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Lime treating soil

Discussion in 'General Industry Questions' started by Palmer78, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. Palmer78

    Palmer78 Well-Known Member

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    I'm putting an estimate together to lime treat some horse paddocks and had a question about how to compact it. I'll be scarrifying 6-8 inches, adding the lime, tilling it in 6-8 inches deep, adding water, and compacting. I was wondering what equipment I should use to get the best compaction. At just 6-8 inches I'm figuring on using a smooth drum roller (no sheepsfoot). Is it better to vibrate, or just roll? I'm also not sure exactly how much water to add to the lime/soil mix. If anyone has any experience doing this then please chime in. I'll be happy to hear any suggestions.
     
  2. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair...Palmer78. Tell us more...this is a new carry on to me, what does the lime do to the soil and how much are you applying?

    Cheers.
     
  3. d9gdon

    d9gdon Senior Member

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    Howdy,
    That lime will eat your water, all you gotta do is spread it thin and water it and it'll heat up and turn that stuff to loam. We're doing it to clay that has a PI of 58 - 60 and it will spread like the best sandy topsoil you've ever seen. It will turn to rock in a 1000 years or so.
     
  4. Dozerboy

    Dozerboy Senior Member

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    A smooth drum with vibration will be fine and it will take quite a bit of water.
     
  5. Turbo21835

    Turbo21835 Senior Member

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    Here you go scrub http://www.mtcsg.com/content/view/23/51/
     
  6. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair...Thanks Turbo. What threw me was the reference to "horse paddocks" in the original post...I sorta associate horse paddocks with pasture.

    I have stabalised road-base with cement and fly ash and have crushed and spread hundreds of tons of limestone on pasture and sugar cane paddocks and I can't get my head around what Palmer78 is actualy planning to do.

    There is talk of compaction which is the last thing we would do on pasture...then d9gdon mentions that the lime will turn "stuff to loam"...what are we doing here...growing grass or stabilising wet areas?

    Cheers.
     
  7. Turbo21835

    Turbo21835 Senior Member

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    Probably providing solid footing for the horses in a barn yard area, at least that is my guess.
     
  8. hvy 1ton

    hvy 1ton Senior Member

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    Depends on if we're talking ag lime or quick lime. Altho i've never seen ag lime do anything but adjust the ph.
     
  9. Palmer78

    Palmer78 Well-Known Member

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    The horse paddocks are just fenced areas where horses are kept. There is no grass there but lots of mud in the winter. The owner wanted to lime treat the paddocks in order to stabilize the areas so the horses aren't slopping around in the mud so much. But the owner has decided to skip the lime treatment idea for now.
     
  10. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair...thanks Palmer. That's clarified things a bit... I reckon the bloke would be a bit optimistic though hoping to improve the situation just with lime.

    Your soils may be different but I have never seen any place that would work over here in Oz.

    Cheers.
     
  11. CRAFT

    CRAFT Senior Member

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    Thanx for this link Turbo ! ........ I think I may have just picked something up from this great info centre called HEF ....... it's an age old problem we seem to always have "getting rid of goo"usually means digging out and replacing with aggregate.

    On the issue of using it in Paddocks? ... do you think it will cause any issues with horses feet/hooves ? .... if not then BOY can we put this to good use .....
     
  12. Dozerboy

    Dozerboy Senior Member

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    I'm not a soil engineer, but lime makes the world of a difference in mud. Every road and parking lot is limed here because we have a heavy clay soil. I'm going to do my research before putting down pavers at my house and see if liming the soil is a good idea.
     
  13. hvy 1ton

    hvy 1ton Senior Member

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    We've had horses on limestone screenings in and around the barns for longer than i've been alive. Only problems we've ever had with their feet was the ferrier showing up on time.
     
  14. Dozerboy

    Dozerboy Senior Member

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    Limestone isn't even close to the same thing as Quicklime. There are exposure concerns, but I'm not sure if they would be on going after its been mixed in and compacted.
     
  15. CM1995

    CM1995 Administrator

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    Ag lime will dry out a wet clay in order to achieve compaction. I have used it before and it works. Totally different animal than quick lime and soil stabilization though.

    If you can get dry 8910 off the belt, not washed, it will do the same thing (dry up wet clay) but it's more expensive because you are paying for the rock fragments instead of just straight lime dust that you get with ag lime.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2012
  16. noah

    noah Member

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    ohio
    Here in ohio we do a lot of farm work, drying up farms roads,paddocks,and heavy use pads. All we do is put down fabric and install 6 to 8 inches of 304 or 411 limestone mix.304 is #4 down to dust. #411 is # 57 down to dust. Just did a pad 140 ft x 80 ft. We just pushed off about 2 ft of cow manure and water and clay what a mess. Laid down fabric rolled in 500 ton of #304s last week. Tandem truck with lumber on it today turn around on it today and never left a mark. We call a heavy use pad a place where they turn out horses, cattle and ect, to feed on or to turn out on in winter or wet weather. Most horse farms like to use #411 because the smaller rock is easier on the hoof. It works very very well . It is NRCS specs. Have alot of pictures but dont know how to post.