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FMCSA cargo securement laws.

Discussion in 'Equipment Moving Questions' started by Jeff D., Sep 12, 2006.

  1. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Senior Member

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    Does anyone have a good understanding of the FMCSA's cargo securement rules?

    http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/truck/vehicle/cs-policy.htm

    I've read them over and over and can't make heads or tails of how many/what size chains I need to secure my backhoe & dozer down.

    It appears to me for equipment 10klbs+ you need 4 tiedowns:
    :for forward motion(braking) they must be able to withstand 0.8g
    :for rearward and side 0.5g

    I've 3/8" & 1/2" chain, w/no markings(so classed as grade 30?),so 2650 & 4500lbs WLL(working load limit)respectively.
    But when it comes to the aggergate WLL, what does it mean?
    For a 9400lbs machine will I need two seperate 3/8" chains from trailer, through equip., back too trailer on the front, and one 1/2", one 3/8" chain from trailer through equip. back too trailer on the rear to satisfy the letter of the law?

    That seems like alot of overkill, but maybe I'm not reading it correctly. Why must you half the WLL of the chain when figuring the aggregate total WLL?
     
  2. Ford LT-9000

    Ford LT-9000 Banned

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    A rubber tired backhoe is the worst thing to try strap down because the damn thing bounces up and down because of the tires.

    What we usually do is cross chain the back use two chains the front one chain is good enough.

    Most guys use grade 70 chain 3/8s gets used for strapping down the lighter machines and 1/2 is for the heavier stuff.

    Like a long time lowbedder told me chains just make the trailer roll over when the machine decides to slide off.

    If in doubt put more chains on it :yup

    Some guys like ratchet style cinches some like face rearrangers (lever cinches). I use lever cinches as they are pretty common here. Also people call cinches Boomers in different parts of the country.
     
  3. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Senior Member

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    I would think that's adaquate too, but by reading the laws it hard too tell if it would be legal that way.:beatsme
     
  4. Ford LT-9000

    Ford LT-9000 Banned

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    The DOT makes so many stupid rules and half of them that make the damn rules have no experience in the field what so ever.
     
  5. Mike J

    Mike J Well-Known Member

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    The way I read it is that you need at least 4 tie downs if it is 10k or over. In the general part is says there has to be 2 tie downs for the first 10 feet of total length and then 1 additional tie down for every 10 feet after that. It also says that any hydralic accesory such has a boom needs to be lowered and secured to the vehicle.

    The aggregate is just the total.

    "Issue 4: & sect;393.106(d) - Determining the aggregate working load limits for tiedowns.
    Agency Policy: The aggregate working load limit of tiedowns used to secure an article or group of articles against movement must be at least one-half times the weight of the article or group of articles. The aggregate working load limit is the sum of:

    1. One-half the working load limit of each tiedown that goes from an anchor point on the vehicle to an attachment point on an article of cargo; and
    2. The working load limit for each tiedown that goes from an anchor point on the vehicle, through, over or around the cargo and then attaches to another anchor point on the vehicle.
    Discussion: Based on numerous telephone inquiries from FMCSA field offices, State enforcement agencies, and industry groups, FMCSA has determined that the intent of & sect;393.106(d) is not easily understood. During the notice-and-comment rulemaking process, the agency proposed certain requirements that would necessitate the distinction between what were referred to as " direct tiedowns " and " indirect tiedowns. " After reviewing the docket comments, the agency attempted to adopt a more straightforward approach for calculating the aggregate working load limit, while preserving the potential safety benefits of making the distinction between the two types of tiedowns. While the language in the Final Rule is easier to understand than the proposed rule, it is still not sufficiently clear. This policy provides an effective approach for adding working load limits for individual tiedowns in a cargo securement system, and yields the same answer as the current regulatory language. "


    The way I understand it is that if you have a chain hooked to both sides of the trailer and the chain runs through the equipment (like through that hole in the ford backhoe where you get access to the hoses and valvebody for the hoe) then you take the wll of the chain, but if you had a hook on each side of the machine and you hooked the chain to the trailer and to the hook on the machine then you only take half of the wll for each chain but you would have 2 chains and it would come out the same. This doesn't make sense to me in all cases because if the chain is stretched from front to back to prevent forward motion and it has a certian work load why should the wll be cut in half?:confused:



    So... Wll needs to be at least 7520lbs to prevent forward motion and 4700 to the rear and to the sides. There also should be a chain over the loader bucket or loader frame in the front and also over the bucket for the backhoe. I didn't notice any thing saying that you need extra chains for the hydraulic accesories so I think you can include those as part of the 4 minimum. Having (1) 3/8 and (1) 1/2 inch chain that was 30 proof would actually be 370lbs short of being capable of .8 g's if they both go through or over the machine but i don't think that anyone would catch on.

    Also some people seem to go way overkill tightening up chains. The goal is not to try to pull the equipment apart or rip the chains before you even get the added loading of the machine trying to move. As long as the slack is taken up it is good.
     
  6. Grader4me

    Grader4me Senior Member

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    Attended a meeting yesterday concerning cargo securement. The above post explains it well. First, if you try to decipher all of this you will most likely go nuts. I think that the people who put it together doesn't quite understand it.

    Just keep this in mind....use chain, hooks and binders that have the grade marked on them. If you are hauling a backhoe for example use 4 individual chains, not one in the back and one in the front each going through a loop hole on the machine to the other side.

    The back boom on a backhoe has to be lowered and chained. Front bucket has to be chained (new to me). Any accessary, for example a spare bucket ...has to be chained.

    Try to have the chains at a 45% angle if possible to prevent forward and rear movement.

    Another thing that I found out....you would think that when using 4 individual chains you would use 4 binders. Lets take a roller for example...you can put the 2 chains in the front...back the roller up to tighten the chains, put the 2 chains on the rear with binders.

    I found it kind of funny that you have to use all of this grade chain/binders/etc so that your machine is super secure(and there is nothing wrong with that) but there is no specs on the anchor point. So you could have an anchor point on your trailer that is questionable as far as strength goes and still be legal.

    Jeff...as far as different size chains go, I would use the same size as long as it has a grade marked on it. Use the above procedure and you will be fine.
     
  7. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Senior Member

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    So, for a 10k backhoe you'de recommend 4 short chains(1/2" grade 43 or 70, one each corner of machine) two binders. Also an additional chain/binder for the bucket, and additonal chain/binder for the hoe.(those could be 3/8")

    A 10k dozer could be secured the same, ixnay the chain/binder for the hoe.

    Totals:
    (4) binders
    (4) 1/2" 6ft grade 43/70 chain
    (2) 3/8" 15ft grade 43/70 chain

    And that could cover securing either, and satisfy the law?
     
  8. Ford LT-9000

    Ford LT-9000 Banned

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    It all depends on what you are using for a trailer to haul this stuff. I would go with 8' chains you want them to beable to span the deck of the trailer you may even want them longer so you can cross chain a excavator.

    For lowbedders or even excavation contractors all they use is grade 70 it isn't cheap to buy but worth it.
     
  9. Grader4me

    Grader4me Senior Member

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    Jeff, I would say that what you have there should cover it. I think that the cargo securement laws are very similar between the two countrys. The only thing that I would double check on is the use of 2 binders as my above post stated. If I was you I would just want to make sure that the same rule applies in the U.S. but I am quite sure that it would.
    As far as the length of your chain goes....you know what you are hauling and the length you need. As well...make sure that you either wrap the excess chain or use a strap/wire to secure your binder handle after you tie down your equipment, you probally knew that anyway but they can ding you for it.
     
  10. atgreene

    atgreene Senior Member

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    I've been told similar by DOT here. Under 10k 2 grade 70 5/16" Chains. Booms, loader arms etc... require and additional 5/16" grade 70.

    Over 10k 4- 3/8" grade 70. Additional 3/8" grade 70 over any appendages.

    For your dozer, you may as well bite the bullet and get 5 3/8" grade 70 chains. Hook to the tracks and cross and loop one chain over the blade. As long as the chains and binders are stamped or tagged they'll have no beef with you.

    It may seem odd, but just hooking a grab hook to the edge of a track and crossing to the opposite side is legal around here.

    I was told this am that a local lawn care business got nailed $9000 for their pick up and trailers. Mowers and gas cans etc.. not properly secured. Weed wackers etc..., trucks not registered commercial with proper weight etc... etc...

    My 8k excavator gets 2- 3/8" chains, 2 5/16" chains, just to be safe.
     
  11. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Senior Member

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    After investigating the prices of chain, I'll be buying grade 70 3/8" instead of 1/2", for sure.

    1/2" cost about twice what 3/8" does. Also my current binders fit 3/8", so I'll won't have to pick so many of them up.

    I'm going to buy some 20ft's and cut them down in halves, or thirds, and put some new hooks on the ends. The chains can be fairly short for what I need. I've got unmarked 3/8" 20fts coming out of my ears, so I always have them for a back-up.
    Yup-yup:yup .I wrap bailing wire through the handle and chain to prevent it from coming loose.

    Thanks again all!
     
  12. T Red

    T Red Well-Known Member

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    393.112 Must a tiedown be adjustable?
    Each tiedown, or its associated connectors, or its attachment mechanisms must be designed, constructed, and maintained so the driver of an in- transit commercial motor vehicle can tighten them. However, this requirement does not apply to the use of steel strapping.

    been studying the regs to be compliant.

    Tim
     
  13. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Senior Member

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    Yeah, that's a good question. It would appear, by that, that every chain would need a binder.

    But if their main concern is being able to tighten it while in transit,I'd think simply moving the equipment slightly to tighten a chain without a binder, and adjusting at the other end would meet their requirements.

    Who know though?:beatsme It would probobly depend on what kind of mood they're in, at the time.
     
  14. tuney443

    tuney443 Senior Member

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    Yes,there must be a binder with the same or greater ratings than the chain.Here in NY,5 chains for a dozer,6 for a TLB,5 for an exc. without a blade,6 with.And yes, they must be tight--A trooper with keen eyes once saw my loader bucket jump up and he was right-it was loose--check and double check.
     
  15. Grader4me

    Grader4me Senior Member

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    I would check this out a little more if I was you. I know what we were told but regulations can be a little different when you cross the border. Probally just a phone call would do it. It would just make sense that tie downs for cargo would have to be adjustable as there are many types of loads, not just equipment.
     
  16. T Red

    T Red Well-Known Member

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    The way I read it you must use a binder on each tiedown.

    I figure it doesn't take that much more time to add a couple of binders then you know you'll be in compliance.

    If you do everything perfectlly and the dot officer is in a bad mood he'll still probably find something. I had a driver get pulled and checked out. The officer wrote him up for tires that were too wore. I measured every tire on the truck and couldn't find one in violation.

    A couple of years ago our county cattlemens meeting invited a couple of dot officers. Three came to the meeting. Three of the questions that came up the officers could not even agree on an answer. Even argued between themselves a little. They don't even know the rules enough to enforce them.

    Tim
     
  17. tylermckee

    tylermckee Senior Member

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    We always use two long chaines and 5 binders to move our excavators. One binder on each corner attached to the tracks, and the chain on the front ran over the bucket/stick with a binder on it. Don't know how legal it is but we usually only move our machines around in town, max about a 10 mile trip.
     
  18. Grader4me

    Grader4me Senior Member

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    I agree...for all the extra that it would cost

    This is one of the reasons I would go with all the binders no matter what I was told. Sometimes it seems to be the guys that really try to be in compliance that gets the shi**y end of the stick.

    I could tell you storys similar to this that would curl your hair. Sometimes it seems that they make their own rules as they go. Having said that, I know that they have a job to do, and I respect the fact that they are a necessity towards keeping our highways safe, but sometimes they go a little overboard. All that you can do is try and follow the regulations the best that you can, even though they seem to change continually.
     
  19. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Senior Member

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    "Issue 4: & sect;393.106(d) - Determining the aggregate working load limits for tiedowns.
    Agency Policy: The aggregate working load limit of tiedowns used to secure an article or group of articles against movement must be at least one-half times the weight of the article or group of articles. The aggregate working load limit is the sum of:

    1. One-half the working load limit of each tiedown that goes from an anchor point on the vehicle to an attachment point on an article of cargo; and
    2. The working load limit for each tiedown that goes from an anchor point on the vehicle, through, over or around the cargo and then attaches to another anchor point on the vehicle.


    I finally found an explanation on the FMCSA's website explaining how the Aggregate WLL is determined, since it didn't make sense to me either.(halving the WLL when using 2 individual chains instead of 1)
    They worded it very poorly. But by using their formula, it comes out that using shorter individual chains gives you a greater WLL than using longer chains that run over/ through the equipment.

    This is opposite of the "impression" their rules give when reading them.

    Much of my confusion was cleared up after reviewing their "hands on" guide.

    http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/documents/cargo/cargosecurement-16-04.pdf
     
  20. Dusty

    Dusty Charter Member

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    looks like i need more tie downs on my loader thanks for the links