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Grain bin demo

Discussion in 'Demolition' started by chuey, Jan 12, 2013.

  1. chuey

    chuey Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I've got a grain bin demo project I am looking at but needing sum advice from more experienced demo experts. There are 4 bins to be torn down. 3 are 48ft to the bottom of the roof & 75ft diameter. 1 is 40ft tall & 60ft diameter. All metal to be scraped & all concrete footings removed & hauled away & filled back. Depth of concrete is unknown. What's the best way to start on taking the bins down? Whats the best way to estimate the amount of concrete to haul off? equipment i have is a cat 320 55ft long reach, deere 892d-LC excavator, cat 320 excavator with hammer, deere 750c dozer, deere 323d ctl with grapple, cat 305 mini excavator with thumb, tandem axle dump truck, & frameless dump trailer with tractor. Any advice on this project would be very helpful. Haven't done one quite like this before. Thanks guys
     
  2. jxm7202

    jxm7202 Member

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    Maybe you could contact a local grain bin contractor and see what they would pour for a footing on bins that size. The manufacturer of the bins could also tell you what it would require for footings. No idea on taking the bins down.
     
  3. chuey

    chuey Well-Known Member

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    Yah I thought bout doing that n we farm too & have a grain elevator so I kinda have a little idea but they are older bins. Back then concrete was cheap so instead of using sand or gravel as fill they just poured concrete. Thanks for the input
     
  4. Colorado Digger

    Colorado Digger Senior Member

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    From the sounds of it you have plent of iron to complete the project. I would head out to the site and do some measurements and size it up. Run the numbers both ways, by quantities and unit prices and also by the hour. Get a feeling how long it will take and put some numbers to it. The concrete is usually the biggest deal but it probably does not have alot of steel in it.
    Good luck, Cd
     
  5. roddyo

    roddyo Senior Member

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    On 5 thousand bushel and under i just reach up and grab the roof panels one or two at a time then grab the sides and pull it apart working my way down. I use a 315 with a hydraulic thumb. There isn't much to a galvanized bin. It better to take it down a piece at a time if you can. These sound like a pull them over and tear them apart job.

    Concrete isn't much down here. About half what you would expect with a couple of rebar around the edge. I just break it up with the bucket. Your in corn country....that could make a difference in the concrete. If it was done right.

    Here... concrete 6 inches in the middle. 8 to 10 inches around the edge. Not much reinforcement.

    Scrap value....about 10 cents a bushel.

    Your mileage may vary;)
     
  6. chuey

    chuey Well-Known Member

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    On tearing the bins down would u cut the anchor bolts before trying to pull it over?
     
  7. roddyo

    roddyo Senior Member

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    I never do. You can almost take on down piece by piece if you leave it standing.

    Big as yours are it's going to be a little different.

    I would run a bucket tooth around a seem from a little ways then reach up with the grapple and start pulling to top off.
     
  8. chuey

    chuey Well-Known Member

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    Wasn't sure if it was better to cut them or not cuz by cutting your susceptible of it moving the wrong direction & getting away. There are other bins around them that are staying so dont want to do any damage. I was thinking I could reach up with the long reach & start ripping down 1 side & knock down the roof. Then reach across & pull the other side down little at a time. Once its down low enough for my big excavator start really ripping it apart into small enough pieces to haul off. Once I get the 1st one down I won't be near as worried. Getting everything hauled off is the time consuming part. Thanks for the advice guys I really appreciate it.
     
  9. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    Do you have room to pull it out and have an area to demo it? If so, I'd throw a cable around it, suspend the cable up on the side in back somewhat and cut the anchor bolts the whole way around the bin and pull it off the foundation and into an open area, then have at it, with a long reach boom, I'd flatten it out, then sit on it with a dozer to anchor it, and then tear it apart with the excavator and load it up. Before I'd bid the concrete, dig beside the bin and see how deep it goes, figure its solid concrete and have plenty of rebar in it, then fill it back in again, if others have to bid on the project. Do you have a shear for cutting rebar? . With bins this size, they'll have some pretty good size rebar in them, and a lot of them. As for tearing them down in place, I don't think I'd do that, if they go wrong, it gets high priced, the reason why I'd pull them off and aside to do the demo. As for getting anything out of the scrap, it'll cost more to haul it off than what you get for it, its more bulk than anything.
     
  10. roddyo

    roddyo Senior Member

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    For 2 cents under my scrap yard will send out a demo trailer. Of course I'm a heck of a guy;)

    The last two 5K's I took down was around $1,300.00 for the pair to tear down and load the metal,
    Break up and bury the concrete. That was with a 66 inch mop out bucket. It wasn't a big enough
    job to get a two foot bucket....and I got a hyd quick connect:)
    The guys scrap check was about $850.00 on that job.

    If your worried about the concrete hammer drill the middle and see how much it steps down from
    the edge thickness.
     
  11. chuey

    chuey Well-Known Member

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    There is room to pull it over but no way for me to get a cable up on it so could I cut all the anchor bolts grab the roof with the long reach & pull over? Once I get the 1st one down & out of the way ill have plenty of room but that initial one is my fear. As far as the concrete goes we just tied to estimate it high. There was no way to dig beside it as it has pavement all the way around. I do not have a shear but if I get sum pieces that won't come apart due to rebar ill just have to use the old fashion torch. The scrap metal actually adds up quite a bit. Weighing at over 105k each bin. I have the actual numbers at the office but I can't recall them at the moment. The scrap yard is only 6 mile round trip from the site so not much haul. They said the galvanized steel is tin price which is $205 per ton. Good chunk of money when ur talking 105k x 4. We haven't heard any word yet on whether or not we got the job. Had to put together the bidding in under a week. Luckily for us we found a big trucking company to subcontract to haul the concrete & a place 30 miles away that takes concrete for free. Plus we just removed a railroad track & haul plenty of rock/dirt fill to get rid of. Basically just charging trucking & a little to load it. Thank u Guys for ur input I really appreciate it
     
  12. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    Keep us updated at to if you get the job and how it turns out, I'm curious as to how thick the concrete ends up being, around here a bin that size, just the foundation would end up being a challenge to break up, and get hauled away. As for the cable, use extension ladders, one on the inside, another on the outside and go up a ways on the side, drill some holes in the bin, hook up a chain on the outside and then use a block and tackle and pull the cable up a ways, hook the cable to the chain holding the block and tackle and then loop the cable around the bin, also anchoring it as you go with a short chain to the side of the bin, hook it to a cat and pull as you also pull on the roof or top with the long reach, that way it can't get away from you. I'm guessing it sits close to a leg and other bins, we've also used a telehandler and stood on the forks with a harness on to do it with instead of using ladders on the outside, just cut a hole in the bin, then reached in and bolted the short chain through the side that way, no ladders needed, did it as you go around the bin reaching in with the telehandler as you go, also using it to raise the cable up. You might buckle the bin with the cable, but as long as you don't lose grip on top with the long reach, it can't get away from you, just make sure the dozer operator does as he's told and you'll be fine. The cable will help keep it from bulging outwards and back into other bins, the dozer operator won't have to move much, don't let them get carried away jerking or pulling.
     
  13. roddyo

    roddyo Senior Member

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    The bigger the bins the less they weigh per bushel....usually.

    I'm like Randy, hindsight is going to be interesting in regard to the concrete.

    Good luck.
     
  14. chuey

    chuey Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Southern Indiana
    Thought I would post on here & give u guys an update the grain bin demo. We had the low bid & the project made it quite a ways up the corporate ladder but it has now been put on hold.