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Gland wrenches - Case 580B

Discussion in 'Tractor/Loader/Backhoes' started by d2r, Apr 8, 2011.

  1. d2r

    d2r Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone have measured (maybe autocad?) drawings that would allow a novice to machine/ weld up some gland tools for the various 580B cylinders? You could really drop a bundle for the various cylinders @ 90 bucks a pop.

    I scanned the stabiliser gland end (4" o.d.) for my 73... but I'm guessing there has to be a more precise measurement.

    stab_glandsm.jpg

    The previous owner used a chain-end vice grip on the cylinders and you can see where it really chewed up the outside edges of the gland itself.
     
  2. alrman

    alrman Senior Member

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  3. nova481

    nova481 Well-Known Member

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  4. Tinkerer

    Tinkerer Senior Member

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    I made a pattern by taking a scissors and cutting U opening out of a piece of aluminum foil.
    I then laid it on the gland and carefully made shallow indentations in the foil for THREE of the pin holes. I used a hole punch to remove the indentations. I then laid the foil pattern on piece of 1/2 inch plate and transferred the marks to the plate.
    After drilling the holes I laid the plate on the gland and inserted all the pins. With everything in place I welded the pins to the plate on the exposed side that was facing me. I made the pins from grade 8 bolts. The bolts were long enough that I could use the unthreaded section of the bolt. To finish up I used a oxy/acetylene cutting torch to carefully cut a square hole for my 3/4 inch breaker bar. It didn't take too long to make,it was cheap and works perfectly.

    You may want to read this thread . The wrenches pictured are not mine but similar to mine.
    https://www.heavyequipmentforums.com/showthread.php?4263-Hydraulic-cylinder-repair&
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2011
  5. d2r

    d2r Well-Known Member

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    got to thinking about this after seeing a home-made wrench on another hef post. it seemed way more robust than the factory tool... and even then, the guy bent it with his 8' cheater bar.

    gland wrench.jpg

    alrman... hadn't thought about an adjustable gland wrench. how do they stand up?
     
  6. ScottAR

    ScottAR Senior Member

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    I have the OTC 1266 wrench and it has held up fine for the two I've rebuilt so far. Six foot cheater with a 200ish lb me on it.

    P.S. the $83 is a good price... just over jobber.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2011
  7. TOM V

    TOM V Senior Member

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    OTC face pin spanner 1/4" & 5/16" pins, 2" to 6" diameter. OTC #1266
     
  8. Rally_Action

    Rally_Action Well-Known Member

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    I'm with Alrman. An adjustable spanner or pipe wrench works well.
    Cost me $49AUD to buy a massive pipe wrench to do some cylinders on our JCB 3CX.
    I also bought a 3/4" drive socket set to do the rod end nuts, however the largest socket wasn't big enough :Banghead so we used the pipe wrench on them too.
     
  9. alrman

    alrman Senior Member

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    d2r - I make a living out of repairing Case Equipment, I've used the same adjustable wrench for about 20yrs & you could say it gets used on a regular basis. Maybe broken 4 or 5 pins in that time, I always carry spares.

    On a really stubborn gland I have a large piece of plate which I weld directly to the gland. Since I read of SUPERATCO's peinning method It's gathering dust under a bench. :notworthy
     
  10. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    LoL, works like a charm don't it bro. :)
     
  11. d2r

    d2r Well-Known Member

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    can't argue with that.
     
  12. chase546

    chase546 Well-Known Member

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    Where can I find this "SUPERATCO's peinning" method you mentioned?
     
  13. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Buddy just bought a 580CK E, someone used a punch on the gland nut holes so they will be a bear to remove, once out I will cut four new holes with a mill to replace them. Are on the pivot cylinders for the mast and are leaking.
     
  14. trevor b

    trevor b Well-Known Member

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    check ebay they have a whole page from 40.00 up cant build your own for that trevor b
     
  15. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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  16. alrman

    alrman Senior Member

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    :notworthy This pic needs a comeback! We need to celebrate the 9000 posts! :notworthy
    :beerchug
     

    Attached Files:

  17. chase546

    chase546 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the link. I will be trying that next trip out. Any secret tips on removing seized pins? lol 2 hours with a 40oz dead blow and it still wouldn't budge. Gotta love old equipment.
     
  18. alrman

    alrman Senior Member

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    Bigger hammer, preferably made of steel. :D
     
  19. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

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    Yeah, 40 ozs isn't even a good start. I usually use a 12 pound hammer, when necessary a 20 lb (that's 320 ozs!). And I agree with alrman, no other hammer is as good as a steel sledge for this. I've used dead blow, brass, and a few other hammers, none deliver the shock of solid steel. And, if you use a rod or drift to drive the pin, use a steel one to start it moving. A brass drift is less likely to mushroom the pin, but it absorbs shock, too. Shock is good, if the pin is really seized.
     
  20. Tinkerer

    Tinkerer Senior Member

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    And don't forget to wear safety glasses. I punctured my left eye cutting a cable with a wire rope cutter. A good friend of mine will spend the rest of his life with one eye blind. He was driving a track pin out a end-loader.