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Genie TZ34/20 Motor Controller

Discussion in 'Other Construction/Demolition Equipment' started by brevee12, Jun 26, 2020.

  1. brevee12

    brevee12 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2020
    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Iowa
    Update:

    I installed a new controller and added the fuse in. Ran for a couple days then quit. Same issues. Fried the controller somehow. Fuse is fine. I guess the next thing to do is add a contactor. I got your email with the install instructions on that and I'll just custom make all the wires and connections needed to install it. Do you guys think that could be the solution here? The place I got the controller from was nice enough to refund me the amount of the last one I bought so I'm not out that much but I doubt they'll do it again if I burn up a 3rd one.
     
  2. Engineer44

    Engineer44 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2017
    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    Portland
    I think I’d see if Curtis support could shed some light on this. The controller is reasonably sophisticated. It has over current protection and both high and low voltage protection built in. Batteries are pure DC (nice clean voltage). It shouldn’t be all that complicated, there’s 24 volts DC from the batteries, the controller, and the motor. When pin 1 gets battery voltage from the ground control box it enables (turns on) the controller and supplies power to the motor. 0-5 volts is supplied from the ground control box to pin 3 to control the speed of the motor. I’m surprised the controller failed before the fuse blew. The specs say it should be a fast acting fuse. I would expect it to burn open before destroying the controller. You say the motor is new. Is it the correct motor? I suppose it’s possible there’s an issue with the motor, arcing or intermittently shorting to ground. The contactor probably won’t help yet but it’s a good idea to install one. Unless the controller is being harmed when the motor is NOT being used? The contactor removes B+ (battery power) from the controller when no functions are being used. When it’s resting if you will. When you command the pump to run, the contactor closes to connect battery power to the controller. It’s hard to troubleshoot when it seems to all work fine for a while...and then it doesn’t. It’d be easier if it “stayed broke”.
     
  3. brevee12

    brevee12 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2020
    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Iowa
    After speaking with a rep from Curtis and someone from one of their dealers, I've determined that the controller I bought was in fact a knock-off of the Curtis model 1216-2351. My best guess is that the controller is blowing because it isn't rated to handle the same as the Curtis model even though they claim to be the same. The dealer rep also told me about how some of the Curtis controllers are programmable and if the one I need can be hooked up to a programmer, it will be able to tell me what exactly is happening when I run the machine.

    That dealer rep also said that the controller that is spec'd is pretty close to being to small to handle the demand from the motor. He recommended a different model that could handle much higher amperage amounts. Would I be able to just swap to a larger controller without changing other things? He also said that the hardest thing for the controller to do is limit the speed at which the motor turns. The slower it turns, the more power it has to get rid of through the mosfets and that is why they heat up and in my case explode.

    Lastly. My plan now is to order a name brand Curtis controller and get a clamp meter that is capable of reading the amperages that I might encounter. Then run the machine and watch each function for spikes.
     
  4. Engineer44

    Engineer44 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2017
    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    Portland
    Sounds like you’re on to something now. Glad the Curtis folks would help. As you said, their newer ones are programmable. Make sure you get it programmed right before they ship it to you. For example, I think the default undervoltage setting is too low for your application. I think it’s 12 or 16 and I’d think you’d want it higher. Upper teens nearer to 20. I also think their default speed control input is looking for a varying resistance. It has to be programmed to accept the 0-5 volts DC input that Genie uses.
    You can use a higher rated controller no problem. It’ll be physically larger but works the same. I sure would do that if I were replacing mine. I wonder what’s involved in getting their PC software to program and monitor the controller. I’d be interested in that depending on the cost. It’d be nice if they’d give it to you when you purchase a controller! Keep me posted.
     
  5. Engineer44

    Engineer44 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2017
    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    Portland
    When do you want to paint my house?