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Lets see your "ultimate" service truck!

Discussion in 'Showtime!' started by DirtySouthTruck, Jan 18, 2008.

  1. okiecboy

    okiecboy Member

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    Location:
    Oklahoma
    I'm thinking of some drawer set for driver front and hose crimper some where and I am thinking of boxing the area under the crane for more storage and maybe coming up over the cab for filter storage etc. where do you guys hide your air tanks there's not a lot of room under the bed what's the magic number on gals of air storage, not to much to waist space but enough to do the job.
     
  2. okiecboy

    okiecboy Member

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    Location:
    Oklahoma
    IMAG0105.jpg IMAG0106.jpg IMAG0107.jpg IMAG0114.jpg IMAG0115.jpg

    This is my first Big service tuck I've built some handy 2500 and single wheel 1 tons here's some pic's of those....
     
  3. okiecboy

    okiecboy Member

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    Oklahoma
    DSC01839.jpg DSC01847.jpg DSC01842.jpg DSC01844.jpg DSC01845.jpg

    This was my first 2500 chevy that I put together, I know one thing it was a hole lot easier building these on company money instead of your own pocket....
     
  4. GSD1350

    GSD1350 Member

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    midwest
  5. okiecboy

    okiecboy Member

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    Oklahoma
    Owais 12vdc xd300 air compresser it does a great job and saves alot of space
     
  6. tireman

    tireman Senior Member

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    Apr 19, 2011
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    Location:
    St.Louis,Mo.
    I was fortunate enough to get a few new trucks in my days as a tire service tech. First in May 1992 was a 1992 SuperDuty with an FEC service body. Next in August 1997 was a 98 F-800 with an IMT stick boom/truck tire service body(hybrid). Finally in Nov. 1998 was a 99 Sterling(3126 w/9 speed) with an IMT #10 Tirehand. This was my favorite, but loved them all. Also had a 1992 SuperDuty with an FEC boom that I got used but not broken in yet(my first boom truck starting out doing OTR tires) 399065_281978185210365_1466662152_n.jpg 524020_281745411900309_539250927_n.jpg 538382_281702125237971_1362612865_n.jpg
     
  7. Cjmech

    Cjmech New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2013
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    Location:
    Indiana
    This is my 2005 Int 4300
    This truck was actually built custom for International for shows and such. It's not bad. I certainly wouldn't mind more space though an a larger hyd crane!!
     
  8. 707

    707 Well-Known Member

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    Mar 21, 2011
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    Occupation:
    Heavy Duty Equipment Technician
    Location:
    Vancouver, B.C.
    20130806_210403__1380339094_99.199.57.33.jpg My brand new unfinished service truck
     
  9. 707

    707 Well-Known Member

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    Heavy Duty Equipment Technician
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    Vancouver, B.C.
  10. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair . . . As I have mentioned before it amazes me that private operators can justify large service trucks for routine repairs on general contracting and farming equipment . . . different thing of course if working for a mine.

    For instance the U.K. poster tct tractors does wide and varied work out of the back of a Landrover and, like around here he would probably be priced out of the market if he had to charge the rates required to finance such fancy chariots.

    As I have mentioned, as an equipment owner no way would I be prepared to pay the rates I imagine would be needed, especially if it was just some "o" rings or basic welding . . . or do you charge for your expertise and throw the truck in free?

    Not trying to be a smart arse here, I genuinely don't understand. We all pretty much run the same gear and I am trying to get my head around the different cost dynamics within our industries.

    Cheers.
     
  11. FSERVICE

    FSERVICE Senior Member

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    indiana
    so how is the project coming along?? give us some pics/update PLEASE!!!!:)
     
  12. theironoracle

    theironoracle Senior Member

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    OWNER/OPERATOR MOBILE HEAVY EQUIPMENT REPAIR
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    scrub puller, I get paid from the time I start driving to a customers job until I get back where I started. Lets just say I get paid the same per hour as a 20 ton excavator operated and fueled (that makes it relative to wherever the readers are living)? Why because that's how much it cost for my tools and equipment to do my job. My customers demand the tools that I have, for instance a 300 amp welder is a minimum required for the air arcing and welding I do $5,000, they also require my crane $25,000 it lifts 8000 lbs real close but the biggy is I can remove hydraulic pumps, engines and attachments from there machines, they also require my air compressor $5,000 for fast removal of components, and then there are the hand tools and miscellaneous parts for repairing there equipment add this all together and wah-lah you are now packing 10,000lbs of goodies that the customers require and you need a 12,000lb (priceless) truck to haul it all around. My customers rarely call me to "replace an o-ring" or jump start a dead piece of equipment or change cutting edges or change oil, this stuff is usually performed by there operators. My customers leave me for the more complicated projects that require my special tooling, not to mention my "expertise". In regards to "it is different working in a mine" I can't get my head wrapped around this I think your actually saying somehow working in a mine is more valuable? that is not how it works in the U.S. anyways it is a free market. Another large cost I have is liability insurance my customers and the land owners they work for require me to have a $2 million policy this is $5,000 a year hopefully all these numbers are adding up for you! As far as TCTRACTORS and others like him anywhere in the world even 707 above there I would prefer to drive around a suv or a smaller "specialized" truck instead of a much larger truck! .......that is it for now I am interested in where this discussion is headed it may need to be posted under "shop talk" in its own thread..................TIO
     
  13. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair . . . theironoracle Thanks for your well considered and worded reply.

    I too am interested in continuing the discussion and, as you suggest, I think it warrants a new thread over at "shop talk".

    I'll start one and see if any other folks come on board the different ways we do things is fascinating to me . . . see you over there in the next few days.

    Cheers for now.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2013
  14. Mike L

    Mike L Senior Member

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    Dec 1, 2010
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    Occupation:
    Self employed field mechanic
    Location:
    maine
    f6503.jpg f650.jpg a couple of my chariot
     
  15. skidsteer.ca

    skidsteer.ca Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
    Contractor
    Location:
    Nw Ontario
    Actually to work in the mine does not require a high level of expertise, we have a shop to back us up and a long list of spare equipment. But the guys in the seat don't even grease or fuel let alone change a fuse or filter. Further more they seem to prefer hiring those who could not if they had to. 1/2 the time we go there to explained how the machine should function or to acess the level of the problem then advise on a action plan to remedy generally if we can't fix it in a hour or two thy want us to more to the next machine.
    Also from a liability stand point, only mechanics can decide when a machine is repaired or still in serviceable condition and remove any lockout tags that may have been placed by someone who does not know if the perceived problem is really a fault
    Ken


    On, Canada
     
  16. theironoracle

    theironoracle Senior Member

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    mike l, is that a f650 or 750?, I just bought an international with that service body and crane on it, the chassis has 400k on it and a bad motor so it needs a newer chassis, I always want to go with a kenworth t300 but currently in my area I can't find one that fits my budget and condition requirements and I am a ford fan that is my second choice......TIO
     
  17. Mike L

    Mike L Senior Member

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    Self employed field mechanic
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    maine
    TIO, it is a 2002 f-650 with a 3126 cat and a 6 speed. i always wondered why the crane was on the left side. i'd love to have a kenworth too but since my boss bought it, i cant complain. You got any pics of your service truck?
     
  18. theironoracle

    theironoracle Senior Member

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    PACWEST
    224.jpg july 21 2011 004.jpg
    The top one is a sterling bullet I ordered new in 2008 when I started my business sold it after about 2 years it was overweight with just the tools in the truck and nothing in the bed and was scary to drive very soft in the back end. The bottom truck is the replacement never overweight and and drives just fine, just full to the gills now after 3 years and probably going to get replaced next season. The next service truck will not be white totally sick of the "fleet look"..........TIO
     
  19. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

    Joined:
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    12,275
    Occupation:
    Service Manager
    Location:
    Knoxville TN
    Nice truck TIO. :drinkup

    I see you went with the Maintainer body on the second truck. I use a Maintainer myself. I've been around a number or bodies, have to say Maintainer is the toughest body I've worked with, and quality as well, have nothing bad to say about Maintainer. :drinkup



    Pete 335 1-4-13 006.jpg
     
  20. big ben

    big ben Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
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    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    It funny every time is see a crane on the R/H side I always think "why is it on that side?'. Needless to say mine is one the left side and i love it that way. Personally all my hand tools and main work tools are on the left side so I try to always have my left side to the machine and having the crane right there when I need it just makes sense for me.

    So whats the reasoning for people preferring the right side ?