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Liebherr T282 accident

Discussion in 'Other Earthmoving Equipment' started by Zed, Sep 18, 2010.

  1. jwbmining

    jwbmining New Member

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    Rod, you're referring to what happened in an Australian mine. The pictures that started off this thread are from an Indonesian mine. (KPC - its on the dump body)
     
  2. hammerman

    hammerman Well-Known Member

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    he really had good luck!!!!
     
  3. BBoomerBootCamp

    BBoomerBootCamp Member

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    Ok so Rod577 is throwing a rod, while Zeb is taking one, or so it would seem, so who's really in the know??
    All I want in life is my grave stone to say Played well with others, sound good gents?!
     
  4. rare ss

    rare ss Senior Member

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    thats crazy stuff to see the front pushed in soo far, surprised the operator its still around to tell the tail
     
  5. Zed

    Zed Well-Known Member

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    Rod,
    I got the information from being on site, when it happened, in Indonesia. A friend from MTU did the engine download and that is where that information came from.
    Obviously not the same event, and I REALLY don't appreciate being called a liar. Enough said.
     
  6. alco

    alco Senior Member

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    Not to worry Zed, I think most of us can see right through this guy and his post. None of his "facts" add up in the slightest, and add to that the fact that he's only ever made one post.......I'd say it's pretty straight forward as to who knows what he's talking about here, and it's not him. Thanks for the information on the incident by the way.
     
  7. KPC_man

    KPC_man New Member

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    Sleepy operator, typical KPC incident
     
  8. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    Normal thing for this class of truck if it comes to a sudden stop from 20-30mph+.

    If he was doing 51mph (or could that have been 51km/h?) just before he hit how in God's name didn't the bouncing movement of the truck wake not the operator up..?

    I'd be asking what happened to the ARC system and why did that not engage when the truck speed went above programmed limits ..?
     
  9. alco

    alco Senior Member

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    Nige, the Liebherr system won't engage unless it is turned on. Even if it were to engage, they are notorious for not being able to stop the truck on a downhill grade if the energy generated by the truck racing downgrade is left unchecked, as it then will exceed the braking capacity of the truck. At that point, we have had several situations where even an emergency application of the service brakes is ineffective.

    I would think the operator was woken up at some point, but the truck was already past the point of no return, and the operator intervention was ineffective at checking the speed of the truck.

    To me, this really looks like what happens when you get an inverter fault, and all retarding power is lost. The service brakes become the only hope, and as is the case with Liebherr T2892Bs, the brakes just don't cut it if they have been applied more than about twice since their last replacement.
     
  10. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    I've been on quite a few mine sites that have Liebherr T282s but never got the chance to crawl round one or talk to the people that run & maintain them. Also over the past few years I've been sent quite a few photos over the "bush telegraph" of mangled Liebherrs in pretty much every continent in the World.

    Your comment seems to make a good case for what I seem to recall we were discussing on another thread a while back, full-fat oil-cooled mutiple disc brakes a la Cat vs "the rest".
     
  11. coalrulz

    coalrulz Well-Known Member

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    Nige, Komatsu has oil-cooled brakes on the 930's and 960's. just sayin'
     
  12. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    I stand corrected ...... OK then, "A la Cat & Komatsu" versus the rest .......

    Komatsu didn't have oil-cooled multi-plate discs on their large electric-drive models. Until the 930 came out they had (and still have for that matter on anything smaller than the 930) dry discs mounted on the outboard end of the wheel motor and turning at twice armature speed. They burn up in one hell of a hurry if you use them at any speed more than about 10mph.

    I may be biased but I know which of the two I'd rather have to stomp the red pedal on if I got in a bind .......
     
  13. surfer-joe

    surfer-joe Senior Member

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    Well, it's not a total writeoff. You have some good tires and wheels. A good bed, lots of engine and transmission parts if not outright exchanges. Likely a decent rear axle assembly and planetary sets. The two rear suspension cylinders look good, and the hoist cylinders still may be good. Lots of money left in this rig.
     
  14. alco

    alco Senior Member

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    I couldn't agree more, oil cooled are the ONLY way to go!
     
  15. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    Backing up a tad to the issue of the load going over the headboard of the dump body takes me back about 15-ish years to delivering some new Cat 789Bs to a mining customer who up to that point had only used Haulpaks. This was of course the days of DC (not AC) Drives and great big contactors in the control box. If your drive contactors did not drop out so that the retard contactors could pick up and bring the resistor grid into play the operator was screwed.

    The Training guys from the mine were looking at the braking system of the 789 & being only used to the wheel motor disc brakes of their Haulpaks they were sceptical of how good the Cat brakes actually were. So for a demo I loaded up a 789 with about 190 tonnes and hit the Secondary Brake pedal at 50kph on a level road. It was amazing how the truck squatted on all 4 corners and as a result probably about 5 tonnes or so or the load came straight over the headboard and landed on the road in front of the truck. Flushed with success I then went back and did the same thing with the Service Brake. After that demonstration I think they were convinced ......
     
  16. coalrulz

    coalrulz Well-Known Member

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    Nige, according to Komatsu's website the 860E also has front and rear multiple wet disk brakes. Looks to be a 260 to 280 ton truck.
     
  17. alco

    alco Senior Member

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    I can't speak for the 789s, as I've never run one, but a few years ago, I had another truck pull out in front of me in a 797 with about 400 tons on her back doing around 60km/h, and all I can say is.....THOSE DAMN BRAKES WORK REALLY, REALLY GOOD!
     
  18. jwbmining

    jwbmining New Member

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    Liebherr trucks are lighter, use less fuel and oil and are ultimately cheaper to operate than trucks with oil cooled brakes. The problem was the operator falling asleep and not hitting the brake to begin with. Sure he'd destroy the dry disc brakes but he'd stop the truck before smacking into the berm like he did. Alco you're senior enough to be able to operate either with no problem I'm sure.
     
  19. alco

    alco Senior Member

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    JWB, I don't run trucks anymore, I'm senior enough to spend my time loading them. But when I did, I ran all of the different types we have. And as for the brakes stopping the truck, don't bet money on it. If a T282B is travelling downgrade at the kind of speeds they are claiming this one did, the brakes aren't going to do squat.......and I can point you to the grave of one of our operators who was killed two years ago next month to illustrate that point!

    As for the Liebherrs burning less fuel, we have found that to not be the case, they burn about the same amount as a 797 does. That is unless you look at monthly totals, then the downtime they experience plays into things........they don't burn fuel while they're in the shop. They also cost more to run in the long run than a 797 does. Factor in the lower availability and lower productivity that results from that, and your cost per ton goes up significantly.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2011
  20. RayF

    RayF Senior Member

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    Interesting thread.Just seen it.:)I did some work on that site a few times in 97/ 98. At that time they were digging with 12 EX3500's and 8 1800's and 126 Cat trucks under them. Three 996 Liebherrs had recently arrived which where having some teething problems.I was there training up the locals in Line Boring and being paid by Shell and mostly working with the Hitachi people. It was a real nice spot:)