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Gth-844 genie leveling issue

Discussion in 'Forklifts/Telehandlers' started by Greenmonzter, Feb 24, 2020.

  1. Greenmonzter

    Greenmonzter Member

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    Occupation:
    carpenter/framing/ heavyequipment
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    kansas city missouri
    Does a 2012 genie 844 have a self leveling feature?? I dont mean chassis sway when working on a hill .. I mean like driving over uneven ground.
     
  2. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    They don't "self level", but what they will do is allow the rear axle to oscillate so it can move and adjust to uneven terrain if the boom is below 60 degrees. If the boom is above 60 degrees it will lock the rear axle oscillation cylinders causing the machine to walk funky on uneven terrain. As long as you have the boom below 60 degrees, and the system is working correctly allowing the rear axle to oscillate, while you're walking a load over uneven terrain just do it slowly and use the leveling switch to move the front axle oscillation as desired to keep the load level.
     
  3. Greenmonzter

    Greenmonzter Member

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    Well ive always keep my hand on the sway button when driveing over uneven ground.. And never have had a problem with it .. But On one of our site's we gotta a real picky forman.. Our machines aint new they all got 5 to 6k hours on it. I was trying to recreate the complaint and i did.. I slide the back right down into a drainage ditch and tried to pull it back up on the road as i did that the front left tire came off ground and lost traction.. I was able to correct that with chassis sway and pulled back on road.. The foreman say that that tire shouldnt come off the ground if machine was working correctly.. I think he's just being difficult... Am I in the wrong? Or is there something i can do to fix problem..
     
  4. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    Hard for me to say without seeing the situation myself, which ain't really possible. Keep in mind the rear axle will only oscillate a given amount, you could have been in a situation that was more than the axle could oscillate. Again, I can't say for sure because I'm not there viewing it. But back to the machine, it's a simple test. Lower the boom below 60 degrees, heck, flat horizontal boom for that matter. Drive the right front wheel up on a 6 x 6 block while watching the rear axle lock cylinder behind the cab. Stop on top of the block. The rear axle lock cylinder should have moved, allowed the rear axle to "oscillate" to account for driving on the block with the front axle. If it did, raise the boom above 60 degrees. Now drive the machine forward while you turn around and watch the rear axle lock cylinder. As you move off that block that cylinder should not move. Once you get off of the block, lower the boom while watching the rear axle lock cylinder. If things are working proper, once the boom gets below 60 degrees that cylinder should "unlock" and you should see it let go from the bind it was in from being on the block. If it does all this it's working proper.
     
  5. Greenmonzter

    Greenmonzter Member

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    Id say that the rear axle is oscillating. Check out the attached pic.. I figured it was okay just an a**hole forman, that isn't a operator..
     

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  6. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    It most certainly is. And again, if it's working properly, in that situation shown in the pic, if you were to raise the boom above 65 degrees it should lock that cylinder so when you drove forward onto level ground the axle wouldn't move and it would make the machine unstable. Whenever one operates a telehandler, by nature of sites they work on, many times they are on uneven or unlevel surfaces. For that reason the operator should position the machine as best they can before they raise and telescope a load so once the boom is raised then the need for travel forward and reverse will be minimal.