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House Demolition - Aussie style

Discussion in 'Demolition' started by RocksnRoses, May 12, 2009.

  1. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    So would this be a modular home or a caravan....it doesn't seem to have wheels?:D In the south we would say "You can't hide money" about a spread such as this.:bouncegri trailer-trash-hi-rise11.jpg

    :professorFrom redneckwiki - The term "You can't hide money" is a loose expression of when something is very tacky, IE: a purple truck with orange flames or a trailer park high rise. The term is meant to be sarcastic, referencing that the resources used to produce such an abomination could have been put to a much better use.
     
  2. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B Administrator

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    Those "resources" could take on a whole new dimension next time a hurricane arrives....literally.:rolleyes:

    The rednecks have a Wiki!!!:eek::eek:





    (How come everytime someone mentions trailer home the discussion takes a downward spiral):cool2:D
     
  3. Wolf

    Wolf Senior Member

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    Sorry


    Sorry, I did not mean to annoy you very nice and smart m8s. I would probably knock those old dumps down too happily, if someone were paying me to do it. Bet they are fun to take down and grind up. I hope you will accept my apology.
     
  4. Iron Horse

    Iron Horse Senior Member

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    Looks like a Smurf village .

    Someones signature , What colour does a Smurf turn when you choke him ?:D:D
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2009
  5. RocksnRoses

    RocksnRoses Senior Member

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    Apology accepted, Wolf. We are very nice, but smart, I'm not so sure, speaking for myself that is. I understand what you are saying about 'convenient demolition' in the cities, but that certainly is not the case in our situation. It is interesting demolishing those old buildings, because every one is different, some of the really old ones were built using mud to hold the stones together, instead of lime mortar. Nearly all of the old houses produce 2-300 tonnes of material and this last one, I took out a little over 400 tonnes, a little over a day's work with a wheel loader. What I marvel at, is that all of this stone was loaded by hand on to a horse & dray and carted in, the stone was all faced by hand and then the house built by hand, 400 tonnes of it. Those are some of the things I think about, when knocking them down.

    Rn'R.
     
  6. bear

    bear Senior Member

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    Squizzy your knowledge of stone and masonry amazes me. I'll never give you a hard time for knowing any of that kind of thing. There are many of the old arts that are constantly being lost I'm glad to see you are keeping one of them alive. Personally i'm trying to learn some blacksmithing and metaalurgy in between my other interests. RnR good job as usual Was the water tank for drinking and general home use? 400 tonnes of material is a heck of alot no matter what era it was hauled in I think, and in those days bleeding amazing.
     
  7. RocksnRoses

    RocksnRoses Senior Member

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    Thanks, Bear. The water tank would have been for everything, because in those days, there was no other water supply. Most of the old houses had in ground tanks to collect all the water from the roof. These days we have a reticulated water supply from the River Murray. It is rather ironical that water supplies are being cut, because the River Murray is running dry and everyone is blaming Governments and irrigators, yet our pioneers survived quite well by using some rather ingenious methods to collect and save their own water. What's more, the in groud tanks were dug by hand as well and some of them were huge.

    Rn'R.
     
  8. Tex3406

    Tex3406 Active Member

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    If our pioneers had to work with the rules and regulations of today, this country would not have been settled.


    Every house should have an in-ground tank. Even on the hottest summer day you can still get a drink of cool water from the hand pump on our in-ground tank in the backyard.
     
  9. EddieWalker

    EddieWalker Well-Known Member

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    Great thread and very informative. I thought the same thing as some of the others in that it was a shame to destroy that old building, but after reading the replies and what it takes to fix them, realized it was the smart thing to do. I know that if it was on my land, I'd remove it too.

    As a home remodeler, I struggle all the time to explain to clients that it will be cheaper, faster and in the end, stronger to tear down their homes, barns or additions and build brand new. Most don't get it and insist that what they want is to save what is there, but fix to problems with it and then update the space. Most of the time, that's just what I do. Every now and then, we tear it down and build all brand new. It really is a huge difference in what you end up with compared to what you spend.

    With enough time and money, anything can be fixed and made nice. It's just a question of how much is the client willing to spend?

    Eddie
     
  10. bear

    bear Senior Member

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    thanks for the info RnR, I didn't know if wells were dug or what exactly went on. Something else I was wondering, with all the limestone how rare or abundant are springs and caves in the area? Here we have cave systems and springs everywhere seems like. I don't know if conditions there are favorable for that kind of thing or not. Eddie Walker glad to see your kickin around, how's that pretty spot you have coming along? the yunguns growin good? don't work too hard... :D
     
  11. RocksnRoses

    RocksnRoses Senior Member

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    Not that far from where we live is a small area where a few wells were dug and there is good drinkable water at about 15'. My grandfather and his neighbours used to draw water from there in the early days. We have an unused bore on our property, but it has a salt content of 8,000 parts per million and is just suitable for livestock. Because of our relatively low rainfall (16") there is not a lot of recharge for underground water. We have no springs, but in some areas they do have quite a few bores and the water is quite good for livestock. There are some caves on top of a hill and they run a kilometre or more underground, but a lot of the openings are fairly small and you have to crawl through them, although professional caving groups quite often go down there exploring.

    Rn'R.
     
  12. B1G DIG

    B1G DIG Member

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    effn love them VOLVOS
     
  13. RocksnRoses

    RocksnRoses Senior Member

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    They have been good reliable trucks for us, B1G DIG.

    Rn'R.
     
  14. Wolf

    Wolf Senior Member

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    Any more demo going on down under these days, m8s?
     
  15. RocksnRoses

    RocksnRoses Senior Member

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    Not at the moment, Wolf. I have just finished a base for a new shed to house a large seed cleaning plant, at the moment I am doing a base for a new set of sheep yards and next week I have to re-shape an area around a small winery for car parking and water drainage. Still keeping busy, which is the main thing.

    Rn'R.
     
  16. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B Administrator

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    I demolished the hell out of a 2lb steak on the weekend.
     
  17. RocksnRoses

    RocksnRoses Senior Member

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    How's the Cholesterol?:D

    Rn'R.
     
  18. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B Administrator

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    Terrible ...but thanks for reminding me:rolleyes::D
     
  19. bill onthehill

    bill onthehill Senior Member

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    Squizzy you need more lipitor and smaller portions!
     
  20. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B Administrator

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    I ate the salad too:eek: