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First Timer to telehandlers

Discussion in 'Forklifts/Telehandlers' started by big builder, Feb 17, 2008.

  1. big builder

    big builder Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2007
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    ontario
    Hey Everyone,

    I am looking to buy a zoom boom for our construction business.

    We build cottage and residential homes and are starting our first subdivsion.

    I know nothing about these things.

    I don't think I want anthing too big yet. Something to lift pallets of lumber and sheet goods and you know...........whatever it is people do with these things. Maybe put a bucket on it for winter too. Maybe lift a few first floor trusses into place.

    Really I am just looking for peoples opinion on what they like and what to stay away from.

    Any opinion is welcomed.
     
  2. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B Administrator

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2005
    Messages:
    3,388
    Occupation:
    Digger Driver
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    Becoming more popular by the day. Somebody said the skid steer is like the swiss army knife of the construction site.....but the telehandler is a very universal tool.

    https://www.heavyequipmentforums.com/Forum/showthread.php?t=1400

    https://www.heavyequipmentforums.com/Forum/showthread.php?t=2751

    I would put parts availability as the No 1 priority. There are a lot of European Teles comming on the market here and no all are well supported.

    From what I have seen and heard, in terms of performance, they are all much of a muchness.

    https://www.heavyequipmentforums.com/Forum/showthread.php?t=2817
     
  3. stumpjumper83

    stumpjumper83 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2007
    Messages:
    1,961
    Occupation:
    Movin dirt
    Location:
    Port Allegany, pa
    down here in s.e. pa, it seems like every building crew has one. The mason uses them for moving blocks. The framers move stacks of lumber and set trusses with them if they are not too high. Roofers use them for material platforms. The siding guys hang the siding with them. I've used them for tree removal and snow plowing. Almost everyone is making them. IMO you want to get one with outriggers & joystick pilot controlls. Some allow you to level the machine by tilting at the axles, some allow you to angle the platform much like a 6 way dozer can angle his blade. That is nice if you can't come in square to the house. Look at your load charts to see that you are actually getting a heavy enough machine for what you wanna do. At 40 some feet out, the capacity is much less than right at the machine. For what its worth I like the gehl rs8-44, handy to use, good power, seemed to be pretty stable.
     
  4. JCBgm

    JCBgm Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    Messages:
    87
    Location:
    WV, OH, & KY
    Bigbuilder,

    There are a few things to consider. There are 3 configurations of telescopic machines.

    1. Lift and Place. These machines have a high boom pivot point and are typically used by masons. No outriggers. Generally a 3 section boom with a chain and pulley system for extending/retracting the 3 sections. These machines have a leveling cylinder on the front to level up the machine on uneven surfaces. Due to the "swan neck" at the fork end of the boom and the chain set up, theses machines should NEVER be used with a bucket. They are not designed for this type of use. JCB 508, Skytrak 8042

    2. Digging machines. These machines ussually have 2 section boom and limited reach (ussually around 26-28 feet). The boom extend cylinder is directly connected to each boom section. May have a z-bar setup on the carriage for high breakout. CAT TH330, JCB 541-70

    3. Multipurpose machines. These are generally the most expensive. Low boom pivot point. Heavier machines have outriggers. Can be used with a bucket, but fall between the two above as far as digging capability. JCB 550-140, JLG G10-55
     
  5. Nac

    Nac Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2004
    Messages:
    566
    Occupation:
    Construction
    Location:
    NJ
    I prefer Lull forklifts. It may be beacuse before going on my own I always worked for mason and concrete guys and Lull is the only thing you see. My fathers boss has owned over 25 Lull have tried others Gradell, Gehl and Terex and still will only by a Lull. Also Lull was the only company that had the sliding carige that made it easy to put a cube of block 6 frames up on the scalfold now I think there are other companys that have the sliding carige. I just accaried a Lull 1044B it is a 30,000 lb machine 10,000 lb capacity and has a max hieght of 44 feet.
     
  6. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2007
    Messages:
    9,212
    Occupation:
    Running what I brung and taking what I win
    Location:
    Alabama
    I have to put my $.02 in for ol' blue - The Graddall. I have a '98 534D6 that I bought new and have owned ever since. It has the framers carriage with pallet and block forks, tilting carriage and light duty bucket.

    I have used that machine so much for so many different things - still working on a job today. It's very simple to operate (once you get used to the Gradall steering), very reliable and is not computer controlled - we can go to NAPA and get any electrical part you need. I have put 3K hours on it since new and replaced the starter and batteries twice. The little Cummins still purrs but you need to plug it in if it gets really cold. All in all and excellent machine.

    We use it for framing, block/brick work, clean-up with the bucket (you can shoot it to the 2nd or 3rd floor window and shovel into the bucket), built Keystone walls with it, put the man basket on it and have an arial lift - pretty much a Swiss Army knife for the building side of my business. We recently used it to help remove an interior slab demo in a resturant remodel. We sawed the slabs in 4'x4' cubes, put the mini-hoe inside the building and shot the boom through a hole in the wall and loaded the slabs out to the dump truck. I bid the job using hand labor and jackhammer. Needless to say we had it done in 1/4 of the time and 1/4 under my bid. Ol' Blue is still a money maker.:D

    It is one machine I will probably never sell - it's worth more to me than the money it would bring selling it.
     
  7. thejdman04

    thejdman04 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2006
    Messages:
    582
    Location:
    Illinois
    Traverse and petti bone are pretty good imo
     
  8. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Messages:
    1,214
    Occupation:
    President and all else that needs done!
    Location:
    New York
    I have always used Lulls. I had two 7-C's, 4 844's and 1044B. They have served me well. Equipment is going cheap now as work contracts.
     
  9. albertozordan

    albertozordan Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2009
    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Breganze, Italy
    I can notice that Lulls are very popular overthere. Here in Italy and Europe too we don't know them too much. They look to me as the tipical US machine.

    Machines overhere seems to be more...how can I say, well designed than machine in US or other countries.

    Is it a wrong impression?
     
  10. big builder

    big builder Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2007
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    ontario
    I never did pull the trigger on a telehandler. Bought two bobcats instead.

    I would still very much like to find one if the opportunity presents itself.

    I am going to start looking again now that the prices for used ones might be down.
     
  11. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Messages:
    1,214
    Occupation:
    President and all else that needs done!
    Location:
    New York
    Prices are in the basement now. You need to see what you want to spend and the hieght and capacity you need.
     
  12. quebecmason

    quebecmason New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2010
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    quebec
    i'm a First Timer to telehandlers too, and i'm looking for a small telehandler, gradall 524-dS or a gehl rs, what do you think.
     
  13. Aero Lift

    Aero Lift Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2009
    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Detroit
    All are good machines, but I would agree with the individual who says parts should be of high importance. I am with a company who specializes in SkyTrak forklifts. They can range in all sizes and can be out fitted with many attachments. Also, from my experience the parts and support of this product is strong. It will be inevitable that the machine will break and you will want to get it up and running as soon as possible. SkyTrak forklifts have many universal products and our company is now selling used parts. Parts for SkyTrak (JLG) products can be found relatively easy with a little research.

    Good Luck