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Load line camera

Discussion in 'Cranes' started by Natman, May 2, 2021.

  1. muzy

    muzy Well-Known Member

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    That looks really good for the price. But for any price I don't se how it could be better.
    Nice and clear, bit of glare on the monitor. Looks very workable. Well done.
    Was just joking with the Cha ching comment.
     
  2. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    Did a job today for one of my best HVAC guys, and was telling him about the new camera system while I was working blind (but with a good signaler) on a high commercial roof. The signaler was also the rigger, so he'd disappear for a bit, then re-appear after he got the HVAC rigged. I told the boss man on the ground, standing by my cab door, "OK, he's got it hooked up, here he comes" just as the signaler came into view again. It was not needed at all, just a parlor trick, to illustrate it's potential usage. Another time he stopped me swinging, but I could see I was off center a couple feet, and I told the boss man "watch, before I winch up, he's going to have me swing to the left a bit more," just as he signaled exactly that. One minor plus, I was able to see when I was rigged to the last load, so I didn't have to ask, (they never tell me, I have to yell/ask) as I like to suck the boom in on the last load as opposed to winching down, just to save a bit of time in getting wrapped up and outa there.
    Setting trusses today also, working half blind, I was able to see when the one unseen nail bender had his stabilizer nailed in place on his side, there is just a lot more situational awareness now with this setup. I am working out how much to utilize it....., today I could have told the HVAC signaler there was no need to run back and forth to signal me, he could have done it right by the load, under my camera, same thing! I did tell him afterward, so maybe next time we will let the camera do the work more.
     
    John C., Tradesman and dirty4fun like this.
  3. FarmWrench

    FarmWrench Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
    Table Potato farmer
    Location:
    Chaffee NY
    My neighbor has a drone which has some features that could solve some problems. The drone can be told to "follow" and/or "circle" a target. If aimed at the corner of a truss it's possible that the gimbal could give confirmation of proper placement.

    It wasn't terrible expensive (less than $500) and it's survived all kinds of stupidity.

    If positive opinion is expressed I'll dig up his YouTube channel with lots of footage.
     
    John C. likes this.
  4. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    I have the camera dialed in perfectly, this morning as I set a 40' sheeted gable 60' away, with not being able to see the end wall or the two nail benders on the plate line (normally, I would have had to stop and yell at them "hey guys, I can't see thru OSB, and you're not giving me any signals, and I'm not telepathic"), today I just kept booming down/cabling up until the camera told me to stop. After I had winched down to make contact, they got to bracing it without any calls to tip it one or the other, so right where it should be! This thing is a huge stress reliever and a voice saver, and the picture quality today was finally everything I had imagined, sharp, clear, no lag time, just perfect.

    Having this setup, AND a remote release like Tradesman uses on his truss jobs, is something I am next considering, though i have yet to hear back from the US distributor of the unit he has, I may go domestic, a competing brand that also looks like it works well. I'll post a few pictures in a day or so, just remember it's a cell phone pic of a TV screen.
     
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  5. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    Keep in mind the actual picture quality is much better than these cell phone pics of the my cab receiver shows.
    Some sheeted gable work, can't see squat, no signalers, typical, it's a godsend for them. Working on a log home, picking off the stack working in the blind, piece of cake now. Watching the carpenter (blind again) nail his stabilizer, after he get's his second nail in I can see it's time to cable down, I can watch him unhook me and also see that my chain rigging is free of the truss before I boom outa there.
     

    Attached Files:

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  6. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    More pics: IMG_20210712_074457158.jpg
     
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  7. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    I'm doing a big HVAC job at the local high school, with a contractor I work with often. He stays by the parapet wall long enough to get me in the general area, and in my camera's field of view, and then disappears! But now I am watching him on the camera....and the final let down of the 1200 pounds units is just like normal: real slow line speed the last couple inches, lightly touchdown while giving him time to double check the way it's sitting, then down all the way.

    Late yesterday we had to stop for a big thunderstorm to roll thru, and as I don't have it waterproofed yet I just took it off (one nut, pull two wires). When we started back up I couldn't get it boot up, so we set two units without it and it was patently clear what an advantage having it was. Sure, in a perfect world, with plenty of help, it wouldn't be needed, but he was shorthanded and it made all the difference. Before we did a third unit without the camera, I discovered why it was not working. I had left the lens cap on!
     
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  8. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    Learned something while wrapping up the HVAC job at the high school: the boom tip dipped below the parapet wall, which is grout filled cinder block, and that blocked the camera's transmitter and I went blind. While my HVAC guy wondered why I didn't respond to his signals It occurred to me the next time I use the camera in this fashion, arrange beforehand that 2 taps of my horn will signal that I lost the signal for whatever reason and that we have to revert to hand signals face to face. My receiver antennas (3 of them, same with the transmitter, something to do with video quality/lag time) are in my cab, mounted about the same level as the LMI, on the rear of my 10" monitor, just to keep the install as simple as possible. Wood framing doesn't effect the signal at all, doesn't blind me, and in this case I had all 110' of stick out, maybe with less stick it would still signal thru the masonry. If it was a chronic problem, I could mount the antennas out on the boom or even higher up in the cab, but it would mean a less clean install, so as long as it works 99.9% of the time I'll keep it like it is.
     
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  9. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    For the first time ever, I let my boom inadvertently contact something (OSB with 2x6 framing, no harm to the boom at all). It happened after a 9.5 hour day setting trusses on a monster 2 story house that was perched on a hill, and while the previous 3 hours I had 104' of stick out, in order to get the needed reach over the height of the house and being forced to set up right near it, I had thought we were done. So I swung the boom around to the front and had sucked it in to about 50' when the builder then asked me if I could lift up some small bundles of jacks before putting it away. After he told me they would be going into a room close to me, so no need to run the boom way out again, I went ahead and started to do so. Only after we all heard a CRUNCH, did I realize that while I was staring at the 10" monitor, and only lowering the load in the tight spot (and the entire crew of 4 was watching the load, none watching my boom, including me) as it slowly rotated in such a way to fit, (inside an octangle room no less) that I had neglected to pay attention to my boom clearance.

    It took me an hour or so to fully realize what had happened and why. Normally, pre boom tip camera, my eyeballs would have prevented it, as I'd be looking out at the boom/load (if I could see it.) Now, I was distracted by the monitor. It reminds me of when I'm backing up and looking at my in the driver cab backup camera's screen, (not my mirrors) and then I see some obstruction narrowly miss ripping a mirror off. Too much information, or at least more then I was used to, and I now make sure to continue to scan the mirrors while also using the backup camera, and I will do the same with my boom and the new camera. The crew were not concerned at all about the slightly buggered up framing, as during the previous truss set I was working totally blind and the camera's capability was blowing their minds, they were experienced enough to see it's advantages out weighed a 10 minute repair job on the framing. I was of course lucky to get this wake up call, without any damage, lesson learned.
     
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