  15. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    Wow, that's some good info you and stock have offered. I'm not around farms much so don't know much about their habits. And I understand what your saying; the farmer can range from a person who is a jack of all trades that can do anything on his farm, to a person who knows the stock and ag part of the farm like an expert but couldn't tell the difference between a screwdriver and a lug wrench. Thanks for the info guys. ;)
     
  16. stock

    stock Senior Member

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    Well he is also one of the finest block layers you have seen (Never trained)and for carpentry,well he is lets say capable of roofing a shed with a whittling knife,well for me hate timber ,maybe that's wrong, loathe it! would be right ,firewood is as much as I want to do with the stuff ,but steel well that's different; could make nearly anything out of the stuff cut it, bend it, weld it, play with the stuff all day , takes all breeds and creeds to make the world I suppose.....
     
  17. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    Well, stock, sounds like the chap is a rather interesting character...I can see why you stop by "the farm" to see what's going on. :D I seem to share your same sentiments; if it's wood...can't do a durn thing with it. But if it requires a torch, grinder, and welder...I can do something with that. Sounds crazy, but I can tollerate sparks going into the old boxers more than I can the sawdust gettin' in my eyes from a circular saw. ;)
     
  18. OneWelder

    OneWelder Senior Member

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    Stock you might try a Recapper , rather than just a tire service guy - Recappers can section some pretty bad slices and would be a stronger fix than a boot
    Atcoequip
    I usually gage a farmer by how many nails have replaced cotter pins
     
  19. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    LoL, I freely admit I'm clueless about farming practices, but I find this a fascinating thread and subject. :)
     
  20. Cretebaby

    Cretebaby Senior Member

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    I find that a double head nail works best. :laugh