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Hancock Elevating Pull-Type Scraper

Discussion in 'Scrapers' started by kb9tci, Dec 8, 2013.

  1. kb9tci

    kb9tci Senior Member

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    This summer, I ended up bringing home an old Hancock paddle scraper. I saw it setting in the yard of a local equipment consignment auction house, so I ended up placing an absentee bid. I expected to not even come close, but whaddaya know, it was mine!

    It is relatively straight, but it had the typical repairs of something of that age. Patch plates here and there, with some added supports where previous owners thought it needed some...

    I pulled it home - most of the way. I ended up blowing one of the airplane tires that had about 10 layers of cords showing, about a mile from home. That was a story in itself... Needless to say, after the farm tire man could not get the bead loose, I pulled it home anyway.

    A few cylinder replacements and one repaired, I popped a few hoses. After a few trips to town, I got to try it out. Heavy old beast!

    Does anyone know much about these? I haven't decided if I'm keeping it or not, but I would like to paint it up anyway. I'm not sure of the capacity or what color its supposed to be. It may end up Cat yellow when I paint the 955l.

    IMG_20131208_093932_123.jpg

    IMG_20131021_170637_510.jpg
     
  2. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    That's a nice find kb9tci. It's my understanding that Hancock Manufacturing pioneered the elevating scraper. I never was around the pull type version like you have but have hauled many a load with a Wabco C pull elevating scraper. The trail unit on the Wabco was of Hancock design. http://www.ritchiewiki.com/wiki/index.php/Motor_Scraper

    That looks like a great setup pulling the Hancock with the Oliver. Just by the looks I'm guessing its around 8 yards.
     
  3. kb9tci

    kb9tci Senior Member

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    The oil' oliver can pull it, but I definitely need some more weight!
     
  4. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    That's a pretty cool Oliver, Is it a 1955 ? My last issue of heritage iron had a nice article on (EL TORO) version of that model www.heritageiron.com/store.php?crn=220&rn=502&action=show_detail


    Does the Hancock seem to load well? I could see a lot jobs where a pan like that would come in handy. Don't see many pull type elevating pans around . I'm kind of surprised more company's don't offer them . With the farm tractor having the PTO I would think it would be a big advantage.
     
  5. Buckethead

    Buckethead Senior Member

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    I know Hancock made the bowls for most early self loading pans. Except for Cat. Cat used Johnson for the J619 and J621. Hard to see from that pic, does the floor slide back to dump? I don't see the rollers for a sliding floor.
     
  6. kb9tci

    kb9tci Senior Member

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    The Oliver has been in the family for 3 generations! It was the first front-wheel-assist in the area. It is an old 1850 diesel with the 6-354 Perkins. It runs a little stronger than it did at the factory :)

    It likes certain conditions for soil from what I've seen. Sod is a hard pull. Disked soil kind of piles up at the front. It will cut clay real good and leave a shine.

    I have not got to try it too much, yet. I am curious what it can do. The 1850 will pull it pretty good since it has a narrower cutting edge for the size.
     
  7. kb9tci

    kb9tci Senior Member

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    It's pretty slick with the dump. The pan is split in two halves and both dump forward at the same time. It uses one set of cylinders with linkages.
     
  8. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    Sounds like the Oliver is part of the family, That's cool! We have a few tractors on the third generation as well. When starting a job on sod I like to disk up the ground first just to break it up so the grass will mix in the dirt & spread better. Something else you might look into is adding teeth to the cutting edge . They make a world of difference loading. We have 6 teeth on the Wabco.
     

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  9. kb9tci

    kb9tci Senior Member

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    That's a good idea on the teeth. I am going to try it out a bit this spring/summer to see what it'll do. We are building a house with a walk-out basement and reshaping a pond, so I am going to be trying it out quite a bit alongside the 955L.

    Olivers have been in my blood since I was born. Our family has bled green with no Deere blood :) Quite an assortment starting with a Super 55 and ending with the 1850.
     
  10. kevin37b

    kevin37b Well-Known Member

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    Do not disc , you will regret it .
     
  11. Maurice Muenks

    Maurice Muenks Well-Known Member

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    See post # 852 In Wabco Scrapers at work. Originaly the scraper had six teeth in the middle and then we went to the system pictured. That made a dirt hog out of her, 22 yds in less than a minute. (stay out of my borrow pit!)
    Wish I could get the old gal fixed up enough to make a video to show how well that worked.

    Maurice
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2014
  12. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    That's interesting Maurice. Mine would have had 4 teeth to begin with then we decided to add the two outer teeth later. Pretty happy with it. We also figure about 45 seconds to one minute on load time. Amazing machines for there time and today's standards;)
     
  13. truckdoctor

    truckdoctor Well-Known Member

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    My dad had one when we still had our farm. I remember my dad saying it was one of the better ones available. I remember it worked great until we blew up the drive for the elevator drive box. We couldn't find another drive or components so it became a pull scraper. Knowing what I know now I would have adapted a John Deere or Cat speed reducer to it.
     
  14. RZucker

    RZucker Senior Member

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    Ive seen a couple of these sitting in the weeds in my area. I also had a customer that had a later model 11E-4? pull type with a hydraulic drive elevator, the drive pump was mounted on the dolly frame and ran off a shaft from the tractor PTO. The owner said a Case 4490 with single tires was the cats meow to pull it with.
     
  15. kb9tci

    kb9tci Senior Member

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    I really like the idea of the teeth. I have looked around on the interweb a bit and have found some teeth and weld-on brackets pretty affordable. Around $200 would buy a set of 8 H&L style teeth and adapters.

    I have not worked this machine enough to decide if I am going to fall in love with it or paint it up and put it up for sale. It will probably get a coat of yellow when I paint the 955L either way...

    I picked this machine up before I got the 955L. I've already got the dump truck, so I have considered letting this one go. Then again - one can never have too much equipment, right? I will keep telling myself that until my wife let's me know different ***
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2014
  16. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    I think you will notice a big difference in the scraper with the teeth installed kb9tci. I looked around some and so far the only current builder of a self loading pull type scraper I could find is Miskin. Note the teeth on the cutting edge. http://www.miskin.com/Elevator.htm
     
  17. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair . . . On J621's and 627's I thought the tooth adapters bolted on using the cutting edge bolts . . . or am I misrembering?

    Cheers.
     
  18. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    Don't know about J621's or 27's Scrub but the four center tooth adapters on my Wabco in post 8 are bolt on. The two extra that I added on the outside were John Deere bolt on . I had to modify them abit then we welded them to the cutting edge. Teeth were good for about 800 to 900 loads on the last job. Most of it was clay but got in to some sand stone at the bottom. The way I look at it is if teeth help on a backhoe or excavator bucket they also seem work good on a elevating scraper cutting edge. In a way I'm ripping & loading at the same time .
     
  19. fjdrill

    fjdrill Member

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    kb9tci That's a older model hancock. later they went to a wider flights on the elevator and btm sliding door with a blade that dropped down when the slidng btm moved back , then a back gate completed pushing the material out. Never saw one of those work but I did see one up close in Ark one time-many years ago. Had a Johnson 11yd that dumped simular to yours once. worked well. I have A 12E (pull type) and a 292c now. Use a moline G1000 (100hp)to pull the 12E. The peope at Claredon mfg in tx can tell you all about your scraper (supply parts). The elevator drive gear box is from a 1.5 ton ford truck about 1940-45. So,Be gentle with it. I had to cut a tree out of the way to get a pinion one time. Also, the cuting edge is supposed to stick out farther( 6-12") under the elevator than on the sides. the reason is that the elevator will not pick up the material on the out sides and it will pile up there and just get drug along.
     
  20. kb9tci

    kb9tci Senior Member

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    Fj, thanks for the info on the gearbox. I can see the resemblance, now!

    Would you happen to know the official model number and capacity? I still haven't decided if I'm keeping it yet. I have not put more than a few loads through it after it was spruced up last fall.

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