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Interesting trailer

Discussion in 'Equipment Moving Questions' started by Nige, Aug 16, 2018.

  1. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    I'd like to know how much this thing cost....... Strange that I travelled through Amsterdam airport the other week and Beelen's Cat machines were everywhere. They caught my eye because it's not usual to see customers painting their earthmoving equipment in corporate colours rather than the equipment manufacturer's standard colours these days.

     
  2. Junkyard

    Junkyard Senior Member

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    Ballpark $$ based on my last inquiry which was 2011-2012 timeframe I had looked at some and they were around $200k for a couple sets of axles plus whatever deck you want which was $70-100k. That was Scheuerle. Goldhofer was usually 10-15% higher.

    They’re badass though.
     
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  3. Graham1

    Graham1 Senior Member

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    That is some trailer.
    Graham
     
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  4. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    What caught my eye was the attention to detail on things like the hydraulic and electrical connections and the way they were locked in place to avoid dodgy connections.

    The tractor’s not half shabby either.
     
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  5. Junkyard

    Junkyard Senior Member

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    They do things very clean and slick compared to US made stuff. Some of the hydraulic fittings were a bit oddball but having spent all these years on Italian drill rigs I’ve seen just about all of them now!
     
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  6. Birken Vogt

    Birken Vogt Charter Member

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    Got any pictures of all that? Seems I spend half my time chasing down bad connections.
     
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  7. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    These are stills from the video. Best I could do.
    upload_2018-8-17_0-19-50.png
    upload_2018-8-17_0-20-50.png
     
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  8. Jeckyl1920

    Jeckyl1920 Well-Known Member

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    I think they should use that lock system on all hydraulic attachments. Nothing is more annoying than having a hot day force you to bleed 1 hose to get the bugger on because you have to push it by hand with oil all over it.

    Like a skidsteer in specific. The block holds all the connections in alignment, including water and electrical. We have an old labor that isn't strong enough to swap out hydraulic lines for the operator on our AC demo crew. I feel that would solve a lot of effort as well as save time.
     
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  9. Wes J

    Wes J Senior Member

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    Reminds me of the float trailers the US Army uses to haul tanks. Made by Oshkosh I believe.

    [​IMG]

    Not sure it would fly here though. In Illinois, even with permits they don't like having double axles. It's all about length and bridge law. Here they just keep adding boggies to the tail of the trailer until they get enough axles and length to satisfy the formula.

    I wish we could run the double axles like they can out West. I've been in California and seen Murray mechanical neck trailers that are all of 30 feet long hauling huge machines.
     
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  10. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    Personally I think that the whole rules of the game regarding big equipment trailers changed when steerable bogies and/or steerable pendle axles became the norm rather than the exception.
     
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  11. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder Staff Member

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    Kind of scary to see all that mass rolling at highway speed!!
     
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  12. willie59

    willie59 Administrator

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    Dang that's a nice rig and setup. Very cool de-tatch lowboy trailer. One thing that amazes me is the use of COE trucks in the EU nations. Here in the USA, COE trucks gave way years ago to conventional trucks because of aerodynamic reasons, better fuel economy. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but here in the USA, the first aero designed truck was the Kenworth T600 "ant eater". I love seeing this around the world stuff and how it differs from our lo-cal. And Steve, I'll not mention names, but I know an outfit in north Georgia that commonly transports 400 class excavators on a 50 ton lowboy doing excess of 80 mph. It's a crazy world we live in.
     
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  13. Birken Vogt

    Birken Vogt Charter Member

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    I don't know all the rules, but something to do with the 16 tire groups on those axles. Do they have 16 tire groups elsewhere? Also 20,000 front axle is allowed.
     
  14. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    The reason for COE against conventionals in Europe is easy Willie - length. Most European countries have tight limits (around 16.5 metres/54ft) for the maximum overall length of an articulated truck which means that if you want to haul a 40ft trailer a conventional won't allow you to stay within the length limit. I'd also hazard a guess that the major European truck manufacturers can get similar aerodynamic numbers for COEs as for conventionals these days.
    Also in some of the tight corners you find in European cities that were probably designed by the Romans, a COE can manoeuvre much easier than a conventional because it doesn't have the extra length hanging out the front.
     
  15. heymccall

    heymccall Senior Member

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  16. AzIron

    AzIron Senior Member

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    That's a lot of moving parts on a trailer I will stick with a Murray simple and stout you just can't beat them
     
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  17. Junkyard

    Junkyard Senior Member

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    The dual lane style loading has become more popular here. They still don’t like the concentrated loads of the other style. I’ve seen some creative means to make weight over the years.

    They do have some awesome capabilities!
     
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  18. 92U 3406

    92U 3406 Senior Member

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    You should see some of the stuff that gets moved around here in Northern Alberta. Not uncommon to see a complete 850 Hitachi rolling down the highway at speed.
     
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  19. Wes J

    Wes J Senior Member

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    We can't run those here without permits. We can run 20K steer axles though.

    Most common setup I see here is a 4 axle tractor and a 4 axles lowboy. With the right permit and the right loading, that could gross 160,000lbs.

    To go bigger than that, they add a jeep in front and hang a bogie off the back. There's no length restrictions on class I truck routes.

    [​IMG]
     
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  20. AzIron

    AzIron Senior Member

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    Az recognizes dang near anything for axel arrangements and the permits are not complicated

    All the guys moving big iron stick to Murray's with a jeep it's really slick not having to drop to load most things it's also nice length wise cause you can't get a Murray in a lot of places you wont get a triple axle

    That said if I was doing heavy work in a place with no room I would have steerable axles on the trailer there is no better way to do it but it's way expensive
     
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