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John Deere 570A from the mid-seventies snow plow

Discussion in 'Old Iron!' started by Clyde Hathaway, Jan 17, 2020.

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  1. Clyde Hathaway

    Clyde Hathaway Member

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    Irvington, VA

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    Hank R and DMiller like this.
  2. 56wrench

    56wrench Senior Member

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    not to rain on your parade, but,most snow blades of that type have a spring-loaded trip for the cutting edge or the blade. if you are very gentle and careful you may be ok. on frozen ground go slow. watch out for curbs, etc. overall, nice-looking but use it carefully. on those machines it was common to break a tooth off the circle if you hit something hard enough with the moldboard while doing snow removal. john deere had a welding procedure for that type of repair
     
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  3. Clyde Hathaway

    Clyde Hathaway Member

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    Thanks for your input - and you are so correct. The "trip cylinder" was missing so we welded it up straight with the blade at a 60 degree attack angle. The cutting edge is very worn too - - but after the welding bill - -have to wait until after grading this summer for that, Ha! Plan is to keep the blade off the road an inch this season, mostly mounted it in case of heavy drifting to get through for the belly blade to take care of it. Thanks for the input!
     
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  4. rsherril

    rsherril Well-Known Member

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    "Shoes" on the both sides of the plow can help with maintaining a gap between the road surface and the plow. I suspect that the chains I see might do the same. Is the plow capable of floating up at all?
    With the general decline in snowfall where I'm at I told my HOA that I won't be plowing snow this year and advised that they find an alternative which they have. To date, no significant snow at our elevation, (4500 ft.). Saves me from putting chains on in December, not much fun.
    BTW, very nice looking clean machine. My 570A is showing its age as I don't have a shop I can put in in for some TLC. At forty yrs old, it still works well and parts are readily available.
     
  5. 56wrench

    56wrench Senior Member

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    I agree- skid shoes would help
     
  6. Clyde Hathaway

    Clyde Hathaway Member

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    Thank you guys for the suggestion of shoes. IF we ever get snow I mostly will be on gravel roads. That would preclude shoes but chains will limit depth. It can float on road too by lengthening limit chains. Here in Va they are always soft and thawed. Thanks for complement on grader. It is about 3960 for serial number which I have narrowed to about 1976. You are right on parts, even got 3 knobs for front and rear windows from local dealer.
     
  7. check

    check Senior Member

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    Shoes are advantageous on some types of gravel roads, like round rocks which blades sometimes dig into if they don't have shoes.
     
  8. Jonas302

    Jonas302 Senior Member

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    Always nice to be ready even if you dont get enough snow And a real good looking old grader
     
  9. rsherril

    rsherril Well-Known Member

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    OK, I'll bite. What"s that third knob for? My rear window is fixed. You got the fastback model? Picture please.
     
  10. Clyde Hathaway

    Clyde Hathaway Member

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    Hey Sherrill, I will send a pic next week when I get home. My rear window is made just like the front. Two hinges up top with the two big knobs on bottom pieces just like the front. Serial number is like 3190-T, about mid 1975 best I can tell.
     
  11. Raildudes dad

    Raildudes dad Senior Member

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    Some of the counties around here run rubber tired wheels instead of shoes on their truck mounted front plows.We have v's for our graders. We still run shoes since we don't mount our front plows very often. Some winters we may only put a front plow on a half dozen trucks to push back drifted area. We run under body scrapers with a rear mounted 6 foot wing. We can scrape 13-15 feet at a time and the wing does a great job of flipping the snow over the banks.