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How Much Work Can I Expect?

Discussion in 'Forestry Operations' started by Hummed46, Aug 20, 2018.

?

How busy are you?

  1. 1-2 jobs every 2 weeks

  2. 1-2 jobs per week

  3. Working 4 days per week

  4. Working 5 days per week

  5. Lined up with a waiting list

Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. Hummed46

    Hummed46 Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2018
    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Hi guys, first post here. Long story short, been operating a few machines for a few years and I'm ready to get in a little deeper. I live in central/southeastern PA and I don't know much about the local market so I'm hoping someone will chime in. I don't want to start calling around trying to get rates or anything underhanded like that so I'm turning to the internet.

    I have a close estimate of costs, financing, labor, all that that I'm happy to share with you guys when I get it finished.

    The big thing my estimates depend on is just how much work is out there in southeast PA for a one or two man operation with a T770 and mulching head?

    I know that's a really vague question...I would be going after small jobs to start...2-3 acre pasture reclaimation, single unimproved lots to be built, trail building...

    But the key question is how much work do you guys get? Is it hard to land one or two jobs every couple weeks? Or are you guys seeing 5 days/week every week? One/two guys, truck, trailer, and CTL.

    Thanks in advance,
    Matt
     
  2. Hummed46

    Hummed46 Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2018
    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Just a followup to my post, I know I'm going to get the standard answer...It depends. Depends on your area, how hard you hustle, who you know, other competition, etc. I'm just looking for an average so that I can ballpark my growth assumptions and figure out a few different plans forward. Any info is helpful. Thanks in advance...
     
  3. ianjoub

    ianjoub Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2018
    Messages:
    312
    Location:
    Homosassa, FL USA
    I am not in the business. I am not in the area. I am a businessman.

    I would not try to start a business with such a narrow scope, especially in forestry mulching. Look into how you can get other attachments and offer a variety of services. Have a cash backup. Clientele is built over time. Clientele is likely mostly a word of mouth generated thing. Do good work at a fair price, be able to survive for a few years, and you should be golden.

    Get a snow plow or snow blower attachment, it will likely be a better revenue generator than a mulcher.
     
  4. Hummed46

    Hummed46 Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2018
    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Thanks for the insight ianjoub. I personally think specialization breeds efficiency, but I see the merit to your advice. In any case you're farther along than I am so your opinion means something for me.
     
  5. thepumpguysc

    thepumpguysc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2010
    Messages:
    4,453
    Occupation:
    Master Inj.Pump rebuilder
    Location:
    Sunny South Carolina
    That's some really good insight there Ian.. I didn't put the 2 n 2 together.. location & equipment..
    Seeing the poster is in PA & their winters are longer than their summers.. a snow attachment is a wonderful idea..
    AND can be a "selling point" when going after new jobs..
    Hummed,>> "oh by the way, when winter hits, I also have a snow thrower that might come in handy on this property"..
     
  6. Hallback

    Hallback Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    935
    Occupation:
    Contract logger and cutter
    Location:
    Centralia Wa.
    Answered your own question, if you don't know much about the industry then stay away from it. And never expect work you have to go out and earn the work and hustle for it.
     
    Mother Deuce likes this.
  7. Hummed46

    Hummed46 Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2018
    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Thepumpguy...thanks for the response. Good point.

    To my original question, how busy are you guys? I posted a survey up top...that would be easier than typing it all out.
     
  8. SpaceDog67

    SpaceDog67 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2018
    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    OHIO
    sometimes even 7 days per week, depends on how much work needs to be done.
     
  9. trekkar

    trekkar Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2018
    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    CT
    I'm looking to reclaim about 4-5 acres of forest land, I'm not sure how much work is out there but I got a quote from a mulching company for 25k. They would come in and mulch everything all trees and stumps I would be left with just the rocks and dirt. ready to plant seed. Thats with all the trees I guess it would cost more if I sold or gave away the trees first. What type of clearing can you do with a t770? Is it just the brush? or dost it dig down and get any of the stumps? I'm in CT so obviously to far but what would it cost me to have the 4 acres of brushed mulched up and mulch the stumps down if possible?
     
  10. Jonas302

    Jonas302 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2015
    Messages:
    499
    Location:
    mn
    It all varies too much to give much of an idea on price different woods different equipment ect Final use of the land is a big factor too
    with a fae head on a cat skidsteer we can get 3-5 acres of heavy brush down in a day to make pasture land trees and stumps add time above 4-6 inch hardwood take some time to grind up usually we would lay them down grind the tops and stack for firewood a lot of trees bigger than that are going to slow progress with a skidsteer mulcher Stumps can be taken to ground level with some time deeper I think a stump grinder works better
    What I would probably do is go in with a skidsteer to clear everything that was cost effective leaving bigger trees to be chainsawed its much easier to work them with all the brush gone they would be cut and stacked for burning or hopfully given away for firewood then go back in to do the stumps and tree tops if they were not burned
    We would be talking between 2000-10,000 to turn woods into pastureland with all the chips laying on top of the ground and stumps at ground level NOT plow ready
     
  11. trekkar

    trekkar Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2018
    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    CT
    How bad do rocks mess things up on the fae head? I've got a guy thats going to cut down everything and pile the brush. Can the fae head just drive in to the brush pile? I'm thinking the end product would be some type of hay field. So would crinding the stumps down be enough or would they need to be dug up? Here is a pic of the land to get an idea lots of rocks.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. ianjoub

    ianjoub Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2018
    Messages:
    312
    Location:
    Homosassa, FL USA
    You can grind up a brush pile with a mulcher but it is far easier to mulch standing brush and trees.

    More rocks = more dull teeth. You will have to spend some time sharpening.

    Grinding stumps would not be enough if you intend to plow.

    That looks like a better job for a wheel loader with a root rake. Either burn, tub grind, or haul off the mess.

    5 acres of that in FL would likely cost $5k to get done, not $25k.
     
  13. Jonas302

    Jonas302 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2015
    Messages:
    499
    Location:
    mn
    You can and I have mulched a pile but like Ian said its time consuming and not to fun looks like your in a area that burning would be acceptable? that would be the first choice The rocks add risk and money I just did one that looked a lot worse without breaking a tooth you never know when it will happen teeth are carbide and around 100 each
    No I can't see any way to make a usable hay field out of that with with a mulcher a meadow that could be maintained with a tractor and brush cutter yes something you would run a haybine and baler over no way you need a dozer and hoe to grub all that and get it somewhat smooth and rock free
     
  14. trekkar

    trekkar Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2018
    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    CT
    Excellent, thanks for the info. I got a guy to take all the wood and leave brush piles so I can burn those. I'll need to start looking for a larger excavator.