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fixing hyd cylinder chrome

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by mog5858, Aug 19, 2020.

  1. mog5858

    mog5858 Well-Known Member

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    I am resealing the hyd cylinder out of my Euclid S7 scraper. I am less than happy with the condition of my chrome these are a single-acting cylinder of Euclids design with V packing and a dust seal. there 5.5" O.D. and about 26" long and hallow. this machine only sees 40H per year as it's a hobby machine. how do I fix the scratches 1 JB weld them sand it smooth? 2 weld up the bad spot file / turn back down. 3 Braze them up with some brass. Does anyone spray weld chrome? I work as a machines so I do have some tools to spy weld. I have heard of Belzona but never used it just like JB weld?
    I looked into re-chrome them but at 1100 each that out of the price range after you triple it. thanks for any help IMG_9141.JPG IMG_9141.JPG IMG_9219.JPG IMG_9144.JPG
     
  2. Ct Farmer

    Ct Farmer Senior Member

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    Sorry to say but the only real way to repair that is a rechrome. Some people have cleaned it really well and epoxied it but be aware that you run the risk of the patch coming loose and circulating in your system. There are many things that would not take kindly to a hard chunk of epoxy going through.

    If you are only using it 40 hours a year I would just leave it. Make sure there are no rough, sharp spots and run it as is. Just park it so the bad spot is not right at the seal to avoid leaking as it sits.
     
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  3. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

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    Yes, I would have to agree with CT, for that little use I would say smooth off any rough spots run it.

    Not real familiar with spry weld, seems I have heard of it flaking off if not done right and not sure you could do a isolated spot in the middle of a chrome tube like that without leaving a step or rough area. Also does the spry weld rust?
     
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  4. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    I'd shop around for a better price on re-chroming.
     
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  5. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    I might try tig welding up the big hole in the first pic with SS rod, then file flat and smooth with sandpaper. Probably leave the smaller ones?
     
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  6. mog5858

    mog5858 Well-Known Member

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    thanks, guys for all your input. if the jb weld did fall off I not too worried about my hyd system as it old gear pumps and big old sloppy spools vales.
    yes, spray weld can flake off if not done right. there really 2 different processes one for doing the whole shaft and one for fixing spots. might reach out and see if I can get any info from the company that makes the stuff.
    welder dave: got any leads my quote was from Dina hydraulics of Regina /saskatoon.

    Delmer I was thinking about that where to braze with brass or use s.s. or mild steel as it covered in oil all the time. then I would just turn it back round in a lathe get within a few thousand than just make sure no sharp edges
     
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  7. oceanobob

    oceanobob Senior Member

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    I have succeeded in silver brazing nicks. Not perfect but better than leaving it alone. The chrome akin to the repair takes a wounding but the overall smoothness supposedly helps the seal life - this being the idea of the repair.
    Brazing may be more astute with a common braze rod due to a little less heat time.
     
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  8. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    I've seen outrigger jack rods smoothed out with regular brazing and filed smooth. I think you could have new rods made for not much more than your rechrome price. I think the last cylinder rod I had made wasn't much over $500.
     
  9. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    Does the re-chroming cost include complete rebuilding of the cylinder(s)? I know a shop that repaired a hyd. cylinder rod for an elevator by stick welding with stainless rod. The rod was shipped in a tube to protect it but somehow gravel or something abrasive got inside the tube and caused a bunch of nicks in the chrome. He made an attachment for a die grinder to grind most of the weld off and then did the final finishing with a file. His die grinder had a threaded head so he made a little 4 wheeled carriage to mount the die grinder to. Could thread it on further to grind more but left the last little bit to hand file.
     
  10. Flat Thunder Channel

    Flat Thunder Channel Senior Member

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    I am guessing to repair it correctly the chrome in the damaged section should be ground off, welded up turned undersize and re chromed. Probably should grind the whole shaft down and chrome plate it in one shot.

    I was curious so I checked Alro just for giggles. A solid 5" chrome plated shafting cut at 30" is only ~$600 plus shipping. Not for sure of the features on the opposing end? Guessing it is hollow for weight savings.

    A solid machine shop could make you a new custom shaft, have it chrome plated and ground true. The only part that gets you is it becomes an expensive hobby at that point.

    My personal opinion I would just leave it as recommended above. Clean any sharp edges and burrs off and operate it as is. $1000 buys a lot of hydraulic oil. Only 'fix it' (up to factory standards) if she's an everyday on the job site unit.
     
  11. JD955SC

    JD955SC Senior Member

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    You are far better off smoothing it down and letting it ride than trying crap like JB weld
     
  12. mog5858

    mog5858 Well-Known Member

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    the 1100 cost for re-chrome was just to strip off the old and re-chrome that's all. I will do all the repacking my self. I would love to just buy off the shelf chrome rod but this rod is not of a typical design and well yes I could make something work then I would have to come up with a good way to salvage and weld the top back on as it was cast/forge all as one piece, not like modern-day rod where the eye is just weld on to the end of the rod. they used a brass ring as the piston cup on the bottom of the rod and the cut out is for oil. I don't think being hallow would be necessary but is interesting as it's sealed
     

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  13. Flat Thunder Channel

    Flat Thunder Channel Senior Member

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    Nice lathe! In my quick Alro search, from my previous post, I could not locate 5.5". They only be went up to 5". So that doesn't help you much in regards to remaking it with a purchased shaft.

    I'm sure it can be had from one manufacturer or another. I wouldn't trust my welding ability to reattach the eye. I would attempt a bolt on modification if it only pushed under load, but would out source welding if it pulled too. Saving old equipment is the name of my game, but it sure has lightened my wallet on more than one occasion. At least equipment maintains it's value more than a boat.
     
  14. Old Doug

    Old Doug Senior Member

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    I am anther for running it as is. I have saw stuff like this used for a long time as is.We put new seals in bad places and had good luck.
     
  15. bigrich954rr

    bigrich954rr Well-Known Member

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    I’ve use the Titanium Devcon Epoxy on deep nicks been holding for 2 years so far I use a carbide burr to clean up the nicks. Cleaned with brake clean then sanded smooth.
     
  16. mog5858

    mog5858 Well-Known Member

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    well, right or wrong I thought I would let everyone know what I did. I gound down the hole to a nice round spot with no sharp edges and bight clean metal then I tig weld up the holes with an s.s. kinda rod similar to 309. after I just ground off the top and then used a file to finish them off. the chrome acts like a filling button the file will not cut chrome as it too hard but the softer weld metal no problem checked each one for size with an O.D. mic and a fingernail to see if there's a sharp edge for anything to catch on. I guess only time will tell if this was a good or a bad idea. it really hard to take a good pic of chrome lol
    IMG_9245.JPG IMG_9247.JPG IMG_9317.JPG IMG_9319.JPG
     
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  17. .RC.

    .RC. Senior Member

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    Looks good.
     
  18. Jonas302

    Jonas302 Senior Member

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    Cleaned up real nice shouldnt give much trouble
     
  19. Tones

    Tones Senior Member

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    I was told years ago to use an oil stone (same as used for sharpening knives) instead of a file to get a proper finish on hydraulic shafts. It works good. :D
     
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  20. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    I think emery cloth/abrasive rolls could work too. It's used to polish motorcycle forks which is a similar application.