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Liddell-Birmingham

Discussion in 'Trailers' started by doublewide, Dec 30, 2018.

  1. doublewide

    doublewide Well-Known Member

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    Here's my Liddell-Birmingham trailer. I use it to haul my JD 410B and my JD 450E along with other minor stuff. I've always been a little curious/confused about how much this trailer is actually designed to carry. It clearly lists the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating as 26,000 lbs. But, it also lists the Gross Axle Weight Rating as 10,000 lbs with 2 axles. It also lists the frame rating as 20,000 lbs. So, which is it 20,000 or 26,000?

    It also lists the tires/wheels as 16.5" load range E. If you add up the load rating on the tires, they barely make 20,000. Trailer 1.jpg Trailer 2.jpg
     
  2. doublewide

    doublewide Well-Known Member

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    Wheel 3.jpg Wheel 2.jpg Wheel 1.jpg Which leads me to the reason for the thread.

    I decided to replace the wheels and tires with 16" load range G tires. By doing this I will be able to match the 26,000 lb number on the tag. I've always been under the impression that these were hub piloted, 8 on 6.5" wheels. The wheel studs are 5/8" - 18 and the lug nuts are a one piece flange nut. What's interesting is that the wheel flange face on the hub looks like it could accommodate stud piloted wheels...
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2018
  3. doublewide

    doublewide Well-Known Member

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    Wheel 5.jpg And, the wheel on the inside on this side clearly looks like it was stud piloted. Before someone ground or beat the conical sections off, kinda.. Wheel 4.jpg
     
  4. doublewide

    doublewide Well-Known Member

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    The outside wheel on this side has a flat face with no conical protrusions. Wheel 6.jpg Wheel 7.jpg
     
  5. doublewide

    doublewide Well-Known Member

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    The hub measures (to the best of my abilities) 4.78125". Wheel 8.jpg
     
  6. doublewide

    doublewide Well-Known Member

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  7. doublewide

    doublewide Well-Known Member

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    My questions to you all;

    1) What is this trailer rated at?

    2) Is this hub piloted or stud piloted?

    C) Would the 4.88" center hole work in this application?
     
  8. Theweldor

    Theweldor Senior Member

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    I know they will be more money and it depends on how much you use your trailer.
    If you can swing 17.5 tires and wheels I think would be a good investment. Hard to believe how much better the 17.5 hold up compared to the 16s.
     
  9. doublewide

    doublewide Well-Known Member

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    I really don't use it that much. Just around town stuff. And I really don't need tires rated at 48,000 lbs.

    But thanks for the thought.
     
  10. Theweldor

    Theweldor Senior Member

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    Something I didn't think of at the time but you have to have room for them also.
     
  11. doublewide

    doublewide Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, the tires I linked to above are already an inch and a half taller than what I have on there now and I'm wondering how that's gonna work out...
     
  12. Shimmy1

    Shimmy1 Senior Member

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    Those are coined rims. They HAVE to be staggered when you install, or you will have issues with studs. Those look exactly like the 10k axles we had on a early 80's Trail King pintle trailer.
     
  13. RZucker

    RZucker Senior Member

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    The coined rims are exactly like the early Dodge dually rims, they have to go on with the wheel stud cones in the right position or you really mess up the rims and hub. My old dinosaur Dodge motor home has these... in 16.5 no less. Grrrr.
     
    Shimmy1 likes this.
  14. doublewide

    doublewide Well-Known Member

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    Same rims that were on my '73 F 350 dump truck. The conical protrusions alternate, one inie, one outie. They used conical lug nuts. And, the hub had the matching recess. That system is stud piloted.

    I think I got a mix matched collection of left over parts here.
     
  15. Mother Deuce

    Mother Deuce Senior Member

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    Gross trailer weight usually refers to the total loaded trailer weight... weight of cargo plus weight of empty trailer. guessing your trailer at 8000. probably good for 7 or 8 ton (9 ton according to the data if 8000 is correct) depending on the weight laws where you live, tire size, axle spacing & ratings, present hitch rating if changes made or worn and inner bridge measurement and OA wheel base. Used to haul a Dynahoe 190 B with a 4 in 1 that weighed about 18,500. Loader bucket hanging over the back of a ten wheeler on a Hyster 20 ton back when dirt was new.
     
  16. doublewide

    doublewide Well-Known Member

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    Yup, that's the way I see it.

    Thanks
     
  17. behnks1990

    behnks1990 New Member

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    A lot of manufacturers add tongue weight, so that they can increase their GVWR. This can be misleading and is not really the right way to do it. GVWR should always be listed as what the axles can carry. For instance, this trailer should be rated at a 20,000 GVWR. The loading capacity should be the 20,000 GVWR - trailer weight + the tongue weight. Typically on a tag or pintle type trailer, the tongue weight will be around 12%, which would be 2,400 lbs., so total GVWR would increase to 22,400 lbs. With this trailer being rated at a 26,000 GVWR the manufacturer is claiming a 30% transfer of weight to the tow vehicle, which no truck would be capable of handling.

    Also, by rating the trailer at a 26,000 GVWR, the buyer of the trailer would be required to pay 12% FET to the government. Hope this helps answer your initial question about trailer rating.
     
  18. doublewide

    doublewide Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info there behnks1990. Hadn't even considered that they would add the tongue weight.
     
  19. doublewide

    doublewide Well-Known Member

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    Out with the old... 20190625_074852.jpg
     
  20. doublewide

    doublewide Well-Known Member

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    In with the new. 20190625_074911.jpg