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Husquvarna still or Ecco

Discussion in 'Forestry Operations' started by Tbrown3998, Oct 1, 2015.

  1. treemuncher

    treemuncher Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2006
    Messages:
    438
    Occupation:
    eatin' trees, poopin' chips
    Location:
    West TN
    Back in the early 90's, when I was taking the Master Logger Course, I asked the instructor and several of the other students the same question regarding saws. To quote the instructor, "They are both great saws but, if you want something easy to get parts for, get a Stihl. If you want something needing less service and maybe more dependable, get a Husky." It was an opinion. I had never run either saw before that.

    I was handed a new Husky 272XP the day we were out in the field practicing the "open face" cut approach. DAMN, I never had anything in my hands that would cut so fast! All I currently had at home was my father's old Shindawa and Poulan. They were slow, had no chain brakes and less than dependable. I NEEDED a real saw for my new business so, on the way home from class, I stopped at Bailey's when they had a store in Jackson and purchased a new 272XP starter kit that included everything I needed except the experience. Bailey's was also the store that furnished the saw for the class to use. Thankfully, saw chaps came with that kit and saved my leg a few years later.

    I would still be using that same saw today had it not been stolen from a jobsite. What did I replace it with? A 385 XP. I keep a 20", 28" and 52" bar for the saw. It is the only saw that I own. It is all that I need. I don't cut on a daily basis but when I do, my cuts are fast and efficient. I prefer to spend my time in an air conditioned cab rather than running a saw. But, when I need the saw, this one never fails me.

    Since my first 272, I've had a few hours running other people's Stihls. Nice saws, good performance but at the end of the day, I will chose my Husky every time.
     
    GregsHD and aighead like this.
  2. aighead

    aighead Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2019
    Messages:
    1,567
    Location:
    Dayton, OH
    52" Bar is insane!
     
  3. treemuncher

    treemuncher Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2006
    Messages:
    438
    Occupation:
    eatin' trees, poopin' chips
    Location:
    West TN
    That 52" bar made cutting this red oak much easier. It measured 64" wide at the cut. Yes, I've cut a few larger than this but this was the largest tree that I ever mulched to date.

    big oak.JPG big oak 2.JPG big oak 3.JPG
     
    colson04, westerner, Tinkerer and 4 others like this.
  4. aighead

    aighead Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2019
    Messages:
    1,567
    Location:
    Dayton, OH
    Yeah, I guess that would do it! That's a giant tree!

    Did you mulch that entire tree or did any of it make it to the mill? Your answer may make me cry a little...
     
  5. charles walton

    charles walton Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2012
    Messages:
    403
    Location:
    Etowah Tennessee
    what are the tires on that trailer? That's a heck of a load on a tag.
     
  6. davo727

    davo727 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    162
    Occupation:
    Aircraft mechanic
    Location:
    N of Houston Texas
    I have a Stihl MS290 and Ms310. Both bought used and they run great but both currently have inop bar oiling. More stuff to fix, project numbers 155, 156 lol. Maybe Ill go buy a new husky and sell the others.
     
  7. cuttin edge

    cuttin edge Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2014
    Messages:
    2,022
    Occupation:
    Finish grader operator
    Location:
    NB Canada
    Never used an Ecco. Had good luck with Stihl and Husky, however. For a cutoff saw, cutting asphalt or concrete, the Husky will outlast the Stihl. Our company has no small engine maintainence program, and a lot of those saws see no TLC. I cringe when I see guys beating the air filter to death and putting it back in. They run hard. wide open for a full tank of gas, fill up and go again. Some saws only last a season, but the Huskys seem more up to the task.
     
  8. westerner

    westerner Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2020
    Messages:
    80
    Location:
    Northern Arizona
    Absolutely the best saw to own- the one you gave to your son-in-law. The one he knows he still ain't paid for.....
     
    Old Doug, KSSS and aighead like this.
  9. Old Doug

    Old Doug Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2013
    Messages:
    2,808
    Location:
    Mo
    I wanted to buy a quick saw and i had a Horse tiller i fixed up to trade in. They to places here sell Husqvarna or Dolmar. The Dolmar dealer has several guys working in the shop and the other place was wanting to down size so i thought if i had a problem Dolmar would be the way to go. The saws coil went bad i took it in and it sat there 6 weeks or longer i finally went and got it ordered a coil from them and fixed it my self. I was mad a stihl dealer opened up here i thought about selling the Dolmar and buying a Stihl but who knows how they would treat me.
     
  10. colson04

    colson04 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    1,402
    Location:
    Delton, Michigan
    I don't rely on the dealer for anything, anymore. I used to think it mattered, but paying attention to how the people around me have been treated by a wide variety of dealers has taught me that learning to fix my own stuff would get me the best service.

    As for saws, I own Stihl, Echo, Holzfarma (chinese), old Homelite and Husqvarna. They all cut wood, they all have their benefits. The Stihl (MS362) I bought new in 2012 has been an absolute runner of a saw for its class and extremely dependable. The Echo (CS-355T), I've had for 2 years and has had an issue with kill switch and recoil. I repaired both issues fairly quickly, but ended up with downtime on a job. The Homelites (410 and 540) are getting hard to get repair parts for as they're orphans and haven't been made for 25+ years. The Chinese saw is a 92cc powerhouse, but very new yet. I already have an issue with oil pump and chain tensioner. The Husqvarna 350 is a runner, but the fuel line keeps cracking inside the tank. I replace with genuine Husqvarna part, and a couple years later, it happens again. When it runs, the Husky is a screamer for a 50cc homeowner saw.

    I run a variety of bars from 14" up to 32", depending on task at hand. Chain varies with project as well, though the bigger saws mostly run skip tooth, full chisel.
     
  11. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    Messages:
    2,112
    Location:
    iowa
    Bought a feller buncher back in 2018 and pretty much retired all the chainsaws for now, as they say, sitting in the seat pulling levers and using hydraulics is definitely the way to get things done, should have done that 30 years ago and the upside to that is, everyone wants to run it, add a firewood processor into the mix and now we can cut and process 50 plus cords of firewood a year in a few weekends and nobody has to pickup a chainsaw, next on the list of must have's is a top loading furnace so we can fill it with a skid steer and then handling and heating with wood might not be so bad for a few more years.
     
  12. ianjoub

    ianjoub Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2018
    Messages:
    848
    Location:
    Homosassa, FL USA
    There is no guarantee we will be ALLOWED to heat with wood in a few years. They don't need wood fire heat in DC after all.
     
  13. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
    Messages:
    11,046
    Occupation:
    Machinery & Equipment Appraiser
    Location:
    Northwest
    Wood is a renewable resource.
     
  14. ianjoub

    ianjoub Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2018
    Messages:
    848
    Location:
    Homosassa, FL USA
    But we are all going to die when the seas rise from the global warming caused by the smoke!
     
  15. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
    Messages:
    11,046
    Occupation:
    Machinery & Equipment Appraiser
    Location:
    Northwest
    Diesel and gasoline smoke.