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For those who like old Macks

Discussion in 'Trucks' started by Truck Shop, Jun 5, 2016.

  1. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    This B71 sets about three miles from my house. Hidden in it's own little valley away from the public. It has a turbo 220 Cummins, total miles 221,000.
    No rust or rot even has the original keys. I'm working on owning this one. 1956 B 71. Sixty years young.

    Truck Shop

    002.jpg 001.jpg 004.jpg
     
  2. kenh

    kenh Well-Known Member

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    Looks great! Hope you get it.
     
  3. lantraxco

    lantraxco Senior Member

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    That's a find! What transmission(s) do it have?
     
  4. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    Can't tell about the rear wheels, but I notice Budd wheels on the front axle. Interesting to me as 1956 trucks would mostly have Dayton rims. Does anybody know when Budd rims were introduced? Just curious. :)
     
  5. lantraxco

    lantraxco Senior Member

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    May have been a West coast thing, pretty rare to see the Daytons on any tractor as I recall (This B model was built before I was born but still popular in my youth). Mind you my memory ain't what it used to be.
     
  6. RonG

    RonG Charter Member

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    Why don't you tease me Mike?I never saw a B-71 that I know of.It seems that the odd numbers in the model signified a Cummins such as B-73 etc but I have no rule book to guide me.I hope you get it and can't wait to see the results when you finish with it.Ron G
     
  7. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    Ron from what I can tell 71's, 73's and 75's were the Cummins powered models. It has Mack gear boxes-Z shift pattern on the auxiliary. Mack camel back suspension
    with Mack top drop rear drives. And last but not least Budd wheels all the way around. Oh and Westinghouse air brake system. This puppy was born the same year as me.
    And the puppy mounted on top of the radiator is in damn near perfect shape.

    Truck Shop
     
  8. DoyleX

    DoyleX Senior Member

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    Lever Puller, Gear Jammer, Pipe Twister
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    Minnesota
    And if you molest it in any way the truck gods will strike you with lightning. That gem has lived waaaay to long in original condition. You can still buy the missing driving light where the tow hook was bolted on from http://www.unityusa.com/

    B-71'S were made from 1953-58 0nly 522 were produced. Only engine from factory was NHB 743 cu.in. 200 HP. It had a BBC of 112 1/2". Radiator extended past fenders. It is the only B Series with this style front tin. If you see one there is no mistaking it for any other B-Model. Not many B-71'S left in any condition. Stole this clip thom the ATHS site
     
  9. RonG

    RonG Charter Member

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    I am pretty sure that the Mack engines,the 673 cu.in. and the 711 cu.in. were both 211 HP and aside from an head gasket occasionally on the 711 they were both pretty good engines.They put a turbocharger on the 711 after a fashion which helped with the headgasket issue meanwhile they increased the HP from 211 to 225 then to 250 on the 673 to compete with the 237HP 675 cu.in.Maxidyne.Ron G
     
  10. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    This one of my pen & ink drawings. The only things that I would add to that old girl is twin horns with mutes, 6" straight stack 3' above cab and a custom made visor.
    the bumper would remain the same just painted with white steel wheels. I have several other drawings on the HTF forum under old iron.

    Truck Shop

    IMG_NEW_0001.jpg
     
  11. farmerlund

    farmerlund Senior Member

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    That's a pretty cool old find. Amazing its all there and not full of bullet holes.

    That's a very superb drawing, I am jealous as I can barely sign my name. lol
     
  12. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    That's a good question willie ? From what I can tell the "Budd" style came before the " Dayton 's "

    Just looking at WWII vintage trucks I see Budd type wheels .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2½-ton_6x6_truck#/media/File:GMC_2_Half-ton_6x6_Truck.jpg

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/df/M26-tractor-1.jpg

    Our 1953 Insley Truck crane runs the Budd's as well . Probably cant tell from the photo but the center of the wheel is actually riveted to the outer part . Not welded .
    https://www.heavyequipmentforums.com/showthread.php?11692-K-12-insley&p=163656&viewfull=1#post163656

    I'm going to take a wild guess that the Dayton's showed up on trucks post WWII . I just don't know for sure :beatsme


    Hey Truck Shop , You better get that Mack bought bro ! She sure looks nice . Wheat looks good to .:)


    Did spot an interesting article about the founder of Dayton and early cast spoke wheels . Still did not see any time reference as to when the modern Dayton was introduced like what we use today . https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Walther_Sr.#Patents





    Probably under a patent number somewhere ?
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2016
  13. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    That wheat crop as in most areas around the base of the Blue Mountains will average 95 to 105

    Truck Shop
     
  14. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

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    There were a bunch of the old B models around when I started work at the quarry and for many years after well into 1970's. We had everything from B-42's up to B-81's. The even numbered ones were gas engines and the odd numbered ones were diesel.

    Sometimes wish I had taken the boss up on the offer of a B-42 it was in about the same condition as this one. It had a flat head six cylinder gas engine, can't recall if it was a Mack made engine or something like a Hercules or Continental. Price would have been, get in and drive it home! Just considered junk.

    Last I knew a guy over on the back road a couple miles from me still has his "Homebuilt" B model. His dad was actually the guy would got most of the old B's from the quarry he used for parts for his small trucking operation. This one son I'm told built his own truck from dad's "junk yard" and then managed to buy the last B model cabs Mack built. I haven't seen that black one on the road in a few years. These days I see him running a 10 wheeler Superliner, with the V-8! Think he has more than one, I know when we needed a air compressor gear for the V-8 1993 Superliner the company still runs he was the go to guy to borrow one till Mack could locate one.
     
  15. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    I can't say for sure myself TD, both the Dayton Steel Foundry and Budd Corporation have been around since the early twentieth century, and I can't find for sure when either of the companies first made the wheels we know today. I do see reference to Budd Corp making wheels for military vehicles used in WWII, and I'd wager Dayton wheels were in use at that time as well because you can see many trucks of that vintage with the Dayton spoke wheels, I just don't know who did it first.

    I can only speak for my area, but seems I recall back in the 60's and 70's, you take a B series Mack concrete truck with camel back suspension and the 46,000 lb rear axles they had the 6 spoke Dayton hub/rims. Same with the coal dump bodies mounted on DM or R model Mack trucks. I just don't recall seeing the heavy haul trucks in my area with Budd wheels back in those days, they pretty much all used Dayton hubs/rims. In my area I first noticed Budd wheels on OTR trucks.

    And don't get me wrong, I have no problem with Budd wheels on an old B series like Truck Shop posted, not at all. I guess I'm just partial to the nostalgia of the old Dayton spoke wheels on a vintage truck, the spokes just exemplify the old school heavy hauler. :)
     
  16. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

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    It seems to have been a regional thing, around here, it was Dayton rears, and Budd steers.
     
  17. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    The Dayton wheels were a derivative of early spoke wheels of the teens and before. From what I've found in the books I have cast Dayton style wheels
    arrived on the scene in 1928. The Budd wheel at the same time, give or take a few years. And my take on using budds on the steer is it runs truer when mounted. IMO
    And having a truck spec with Dayton's has never made a change in GVW on one heavy haul truck to another. Axle ratings seem to stay the same with either one. It's the
    axle housing and suspension plus tire ratings that seem to define that. IMO

    Truck Shop
     
  18. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    Agreed, from what I'm finding, both were making their debut in the early twentieth century. Remember, at this time, it wasn't a question of which was better or worse, a discussion we can have today. Rather, in the 1920's, this wasn't very long in years after the introduction of "the horseless carriage". For both Dayton and Budd, at that time, it was less a question of who was better and more of a matter the evolution of a better wheel for the new horseless carriage concept which by this time included trucks for transport as opposed to horse drawn wagons. An interesting subject of its own. :)
     
  19. lantraxco

    lantraxco Senior Member

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    I recall from my youth "old guys" calling the Dayton wheels "California" wheels, with more than a little derision... The Northwet (sic) is not known for our social skills, outside perhaps Seattle.
     
  20. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    My slang for Dayton wheels----Minnesota Mags, :)

    Truck Shop