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In the market for a skid steer trailer

Discussion in 'Trailers' started by lawngodfather, Feb 1, 2004.

  1. lawngodfather

    lawngodfather Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2004
    Messages:
    9
    Occupation:
    landscaper
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    What should I look for in a trailer?

    Brakes

    Ramps

    D rings

    Etc...
     
  2. mert0714

    mert0714 Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2003
    Messages:
    64
    Location:
    Eastern IA
    What size machine? How many accessories/attachments do you have and will they ride along? I am looking also and have a lot of info I can pass on. This would help point my info in a direction.

    Thanks
     
  3. DKinWA

    DKinWA Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    Messages:
    210
    Occupation:
    Biologist and Contractor
    Location:
    Western Washington
    Regardless of the tow vehicle, brakes (air or electric) absolutely on both axles. If you intend to haul additional implements, go with the ramp trailer. This makes it a lot easier to load and unload the machine and implements. D-rings every 4-5 feet with one at each extreme end. I also like at least half a dozen smaller hooks that I can use to tie down a tarp or small things. Four rear lights are nice if a bulb burns out and you don't have time to change it. A locking tool box is really nice if you want to keep your chains, binders, tarps, etc. One additional thing that always seems to get overlooked, is someplace to store a shop broom. I'm always having to shovel or sweep off my trailer so the rocks and junk don't blow off on the road and break someones windshield.

    Last but not least, enough capacity to haul everything you intend to haul with a little extra for a safety margin. Oops, almost forgot. Make sure the trailer is long enough so your load can be adjusted to get the proper tongue weight. If the trailer is too short, it makes it difficult to position the load in the best location.

    Btw, I love spending other peoples money:D
     
  4. paulsoccodato

    paulsoccodato Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Messages:
    53
    Occupation:
    contractor
    Location:
    yonkers, new york
    i have a custom mfg, 5 ton, 16' trailer for my skid steer.

    like the others have said, get a heavy enough trailer, to cover the machine, and any attachments as well.
    my trailer has a wood deck, and ramps.

    the only problem i have is sometimes its tough getting the machine up the ramps.
    i run tracks on my skid, and sometimes i slide down the ramps, when wet, or snowy.

    get a trailer that has a locking toolbox, heavy duty ramps, and plenty of d-rings.

    remember, you get what you pay for!
     
  5. badranman

    badranman Charter Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2003
    Messages:
    218
    Occupation:
    Owner Cutting Edge Construction Limited
    Location:
    Halifax Nova Scotia
    DKinWA

    Good idea with the broom, I overlooked it myself.
     
  6. DKinWA

    DKinWA Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    Messages:
    210
    Occupation:
    Biologist and Contractor
    Location:
    Western Washington
    The broom is really handy and sure beats kicking the rocks off with my feet. This summer I'm going to weld a piece of 2 or 2 1/2" pipe to the underside of the deck. This way I can just slide the handle in and hook a bungy on the brush to keep it there. I can't say it was my idea since I saw someone else with the same setup on their lowboy.

    I also keep a shovel on my dump truck and use it to clean the tracks and undercarriage on tracked vehicles before loading. No use giving someone needing a new windshield an excuse to have me purchase it for them:mad:
     
  7. badranman

    badranman Charter Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2003
    Messages:
    218
    Occupation:
    Owner Cutting Edge Construction Limited
    Location:
    Halifax Nova Scotia
    Lawngodfather
    My trailer doesn't tilt (which is an awesome feature) but it does have rear stabilizers that drop down and lock in place. This keeps the trailer from squating when loading/unloading and doesn't fling the ramps either. Pretty much agree with what's been said here.
     
  8. lawngodfather

    lawngodfather Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2004
    Messages:
    9
    Occupation:
    landscaper
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    This is what will be pulling it most of the time.

    Trailer brakes is a must for me, and both axles would be a great idea.
     

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  9. lawngodfather

    lawngodfather Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2004
    Messages:
    9
    Occupation:
    landscaper
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    This is what it will be pulling.

    NH Lx665 turbo, I think the weight it 5800 plus any extra attachments.

    Most of the time it will be smooth, and toothe bucket, and a set of pallet forks.

    I can put any axtra on the truck it's self.

    I was also thinking about have the pallet forks fit to the side of the trailer through some "C" channel welded on, tie a trap over it to hold them in. I can put the smaller bucket in the bigger one.

    Now the broom idea...well I never thought of that one either.

    LED lights......
     

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  10. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2003
    Messages:
    5,786
    Location:
    LaGrangeville, N.Y.
    Make sure you spec Dexter axles. I found out the hard way there are cheaper axles being used on trailers. While up front costs may be a few bucks more, long term costs will be lower. Dexter's brakes and other replacement parts are easy to come by and inexpensive compared to others. Your down time will be reduced when repairs are needed as well.

    I'd also spec the trailer as heavy as possible. I'll bet it won't be long before you upgrade that machine to a bigger unit, or pick up another piece of equipment that's heavier.
     
  11. mert0714

    mert0714 Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2003
    Messages:
    64
    Location:
    Eastern IA
    Not to confuse anymore but we looked at the option of driving on the trailer without any attachment on the machine at all so that directed us to a drop deck trailer with a beavertail. Would you be carrying any pallets or pallet like materials now or in the future? Perhaps a deck-over/beavertail would be better suited. We also looked into a tow charger. This unit trickle charges the break away battery when it is plugged into a pull unit, keeping that battery charged in case of a break-away. No brainer for $30.

    If you are looking at new, some of these options mentioned are not all that expensive and may be cheaper from the factory than your time spent. LED lights are cool and may be a thing of the future. One consideration is the availabity of replacements. I have not looked into that yet.

    The only other length consideration not mentioned is how much room you have to park at your job sites. We are looking at incresed size and may add 7 feet to our length. When added to the tow unit, in some cases, the distance between drives will not allow for both to be connected in tight residential areas.

    Couple other things to look at are closed wheel wells (drop decks). Less road dirt/grime on the deck of the trailer and equipment. Tire ratings-some tires barely meet weights and some over design the tires from model to model. 6 bolt rims vs. 8 bolt rims-all in the trailer engineering and weight ratings. Jacks- definitely upgrade the jack to a 12k or more if needed. This will last longer, take more abuse and when wheels chocked, can allow you to load the trailer without the tow unit attached. Fully enclosed wiring in harnesses will help with maintence issues. Spring assist ramps are nice on the back. Extra tie downs for sure for who know what in the future.

    We are looking at Towmaster/BigTow for our choice. We had a Trail King, but they don't make a drop deck size between 12K and 18K (something a local dealer is going to discuss with the factory rep). Towmaster/Big Tow are built very similar. These have the Torflex axels which have been very good for us (not a problem in over 5 years). The trailer rides just as smooth loaded or unloaded.

    The "get what you pay for" is all in play here. A few might cost a little more now but if maintained well, they will more than pay for themselves and make up the difference in a short time. Just try to plan ahead. Who knew a trailer could be so complicated?:)
     
  12. lawngodfather

    lawngodfather Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2004
    Messages:
    9
    Occupation:
    landscaper
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    Most is along the same lines I have been thinking.

    I was looking in the $3500+ range for some deck overs I have seen, I might as well go to the $5200 24gvw range 24' deckover dove tail econoline. That only that's bad about that, is I don't have much under CDL left if I were to haul supplies.

    A trailer that heavy duty has got to weigh a good amount.

    So what's thought about those? Or any other brand similar size?

    Anyone know an aprox weight of one?

    A trailer is a great investment if you buy the right one the first time. It will last you forever.
     
  13. DKinWA

    DKinWA Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    Messages:
    210
    Occupation:
    Biologist and Contractor
    Location:
    Western Washington
    I've got a 10 ton Olympic beavertail (made here locally in Olympia) that weighs about 4,500# give or take a little. Equipment prices are down around here and I'm seeing some 2-5 year old 20 ton tilt decks going for as little as $7,000. I'd venture to say you should be able to find a good 12 ton trailer in the price range you're looking at. I'm partial to trailking, olympic and trailmax, but that's only because it's practically all the logging and construction companies around here buy. Trailking is probably the leader, but they do have a reputation for a quality product. I don't know anything about econoline, but sure see a lot of them for sale. If you decide to look at used, make sure you look it over really good. More than one trailer has been sold with a cracked frame rail to some unsuspecting buyer. Here's some links for some new and used equipment and trailers.

    My little salesman

    Machinery Trader

    Equipment Trader Online

    As far as I'm concerned, these are some of the best websites out there for online equipment information and pricing.
     
  14. mikegamb

    mikegamb Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2003
    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    Connecticut
    eager beaver has a 20 ton around the 7 or 8 grand range.big tex has some nice units also.i have an older model of the 12EQ style for my loader. it came with the loader
     

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