1. Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!
  2. ALL NEW MEMBERS READ THIS FIRST!! Thank you for joining Heavy Equipment Forums! If you are new to forums we communicate with "Threads", please search our threads to see if your topic may have already been answered and if not then click "Post New Thread" in the appropriate forum. This will allow all of our members to see your question and give you the best chance to be answered. After you've made a number of posts you will graduate to Full Member status where you'll see a few more privileges. Following these guidelines will help make this the best resource for heavy equipment on the net. Thanks for joining us and I hope you enjoy your stay!!

How to save your dozer in a forest fire

Discussion in 'Forestry Operations' started by Little_Grizzly, Sep 6, 2020.

  1. Little_Grizzly

    Little_Grizzly Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2016
    Messages:
    31
    Location:
    California
    We only had a few minutes to do something. So I found a flat spot and cleared it as fast as possible. I wish I had time to cover the exposed hydraulic lines but it turned out fine anyway. This is as close as it gets!

    IMG_7841.jpg

    P.S. My hat is off to Cal Fire. Those guys did a great job saving our old homestead. I'll be cleaning fire retardant off of everything for the next ten years but at least it's still standing. Not shown in the image but those guys trimmed bushes and cut fire brakes with hoes. Even moved my log splitter out in the open away from flammables.

    IMG_7750.jpg
     
    Spud_Monkey, JPV, Truck Shop and 11 others like this.
  2. Birken Vogt

    Birken Vogt Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    Messages:
    3,113
    Location:
    Grass Valley, Ca
    Looks like a good low intensity but clean burn. Nerve wracking for sure because you can never tell what it is going to do until it's already happened.

    Now take advantage of the land clearing and don't let the brush come back on your patch.

    Where about is this? Looks close to here.
     
    Spud_Monkey likes this.
  3. Little_Grizzly

    Little_Grizzly Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2016
    Messages:
    31
    Location:
    California
    This is part of the CSU Lightning Complex Fire. In particular this pic is taken on the northern boarder of Henry Coe State Park.

    Interesting comment from Cal Fire - they said the likely reason the crew tried to save our shack is because we already created a defensible space. If they see a place with eight inches of pine needles and leaves with brush all around they don’t even bother trying.

    The fire behaved much different than the last one in 2007. This one burned in patches. Like you said, low and slow. The previous fire (with about the same fuel load) was hot and fast. It left a lunar landscape behind. Fire is unpredictable.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2020
    Spud_Monkey likes this.
  4. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2007
    Messages:
    9,472
    Occupation:
    Running what I brung and taking what I win
    Location:
    Alabama
    I can't imagine going through that. :eek: Where I live is basically a temperate rain forest with an average rainfall of 60" in a year.
     
    Hallback likes this.
  5. Little_Grizzly

    Little_Grizzly Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2016
    Messages:
    31
    Location:
    California
    Average rainfall in this part of California is 15"/year. This year we only got 7". Add to that 14,000 lightning strikes in one night and you got yourself a problem. This is just a cabin we are talking about so who cares. There were so many people that lost their homes and everything in them.
     
  6. Birken Vogt

    Birken Vogt Charter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    Messages:
    3,113
    Location:
    Grass Valley, Ca
    Where we live looks very similar to this and burns just like this but we get 60" of rain per year also. It just all comes December-March for the most part, and in the months of July-September it seldom rains a drop.

    The brush and grass are manageable if you have a small enough lot but lots of them are so big you have to hire out land clearing and the rules and regulations encourage them to be big and unmanageable. So what used to get grazed by cows and such now just grows thick brush and houses, and burns from time to time.
     
    Truck Shop likes this.
  7. Reuben Frazier

    Reuben Frazier Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2019
    Messages:
    85
    Location:
    NE Texas
    That’s extremely expressive, hats off to you and the firefighters!!
     
    Spud_Monkey and Bumpsteer like this.
  8. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    8,553
    Occupation:
    Retired Mechanic in Stone Quarry
    Location:
    Central New York, USA
    Well not sure about the spec's for here, not sure if they count the inches of snow if melted as part of the inches of rain.

    But looks like they are claiming 41 inch rain and 104 inches of snow. Anyhow we are a little dryer than CM1995 but no where as dry as Little-Grizzly! Tried to find the longest dry spell here and the best I could come up with is back in 2017 when we went 20 days with only a total of 0.10 inches
     
  9. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2015
    Messages:
    4,636
    Occupation:
    fry cook
    Location:
    SE Washington St
    We haven't had rain since April, but that's kind of normal around here.
     
    Spud_Monkey likes this.