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How to keep delayed ooze from causing a mess.

Discussion in 'Lubrication' started by emmett518, Oct 15, 2021.

  1. emmett518

    emmett518 Senior Member

    Joined:
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    I've been told to pump grease until it oozes out of the space between the pin and the bushing.

    Two questions.

    In some bushings the grease does not ooze out equally from all areas around the pins. It comes out one side. Ideally, I should probably remove the pins and clean them out to insure that grease gets everywhere, but that would be a huge undertaking.

    Is this OK?

    2. I'm finding that despite me greasing religiously, I'm pumping 10 - 30 pumps, and not seeing grease oozing. But when I come out the next day, there's a huge glob of grease on the machine or on the ground.

    Is there a technique for greasing that avoids the delayed notification that you have pumped too much, or is it just the way it is?

    Thanks
     
  2. skyking1

    skyking1 Senior Member

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    Just the way it is. I follow up after greasing with some motion, then a wipe if it bothers me. If you cycle the cylinders and then wipe, you get most of it right then.
     
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  3. emmett518

    emmett518 Senior Member

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    What do you wipe with? Zillions of paper towels or rags, or will one rag do the trick? I'm using up an entire roll of paper towels after every grease job.
     
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  4. Jonas302

    Jonas302 Senior Member

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    You using to much grease
     
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  5. emmett518

    emmett518 Senior Member

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    I was told to pump grease until you see it oozing out of the joint. Then stop.
     
    DMiller likes this.
  6. Birken Vogt

    Birken Vogt Charter Member

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    My philosophy has always been to just pump enough that you know some fresh made it to the joint. It will get smeared around by the motion. So long as it actually gets done once in a while.
     
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  7. skyking1

    skyking1 Senior Member

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    The company buys me bags of rags. I'll use a couple after every greasing. they work ever so much better than paper towels.
     
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  8. JLarson

    JLarson Senior Member

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    Rags.
    I grease pins till I just see fresh grease or if there's spacers see them move a little. Once you get used to moving around and greasing stuff you get the hang of it and avoid the grease blobs.
     
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  9. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    By the time the pins and bushings as well the gap between pin eye and tool ears gets wide enough to slop grease the entire mechanism is due for refit and shims. Grease should only be a narrow band film between pin and bushing with a slight left over to sneak out to the side plates. Last 963B I have been using has a 1/8-1/4" slop in pins/bushings and gets a Loud Slap as the Cylinders square up inside the ears with additional 1/4" side travel, can visually see the pin in the gaps where that equates to Inches of flop roll in bucket curl and down roll as enter a materials pile as well when trying to load a truck considerable material being tossed from the bucket on any bump as all of the lift/curl slops up and down.

    Sadly they are only new and tight when younger, that goes for a great many aspects.
     
    petepilot likes this.