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information on cranes brand AMERICAN and brand Lima ,Northwestand other prestigious disappeared

Discussion in 'Cranes' started by trombeur, Nov 12, 2021.

  1. trombeur

    trombeur Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    italia
    hi sorry if I disturb, on the net in the used market I have seen, numerous crawler cranes, brand AMERICAN,Northwest, LIMA, and others that I do not remember now, are especially crawler ones that are used as drag lines or cable excavators, you could provide me more information on these brands disappeared the most used models and other prestigious brands now disappeared or absorbed by other manufacturers, on the net there is little information on cranes and builders, thanks excuse me if I disturbed you.


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  2. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    That is a very deep subject as mobile lifting devices go way back. My grandfather and father owned mobile cranes for their construction businesses so I have a little more than a passing interest in the subject and always keen for more. Northwest and Koehring were the cranes that they owned with my dad's crane in my avatar when it was new.

    I know power cranes came about as a result of the railroad and steam power. I've heard that early railroad cranes were built by the same companies that build the railroad engines. Lima comes to mind off hand. I'm sure that in some sense logging on the west coast of North America also had some input as the winch sets and steam power was a common engineering solution. Link-Belt, Bucyrus Erie, Manitowoc, P&H, Lima, American, Northwest and Koehring were all common names when I was growing up. Now days you see Grove, Drott, Liebherr, Demag, Terex, Tadano, Kobelco and many more in various configurations. Like any type of manufacturing of large mobile devices, it's all about money and the world economy so many of the manufacturers that I have listed are gone or only a shell hidden inside some giant holding company. The other problem with large line cranes is that they generally last for decades with minimal maintenance. You don't need a new one very often. Technology has also largely done away with friction cranes as hydraulic power for operation has made them safer, easier to operate and less expensive to purchase.

    The link below provides some of the information on the early development of mobile cranes.

    https://www.constructionequipmentguide.com/The-Mobile-Crane-Its-First-50-Years-in-America/16833/
     
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  3. trombeur

    trombeur Senior Member

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    Thanks for your valuable information, I noticed that the lattice boom crawlers themselves were very versatile, they were used in place of hydraulic excavators before their advent, they were and are installed on the decks of dredges and pontoons for maritime port dredging and lifting machines are used as a base for drilling rigs, slow but versatile machinery for old construction sites and old quarries and mines am I wrong? which are the best, most reliable and widespread in your opinion, or all on the same level?

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  4. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    They all have their place at what they are efficient at. Lattice boom, line crane or friction cranes use mechanical means to roll a wire rope onto a drum that can be turned in one direction under power and can turn the other direction simply by the weight on the line. The key to powering the drums is a system of gears and chains that is usually known as the draw works. The big different between most manufacturers is in the type of frictions and manner that they are applied.

    I don't know that I ever heard any operators or mechanics state any kind of preference for one brand over any other. They are all tiring to run and hard to work on. There are few operators left that even have the ability to run a drag line or clam shell efficiently for a long period of time. A bad operator can damage them and possibly hurt anyone that might be around when they are operating. Those giant lift cranes you see on many construction sites now days use hydraulic motors to turn their drums. They are much easier to operate but as far as I know they don't have the ability to free wheel the drum so using them for drag lining or clam shells is not really possible.
     
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  5. trombeur

    trombeur Senior Member

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    thanks for your clarification, in truth in my part there is a serious problem of coastal erosion, every storm disappears a large piece of coast, to buffer this serious problem they are placing boulders with a pontoon equipped with a classic link belt, I must tell you that the The operator is very capable, much more skilled than an excavator operator, it is not easy to place large shaped boulders from the deck of a dredger.

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    soilmar.it/Motopontone%20Enrico%20I.htm
    MOTOPONTONE “ENRICO I” – DATI TECNICI PRINCIPALI

    "RACCOLTA FOTO"

    "HOME"

    ARMATORE/PROPRIETARIO

    SO.I.L.MAR S.r.l.

    COMPARTIMENTO DI ISCRIZIONE

    NA 10922

    ENTE DI CLASSIFICAZIONE

    R.I. NA. n° RI 67566

    LUNGHEZZA

    m 35,35

    LARGHEZZA

    m 12,00

    ALTEZZA DI COSTRUZIONE

    m 2,50

    STAZZA LORDA

    TSL 378

    PORTATA MASSIMA IN COPERTA

    t 350

    IMMERSIONE MEDIA A VUOTO

    m 1,00

    IMMERSIONE MASSIMA

    m 2,00

    VELOCITA’ MASSIMA A ½ CARICO

    nodi 6

    POTENZA INSTALLATA

    n° 2 motori CATERPILLAR mod. 3408C TA di potenza cadauno pari a 480 HP a 1.800 g/min

    GRUPPI ELETTROGENI

    n° 2 – di cui 1 da 34 KW e 1 da 38 KW

    GRU DI BORDO

    LINK BELT LS 518 installata su cingoli – lunghezza braccio m 24,00 portata max R.I. NA. t 68,5 con braccio L = 18,30 m

    CLASSIFICAZIONE

    Navigabilità nazionale costiera (entro 20 miglia dalla costa)

    POSIZIONAMENTO

    Ancore come da armamento R.I. NA. – n° 2 a prua e n° 1 (con verricello) a poppa







    PRINCIPALI COMPONENTI DEL MOTOPONTONE “ENRICO I°”


    · Gru cingolata semovente LINK BELT LS 518, n° fabb. 4EW809 – matr. ISPESL PC 406/88, equipaggiata con braccio di L 24,40 m, funi, catene, bozzelli e benna a polipo da 2,5 mc;



    · Motore di propulsione del tipo a combustione interna, ciclo diesel, costruttore CATERPILLAR, tipo 3408C, matricola 99U12451, n° 8 cilindri a V, alesaggio 137 mm, corsa 152 mm, potenza massima continuativa pari a 339 kW a 1800 giri/min;



    · Motore di propulsione del tipo a combustione interna, ciclo diesel, costruttore CATERPILLAR, tipo 3408C, matricola 99U12452, n° 8 cilindri a V, alesaggio 137 mm, corsa 152 mm, potenza massima continuativa pari a 339 kW a 1800 giri/min;

    http://www.soilmar.it/foto/index.htm

    · Gruppo elettrogeno ciclo diesel, costruttore CATERPILLAR, tipo 3054 matricola CHN00469, n° 4 cilindri in linea, alesaggio 100 mm, corsa 127 mm, potenza massima continuativa pari a 34 kW a 1500 giri/min;



    · Gruppo elettrogeno ciclo diesel, costruttore CATERPILLAR, tipo C.4.4 matricola D1K00258, n° 4 cilindri in linea, alesaggio 100 mm, corsa 127 mm, potenza massima continuativa pari a 38 kW a 1500 giri/min;
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    · Gruppo elettrogeno di emergenza ciclo diesel, costruttore CATERPILLAR, tipo C.4.4, n° 4 cilindri in linea, alesaggio 100 mm, corsa 127 mm, potenza massima continuativa pari a 9 kW a 1500 giri/min;


    · Zattera di salvataggio auto gonfiante della EUROVINIL SpA, tipo SOLAS, capacità 6 persone, matr. 79071132;



    · Zattera di salvataggio auto gonfiante della EUROVINIL SpA, tipo SOLAS, capacità 6 persone, matr. 79071135;



    · Zattera di salvataggio auto gonfiante della EUROVINIL SpA, tipo SOLAS, capacità 6 persone, matr. 79072014;



    · Battello di emergenza della NAVIGATION’S, tipo DSB-420 IRB n° serie 1-38674, capacità 6 persone;


    · Motore per battello di emergenza, costruzione YAMAHA, tipo MED D 14, matr. 0575/03;


    · Gru per ammaino/recupero battello di emergenza, costruzione NAVIGATION’S, portata max 6 ton., tipo MED, matricola 355005 CS/01;


    · Verricello di poppa ad una campana di tonneggio verticale da 350 mm, costruzione VERRICELLI NAPOLETANI SOCIETA’ COOPERATIVA (NA), omologazione RINA 2007/NA/542/01-01;


    · Verricello di poppa ad una campana di tonneggio verti


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  6. Tugger2

    Tugger2 Senior Member

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    Messages:
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    British Columbia
    I agree they are tiring to run and sometimes a challenge to work on , I speak from experience of still running some older conventional cranes on jobs today.
    As to brands of preference, maybe Bucyrus Erie might be top of the list. They seem to be the most widely distributed world wide with many still on the job today . I still run these three ,American , Lima and Bucyrus Erie on jobs P9061979.JPG P6112595.JPG PC211449.JPG
     
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  7. Tugger2

    Tugger2 Senior Member

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    Messages:
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    Location:
    British Columbia
    Your marine construction industry looks interesting. A lot of smaller conventional rigs working. Keep up the great pictures.
     
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  8. skyking1

    skyking1 Senior Member

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    Nov 3, 2020
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    Location:
    washington
    @trombeur , there is one of those little military green truck cranes just down the road from me, small world.

    PXL_20210728_224509787.jpg LOL I saw Lima in the title and knew you would hook a tugger :D
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2021
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  9. Tones

    Tones Senior Member

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    Ex land clearing contractor, part-time retired
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    Ubique
    The army unit I was with had a Garwood rubber tired dragline. It was powered by a 6cly Willie's engine through a torque converter to a 3 speed transmission for travelling. It also had a towing frame, air brake connections and light connections so it could be flat towed. It was also built to be air portable in a C130. I've never seen one since and in the right hands could be a good little jigger. Spud_Monkey would have loved to have owned it.
     
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  10. Tugger2

    Tugger2 Senior Member

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    Good catch Skyking, you hooked a 75 ton Lima. Those rubber tired American military units seemed like they were half P&H, they have the same juice frictions.
    I guess we are getting a bit off topic but when Tones mentions a Garwood it would be cool to see more of that stuff to . Another rare one is the Hansen.
     
  11. trombeur

    trombeur Senior Member

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    https://tractors-fandom-com.transla...l=en&_x_tr_tl=it&_x_tr_hl=it&_x_tr_pto=nui,sc
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    Garwood ???
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    Garwood rubber tired dragline???


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    thanks for the clarification, I repeat Garwood, never seen or heard, the front blade maybe to stabilize the machine like legs hydraulic feet, special equipment military genius, I don't think bulldozer blade suitable for tracing roads tracks, the machine is too heavy and clumsy, I'm wrong ?
    [​IMG]AMERICAN HOIST MODEL M2385 ROUGH-TERRAIN CRANE (1969) ON STOLPER INDUSTRIES 4×4 CARRIER. IT’S INCLUDED WITH DOZERS AS IT HAS A BLADE AND COULD BULLDOZER A PAD TO WORK FROM OR LEVEL MATERIAL IT HAS EXCAVATED

    [​IMG]AMERICAN HOIST MODEL M2385 ROUGH-TERRAIN CRANE (1969) ON STOLPER INDUSTRIES 4×4 CARRIER. IT’S INCLUDED WITH DOZERS AS IT HAS A BLADE AND COULD BULLDOZER A PAD TO WORK FROM OR LEVEL MATERIAL IT HAS EXCAVATED

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    AMERICAN HOIST MODEL M2380 ROUGH-TERRAIN CRANE ON STOLPER INDUSTRIES 4×4 CARRIER. IT’S INCLUDED WITH DOZERS AS IT HAS A BLADE AND COULD BULLDOZER A PAD TO WORK FROM OR LEVEL MATERIAL IT HAS EXCAVATED

    https://classicdozers.wordpress.com/military-dozers/
     
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  12. Tones

    Tones Senior Member

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  13. trombeur

    trombeur Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2014
    Messages:
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    Marion 5480 23 cu. Iarda. pala
    Bucyus-Erie 15W - 13 m. lagna
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    Bucyus-Erie 1150 25 m.
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    Bucyus-Erie 1250 Dragline
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    Linton Mill
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    bulldozer??


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  14. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

    Joined:
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    For some reason the photos in your last post did not come through.

    On the subject of the military adaptations that were paid for and built by some general's or politicians idea of what would be good to have. The photos show lots of possibilities but none in any state other than being parked somewhere. Lots of militaries dream up machines to accomplish multiple tasks and they are never to actually perform as dreamed up. I've generally known these types of concepts as "design on a cocktail napkin." An engineer comes up with a concept who sells it to someone in military procurement who knows a manufacturing plant somewhere who can build it who knows a senator or congressman that want it done in their district to put people to work. The concept gets through congress and is hidden in an appropriation bill somewhere and it gets signed because no one really reads those things. The army or marines gets a bunch of these monstrosities and finds out they don't perform, so now they sit in some storage place for ten or more years and then get surplussed and sold at auction. They are a perfect example of how tax money gets wasted. The only benefit of the project is a manufacturing plant puts a few people to work, the plant owner rakes off the lions share of the money and a politician gets to stand in front of people and tell them all about how he did this good thing for them.
     
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  15. skyking1

    skyking1 Senior Member

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    That little truck is a little short for setting my barn trusses. I need about 70' of stick to keep from moving everything 4 times. I'd make the guy an offer on if it it had that much.
     
  16. trombeur

    trombeur Senior Member

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    in fact if I have to be honest I often look at military vehicles or firefighters or municipal, municipal, you can find strange machinery with strange fittings, winches, and other accessories that may have been purchased and then parked for years in sheds and sheds, practically new that cost a fortune and then sell them to pulp for 4 money, whoever buys these machines on sale makes good arrari I think, maybe they take almost new machinery with almost zero wear and that maybe after many years are out of standard or are not approved or overhauled , but they are practically intact, for a country farm I think they could be useful as service machinery, to be left parked in a corner of the courtyard and used in case of need or emergency without spending money on external rentals.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_engineering_vehicle
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    Coleman G-55A con modello E Quick-Way (G-684)