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Just curious

Scrub Puller

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Mar 29, 2009
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3,481
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Gladstone Queensland Australia
Yair . . .

Maybe not to other Aussies, but to me, heavy trucks set up as a tipper with a single axle look really weird.

What about would be the payload in pounds of a rig such as this . . . .

Heavy%20Equipment%20205.jpg


Thanks to anyone who cares to answer . . . as the thread title says I'm just curious.

Cheers.
 

willie59

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Knoxville TN
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Service Manager
Dang good looking R model Mack! :drinkup

I can't answer the question of payload, here in the USA the rule of thumb is pretty much 20,000 lbs per axle, so figure in the weight of the truck and you get an approximate payload. Small single axle dumps are pretty common here, for example, with general contractors or plumbing contractors, they just need a dump truck heavy enough to drag a float trailer with their loader/backhoe and to have a dump bed to haul off the spoils or bring in a load of gravel, they really don't need a large tandem axle dump truck.
 

Shimmy1

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Aug 14, 2014
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North Dakota
That truck could legally gross 32,000 pounds (or for YOU, Scrub, 14,500 kgs). 12,000 on the steer, and 20,000 on the rear.
 

Birken Vogt

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Nov 30, 2003
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Grass Valley, Ca
Here you can have a full 20,000 on the steer except you have to have < 620 lbs/in front tire width. There is an exception that includes in the exception about every type of truck there is including

-dump
-semi
-tank
-concrete
-grain
-crane
-bus

and it goes on....

Unless I misunderstand the rules.
 

Willie B

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Mount Tabor VT
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Electrician
Dunno It says 43000 gross. I'd bet empty it weighs 20,000. I think that is a little above what single axles typically weigh. I've seen lots of single axle gravel trucks weighing 35000 fully loaded. Typically they carry 7 CU Yards of gravel or 19000. My little C65 Weighs 12500 empty, and either 26000, or 27500 whether you look at the nameplate, or title.

Here you need CDL over 26000 GVW

Willie
 

movindirt

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under a shady tree
Like Willie B said, says 43,000 Gross weight on it, I'd bet it weighs more like 17 or 18 thousand empty, unless those bulldogs are super heavy, I've got tandems with another axle and longer box that are only 19 thousand empty. So you're in the 12 ton capacity range...it would never scale out right and that would probably overflow the box anyway. These "2 ton" size trucks are handy for a lot of things, a lot of landscapers/hardscapers run them with 12 or 14 foot low sided boxes that they can put pallets of stone and materials in and still drag a trailer and loader. To me a truck set up like the one you posted Scrub Puller is pretty much useless IMO. For what I'm going to pay to plate that truck I'd rather run a tandem.
 

Truck Shop

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Dec 7, 2015
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WWW.
That drive axle is also a little to far forward. 10" back from where it is now would be about right. IMO and just my two cents. Besides wider front tires it would
also need a 16,000 lb front axle. Which means you might as well have twin screw.

Truck Shop
 

td25c

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2009
Messages
5,250
Location
indiana
Yair . . .

Maybe not to other Aussies, but to me, heavy trucks set up as a tipper with a single axle look really weird.

What about would be the payload in pounds of a rig such as this . . . .

View attachment 159135


Thanks to anyone who cares to answer . . . as the thread title says I'm just curious.

Cheers.

LOL Scrub !

You could load that truck until stone is overflowing over the wood side boards .

Handy rig in tight spots & spreading stone on hillsides .:yup

We have one of those weird trucks as well .

1966 Chevy C 60 with a wood tipper bed . Short wheelbase allows it to go where " No other truck will go ".


Plus after 50 years of service she's still earning $:D

https://www.heavyequipmentforums.co...-spindle-broke&p=580092&viewfull=1#post580092
 
Last edited:

Scrub Puller

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Messages
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Location
Gladstone Queensland Australia
Yair . . .

Dang good looking R model Mack!

That's what I thought willie59. It's just a picture off the net but it caught my eye as a fine example of what I'm curious about.

I'm talking way out of my field here (again) but I do understand the situation with small contractors as willie59 describes and of course we have the same situation here but as mentioned up thread ( in my parts of Australia) very seldom do you see such a heavy single axle tipper.

I suppose it's what's available at what cost but it seems the short bed with high sides in the US is the preferred option where as I would have thought it an absolute pain for a small contractor loading with small skids and the like.

This style of low sided truck (around here) is almost universal when it comes to a single axle for a small contractor . . . .

cv_tipper_truck-L.jpg

In no way am I trying to be controversial. As I have mentioned before I find it interesting how different equipment is used to do similar jobs in different places.

Cheers.
 

old-iron-habit

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Most likely the fellow had the nice old Mack and thougt better to re-purpose it than let it set to rot. I'm sure weight wise it can't carry much but I bet it makes a dandy trailer toter with lots of gears and big brakes. Here in Minnesota one could license it to 33,000 lbs gross on the truck. Here the load has to be a number of inches (can't remember how many)below the top of box when hauling dirt, sand or gravel. Everyone runs boards to get a load and still be legal.
 

Old Doug

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Mo
If you ever drove a f750 or a c60 with 20,000 on it you can understand why someone would build a truck like this. I can easyly under stand haveing a truck like this but back in the 70s there was alot of guys makeing aliveing hauling with single axle dump trucks one big deal back then was the bridges. Its funny to look at the diffrents in trucking from one country to the next. I would like to know why in some countrys they pull 3 axle trailers with single axle trucks and here a single axle will pull a single axle trailer or 2 pups?
 

Willie B

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Mount Tabor VT
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I have the sense that US now is pretty consistent in trucking laws. In the sixties and seventies there was a lot of diversity in truck law. As example are the COE or forward control, And some of the strange combinations of straight truck with fifth when at the extreme rear, and a little bitty semi trailer. Made for some unique trucks. I get the under 26000 trucks now, but heavy singles seem odd. I know many municipal trucks that are primarily snow plows, secondarily, they haul gravel...sometimes. A single axle is more attractive to purchasing agents, more maneuverable, and hauls enough gravel to be somewhat useful. I presume for hire truckers are paid per yard. I'd think breaking even would be easier with either a tandem, or triaxle.

Willie
 

Dickjr.

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Mar 24, 2011
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Kentucky
I had a L8000 Ford with the 7.8 Ford built diesel and 6 speed trans. I hate to say tranny , it reminds me of Bruce Jenner. Anyway and on point , I could haul 11.5 ton legal here I KY. 10 foot bed and 42" sides. 10 ton was comfortable on the road , 11.5 not bad , but with the tall sides , they loaded me heavy with wet dga and I crossed the scales with 14 ton on. Drink 18 beers and drive down the road , same handling experience. People here want a single axle at times for small loads and I used it mostly for a tractor.
 

390eric

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Feb 24, 2009
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274
Location
pittsburgh PA
I have a few friends that have single axles that have been in the family for years. Here in Pittsburgh PA we have a lot of tunnels and bridges. Most of these old single axles you can see where the cab roll was cutoff at some point for paving either a tunnel or bridge. Need the clearance to get the bed all the way up in these low height areas. A lot of these trucks still in use today. Heavy duty single axles
 
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