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Looking to talk to Operators/Mechanics of Heavy Equipment Machinery

Discussion in 'General Industry Questions' started by I<3_CE_Equipment, May 3, 2021.

  1. I<3_CE_Equipment

    I<3_CE_Equipment New Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2021
    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Hi! I am an engineering student who is super passionate about heavy equipment machinery and I was hoping to maybe get some of my questions answered here as I have no expertise in operating heavy equipment.

    1> Is there a standard pre-operative check that mechanics and operators do regardless of the machine model or brand?

    2> What is the main difference between the routine checks operators do before operating machinery and the check that the mechanics do in the pre-use inspection check? >Is there one uniform check that everyone does regardless if they are a mechanic or operator?

    3> During these checks how often is the data indicated on the cab dashboard used? Is it used to diagnose sensor problems or is there some other indicator?

    4> Is there anything that comes to mind that can be added or any information that can be made more transparent to help understand the uptime or downtime of a machine - and decrease ultimate cost and frustrations?

    Thank you for welcoming me.
    -J
     
  2. 12ValveHyundai

    12ValveHyundai Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2020
    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    B.C. Canada
    Make sure the tracks are still on it and giver till she blows? I think the clipboard warrior types off of mining and pipelining are more into this stuff than operators.
     
  3. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    Messages:
    9,263
    Occupation:
    Machinery & Equipment Appraiser
    Location:
    Northwest
    The "Normal" checks an operator would be making are generally only fluid levels on easily checked items like engine oil, engine coolant level, transmission oil level, hydraulic oil level and fuel and DEF levels. They would then be assumed to look around the machine for damage and hazards that might affect personnel on site or the machine. In my experience, operators most of the times catch problems when the machine does operate normally.

    Mechanic inspections would be performed under the definition of maintenance. It means you are looking for problems in the process of changing fluids and filters, possibly taking fluid samples, measuring wear and making operational adjustments.

    There are other reasons and procedures for performing mechanic inspections. A new machine delivery inspection is usually going through a machine checking for items the final assembly people at the factory might have missed. An appraisal condition inspection on a used machine offered for purchase might be something else entirely different. Generally, people put together inspection forms to ensure all the desired checks and inspections are accomplished. Some forms are specific to a type of machine. Others are generic and can be edited to fit any type of machine.

    If you are interested you can send me a PM and I'll send you my generic inspection form used for appraising machines offered for purchase.
     
    skyking1, Coaldust and HardRockNM like this.
  4. cuttin edge

    cuttin edge Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2014
    Messages:
    1,447
    Occupation:
    Finish grader operator
    Location:
    NB Canada
    We have weekly reports that have to be passed in. Just hours on Monday, and a generic checklist. More for safety than mechanical problems. It's a government required thing, like a pretrip inspection in a truckers log. It does however have a space on the bottom where you can list any concerns about the machine. On machines I run all the time, I check the oil on Monday morning. Older machines or a machine I am not familliar with, I check levels more often until I am sure of any leaks or consumption. Most coolant systems have a transparent tank, that you can glance at. If there are no leaks, I leave the transmission on my Volvo grader for the mechanic to check during service. Greasing the machine is a good time to find problems. Tires, damaged hoses. Do not run many track machines, so I just look for leaks or obvious breaks.
     
    Jonas302 likes this.
  5. Coaldust

    Coaldust Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2011
    Messages:
    962
    Occupation:
    Cargo Tanks
    Location:
    Wasilla and parts unknown
    Welcome to the HEF!

    Glad these guys are helping you out.

    1. Yes. The manufacturers provide well documented practices and procedures for pre-op inspection. Sometimes the organization that owns the machine has their own, company procedure. In the United States, sometimes the Fed and/state governments have their own requirements depending upon what sort of machine it is.

    2. The operator vs Technician practices can be the same or vastly different depending on what kind of machine you are talking about. Some operations don’t trust the operator to do anything but turn the steering wheel.

    3. I think in most cases, the hour meter and/or odometer is used often to record the beginning of the shift. The Check Engine Light or Malfunction Indicator Light are also important. Some machines can provide instant detailed data to the operator, other machines don’t provide any data.
     
  6. Victoria Luper

    Victoria Luper New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2021
    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Bogalusa, La

    Hi, I need help. Nothing was wrong with my dozer except the engine gauge wasn’t working. I took the old one off and tried to replace it and my blade nor my tracks will move so I put the only one back on and the blade will work ever now and again but the tracks still will not. Not sure if it’s a safety thing or a wire is messed up. HELP. ANYTHING WOULD HELP
     
  7. Victoria Luper

    Victoria Luper New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2021
    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Bogalusa, La
    Hi, I need help. Nothing was wrong with my dozer except the engine gauge wasn’t working. I took the old one off and tried to replace it and my blade nor my tracks will move so I put the only one back on and the blade will work ever now and again but the tracks still will not. Not sure if it’s a safety thing or a wire is messed up. HELP. ANYTHING WOULD HELP
     
  8. Tarhe Driver

    Tarhe Driver Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2015
    Messages:
    183
    Occupation:
    Comm. Real Est Appraiser-Retired cargo/helo pilot
    Location:
    Savannah, GA
    Welcome to HEF, Victoria Luper. I am merely a long-time lurker, but maybe I can get your question to the right folks.

    From the HEG home page, click

    Forums,

    Earthmoving Equipment,

    Dozers,

    Post New Thread -- And give it a thread title that partly defines your problem, such as "Removed Engine gauge; now dozer won't move."

    Then copy your old message into the new thread, but add your dozer model & serial number (very, very important), as the thousands of contributors on HEF each have unique experience, albeit often there's common knowledge.

    When you have a new problem, always start a new thread, always with your dozer serial number and model number.

    Again, welcome to a group of extraordinary aiders. You'll be glad you joined.

    Make it a great day,

    Tarhe Driver
     
    JPV likes this.