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Mahogany?

Discussion in 'Trailers' started by Truk, Dec 14, 2018.

  1. Truk

    Truk New Member

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    Any thoughts about using Mahogany for decking on a 60 ton tilt deck trailer??
    Thanks!
     
  2. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    It's good and beautiful wood but I would think very expensive.
     
  3. petepilot

    petepilot Senior Member

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    $$$$$$$$$$$
     
  4. Mother Deuce

    Mother Deuce Senior Member

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    Apitong or purple heart, but bring money.
     
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  5. 525isx

    525isx Well-Known Member

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    cottonwood. once dry, makes excellent lowboy decking &dump box side boards
     
  6. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    I wouldn't have ever known about cottonwood. I've had it for fire wood and it turned concky before it ever dried and was soft as cork. It there some way to dry it that it stays solid?
     
  7. excavator

    excavator Senior Member

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    Years ago I was given some short pieces of mahogany 4x4s and thought they would make good blocking. But they are to hard and end up breaking/chipping when a load is put on them. Like was said above, you need a softer wood like cottonwood ect. for a trailer deck.
     
  8. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    I need to find out what we use for blocking. It's one of the many species of local hardwood and all I know is that it's darned heavy. A 4ft length of 8" x 8" blocking needs 2 guys to lift it.
    I never knew what purpleheart was either until I came down here. Apparently it has a dried density of somewhere over 50 lbs/cubic foot ........
     
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  9. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    If you can find anyone to cut it Sycamore, never really dries out, grabs water like a sponge but cross grained like a Hemp Rope and hard to tear up.
     
  10. StanRUS

    StanRUS Senior Member

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  11. Ct Farmer

    Ct Farmer Well-Known Member

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    I don't know what kind of cottonwood you have but the stuff we have around here is half dead while it is still standing and once it hits the ground rots faster than you can cut it. We cut them down and let 'em rot just to keep them from falling on us. Total garbage.

    It is heavy but around here a lot of white oak for trailer decks. Red oak checks too much. If you can find it and keep it straight I would think hickory with its spiral grain would make a tough deck.
     
  12. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    Cottonwood will rot for most of the country unless you keep it indoors, I wonder why it works in WESTERN Washington? It is quite tough for it's weight, you just need much thicker planks than other woods.

    Take a look at the drop numbers on the Forest Products labratory table, certain varieties of Ash, Hickory and Elm do well. Black Locust does well also, and is the most durable wood for not rotting.
     
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  13. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    The only thing I can think of here is that we are talking two different types of tree with the same name. The tree I'm familiar with is like what Ct. Farmer is talking about. It grows big fast, drops that cotton looking crap in the spring and the big limbs drop off in a wet breeze taking out power and phone lines pretty regular. I had to cut up a wind fall on my mother's property years ago that had exploded about three feet off the ground after a freeze and then a wind storm. The chain saw was throwing out a fog from all the water the tree had in it. Stuff was so soft I had to hold back on the chain saw or it would pack the sprocket and jamb the chain.
     
  14. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    I think we're talking about the same cottonwood, it does make nice planks when it's dry. A rough sawn cottonwood plank on a scaffold will be lighter and stiffer than southern yellow pine or hem/fir. The cottonwood will be 2"+ and the others will be finished 1 1/2". The stiffness is from the thickness. Cottonwood will also be tougher because it's a hardwood (though softer) and the unique grain of cottonwood, vs Ash that would like to split like Douglas fir. That's why I'd like to say Elm, it will stand up to a beating better than Oak, Ash, Hickory, but it's not rot resistant like white oak or black locust.
     
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  15. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Cottonwood and sycamore here are tough to find anyone that will mill down, cross grained, generally wet and swells with heat of cutting. Once cut and installed on a trailer is some tough stuff especially if treat with linseed oil or even waste motor oil. So long as does not make direct earth contact to draw moisture from below and rot will last a good long time, grousers do get a grip on cottonwood where slip on oak. I have Black and Honey Locust on the farm, Honey will rot once dropped, Black is a great deal slower but will eventually pith up on the edges.
     
  16. Ct Farmer

    Ct Farmer Well-Known Member

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    Well it appears that somehow cottonwood might actually have a use. I sure would like to find one as some of these are 2' or more in diameter and being cheap I hate to waste it.

    Clearing for our new pond soon and will likely try to get some of milled. Google tells me it is good for trailer decks, animal stalls, fence, even siding. Who woulda guessed it. From what I read you need a blade with a lot of set and lots of rakers. Mill it green I assume, dry it and oil.
     
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  17. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Check with the local mills, sawyers are generally apprehensive as to cutting Cottonwood as noted.
     
  18. TVA

    TVA Senior Member

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    Just FYI - there’s lumber mill in Stockton AL ( don’t remember name if it right now ) that supplies some imported wood species for decking instead of Redwood to military.
     
  19. Truk

    Truk New Member

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    Well the county did deck the whole thing with Mahogany...
    It's hard as a rock, and the excavator doesn't grip it whatsoever- to the point of being dangerously "slick"
    Soooooo now we've covered it with old screen belting.
     
  20. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    OWIEE!!!