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Favorite Mills

Discussion in 'Mills' started by milling_drum, Dec 16, 2009.

  1. jenstarltd

    jenstarltd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Messages:
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    Location:
    Ottawa Canada
    I've seen you guys working in Altamonte Springs north of Orlando 10 years ago.
     
  2. jenstarltd

    jenstarltd Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Ottawa Canada
  3. milling_drum

    milling_drum Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2008
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    724
    Occupation:
    asphalt mill operator (ret)
    Location:
    out west lately
    Welcome Jenstarltd:)

    Who was it you saw in Altamonte Springs? Turtle? They are from Clearwater, Fl. However there is a BIG milling Company in Altamonte Springs (Mill-it) who run nothing but Roadtec. (so do Turtle)

    But do not be Dismayed, there are over 40 Wirtgen mills in Florida running besides those two companies mentioned above
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2011
  4. jenstarltd

    jenstarltd Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Ottawa Canada
    Yah I think it was Mill-it did you see my video about the rear traction I'm still working with Nashville to resolve the problem, other than that the 210 is a nice machine.
    Great forum I'm the only owner of Mills around here so not to many people to talk shop.
     
  5. milling_drum

    milling_drum Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    asphalt mill operator (ret)
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    I was up your way years ago with Miller Paving, we were working for a company they wound up buying, they were out of Arnprior. Can't remember the names, Smith's or something. That was around 1995 or so...

    Wirtgen has a pretty good support system, they should be able to solve whatever is wrong. I did notice in the video that the tracks were not slipping at the same time, which is strange if we were to think it was related to a weight problem. I'd like to believe it is a weight problem but its hard to tell. Do you have any traction issues like that when its cutting shallow depths?

    We should prolly move this conversation to the W210 thread, I'm sure the Wirtgen lovers over there would be keen to know whats up. None of this surprises me in the least, since Wirtgen started mass producing machines back in the late 90's things like this have been popping up.
     
  6. dg330

    dg330 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2012
    Messages:
    6
    Occupation:
    Paving, Milling Foreman. ALDOT
    Location:
    Alabama
    Hey Guys
    I am new to the fourm. And new to milling. I want to learn as much as I can. I work for the Alabama Dept Of Transportation. I have been running a Wirtgen W1900 solo off and on for almost 7 years now. I dont get to do alot of the real milling you guys do. We do mostly strip patching. Anyway, our W1900 has around 3100 hours on it now, and is due to be replaced. They are looking at getting a bigger machine I believe. The central office in Montgomery has already orderd the machine as it is used state wide by many districts. :mad: I have spent several days under the machine fixing other peoples screw ups, replaced several holders, had to drill and grind the set screws out of the drum because they wouldnt come out, we heated, and used a 1 inch impact, broke several sockets, not to mention several other things we have had to fix. Anyway. My boss wants us to purchase our on machine that wouldnt be used state wide. I have always been on a Wirtgen Machine, Know one knows anything about milling machines, and no one has tried to do there homework like I have. All my boss has seen run is Roadtec's. I do know we want a bigger machine than a W1900. What would be some of your suggestions. Lets say between these. A Volvo MT2000, Wirtgen W200, Cat PM201, Roadtec RX600E Can you guys give a comparison, and recomendation. Also what type of grade controls do you think we should get. Like I said, we do mainly strip patching, and extra depth milling for base failures, we very seldom do side streets or turning lanes.
    Thanks
    Drew
     
  7. Turtle

    Turtle Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2010
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    24
    Occupation:
    president of Turtle Southeast, Inc.
    Location:
    Florida
    We prefer teh Roadtec. We ran a demo with the MT2000 and found several safety features that make the machine cumbersome to work with. Particularly the objecvt detection system on the front tracks. It will stop if anything over 6" is in front of the track.
    We have peurchased a 600e and are very happy with it. my suggestion would be to get a keystone wedge lock drum on any mill that you buy. We get over 3,000 hours on a set of holders and they stand up to the toughest conditions.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2012
  8. dg330

    dg330 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2012
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    6
    Occupation:
    Paving, Milling Foreman. ALDOT
    Location:
    Alabama
    Thank you Mr Ando.
    What actually is a Keystone Wedge Lock Drum?, and how does it differ from a Wirtgen drum. Also, considering we are on the main line majority of the time. Should we stick with a 4 track machine? Please forgive me for the dumb questions. I am trying to learn as much as possible. BTW. I watched your promo video on youtube. I was very impressed. Top notch for sure!!!!
     
  9. dg330

    dg330 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2012
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    6
    Occupation:
    Paving, Milling Foreman. ALDOT
    Location:
    Alabama
    Found the keystone wedge lock drum. I see where that would be better. Thanks
     
  10. jenstarltd

    jenstarltd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
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    Location:
    Ottawa Canada
    Wirgen is my favorite but I have never tried anything else so........
     
  11. big tex

    big tex Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2010
    Messages:
    19
    Location:
    texas
    Kennametal 301 system is the best I have used. I would go with the Roadtec. You can order them with a Kennametal drum. The 301 is easy to change in the field if you break one and the bases are the biggest heavy duty weld on bases I think anyone has in common. Also, the holders can be changed with pullers provided by Kennametal and a sledge hammer. No worrying about bolts coming loose and needing tightened or seizing up and not coming loose when you need them to.
     
  12. milling_drum

    milling_drum Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    asphalt mill operator (ret)
    Location:
    out west lately
    Getting a few minutes with the keystone drum this year was nice. They are a good system. Durability would be a case proven in different types of materials. Some areas are difficult, others not so difficult. When it comes down to it with new people getting into the industry that will never see the older style heads, they will get comfortable with what's taught to them instantly and reject different types of heads based on the personal knowledge and ability they have using a particular brand. Americas finest products are the failure to give credibility to the "other", unused, untried product because we didn't know how to use it and we are scared to learn something new.

    301 heads I have run are great. Wirtgen heads MUST be maintained for the first 500 hours according to spec or they will fall apart. Sandvik have put out a head that looks and works much like a 301. Keystone have always been the preference of old school milling owners and operators. Over the next little while, I may put some effort into a data base of stats of head wear and production rate. Not sure where it will be posted but il let you all know.
     
  13. Toegrinder

    Toegrinder Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2009
    Messages:
    131
    Occupation:
    Milling Foreman
    Location:
    CO
    From my experience, Keystone's are a pile of crap
     
  14. dg330

    dg330 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2012
    Messages:
    6
    Occupation:
    Paving, Milling Foreman. ALDOT
    Location:
    Alabama
    Milling Drum. I know what you mean about the Wirtgen heads. Im fighting ours now. Loose holders and seized bolts, the other day, it lost hydraulic pressure to the brakes and locked down with me in the road. Its so aggravating sometimes, juggling between solo milling machine operator and paving foreman can be a bit stressful at times. Any ideas on getting seized holder bolts out? Didnt know if some of you veterans might know a trick.
     
  15. milling_drum

    milling_drum Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    asphalt mill operator (ret)
    Location:
    out west lately
    Theres a few ways to break em loose but make sure you replace ALL components new from now on. Most likely the block is shot and that can earn a shop day to get after a few of the others as well. Threading is the major drawback using impact but I've seen it used successfully many many times. Fine threads have never been good with impact, once you see the thread shavings you better have remembered the thread chaser. I'd nibble away at the drum until it got pretty tight, you are lucky you have limited units, changing out mills can be a problem.

    not to be rude but iv done a fair amount of cutting in alabama, some of that material can wear things out quickly and if you arent under pressure like mill subcontractors are you might wish to make sure of the road density early. Watch how fast you can run the mill after the drives are warmed up with good teeth, working off those numbers and some feel, if you know a tooth or two may be bad NEVER take the chance of another 2 or 3 trucks. By then your in trouble and might be down till lunch. (lunch? wtf)

    Talk to the roads supt, tell him you need a day or two for the drum and thats all there is too it. Get a regular groundman/waterboy that knows what to look for in the pattern and can handle the tooling. Handling multiple holder change outs by yourself is *&)*^&)*(. Get in the shop, tighten it all up best you can. The first day out will show you what you missed. Possible you get some of what you missed and by the weekend the drum might be a block or two at the most. Damage control takes patience and it can feel awful running the mill when its punching you back.
     
  16. dg330

    dg330 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2012
    Messages:
    6
    Occupation:
    Paving, Milling Foreman. ALDOT
    Location:
    Alabama
    Thanks for the advice milling drum. Im not able to have a groundman or waterboy. LOL. I have to watch mybown cut, make sure the machine is level, get my own water and all that jazz. When im not milling or get far enough ahead to stop, I have to run back to the paver and make sure they are ok. Anyway. Rumor has it they have bought a new Volvo MT2000. No one knows anything about milling machines where I work, and they wont take extra time to learn about them. I didn't know anything about warming the drives untill I read it here. Shoot they hammered theeth in with a hammer untill i read where your not suppose to. I just wish I worked with and for people that had pride in what they do.
     
  17. milling_drum

    milling_drum Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    asphalt mill operator (ret)
    Location:
    out west lately
    No problem, personally I hate seeing and reading about such things after the amount of times I've been through it and find your situation interesting being a state run crew. Traditionally and to this day mill subs have to get as much square yardage as possible daily or they lose money. If the drum condition is a problem it would be handled at nite after the day is done no matter how long it took and be ready to run the next morning no matter what. Funny the state isn't investing the time and/or money into taking care of such costly purchases but knowing how private sector management is means its boiled over into public works as well.

    You won't hear much of that warning the drives up stuff from others, alot of people in the business think thats stupid. I've had disagreements on that topic more then once with a foreman and quite always lost the arguement until the new drive belt is being replaced and the office wondering why it went out when in fact the average life span of the belt is much longer then the time it lasted. Little things like that keep the mill running longer with lower overall costs. If they don't care about paying to replace prematurely worn out items, run it anyway you want. No point in helping them if they don't want to help themselves. Wirtgen sure won't tell you warming the drives up is a good idea, that idea comes from common sense and experience which not many appreciate. The only people that would even remotely agree with that idea are people that have been milling 20+ years, back then it was hard to get parts and you were usually days away from the shop without a replacement. In your case you might be able to keep as many spares as needed at all times and have a shop mechanic put it on...

    Funny about Volvo, Last month I was in Cali and the company I was with had one as a demo and wouldnt have anything to do with it. I hear they are good mills, more of a utility machine then anything else but I saw a video where they will keep up with a wirtgen and roadtec of the same displacement on horsepower. Very different setup then the others. Please let us know how its going with it.
     
  18. andoman

    andoman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2009
    Messages:
    236
    Location:
    midwest
    Anyone have experience with Bomag 2000's? We're looking at getting a bit heavier into the milling side of things and I'm trying to whittle down the manufacturers to entertain. I'm looking at writgen, roadtec, and we're looking for a third. Terex is out since they don't have much support up here in michigan, and Cat is out since their support is garbage after Michigan Cat got bought out (and even the guys that work there tell you not to buy a Cat mill). Not sure if I should look at Volvo, bomag, or dynapac???
     
  19. milling_drum

    milling_drum Senior Member

    Joined:
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    724
    Occupation:
    asphalt mill operator (ret)
    Location:
    out west lately
    Ando, I'd demo one while you have a job where you have to cut 4+ inches deep and see how fast it can go. You know the spec on the others pretty much from all the weeping and wailing around here. The Bomagg is a good all purpose mill, I have pictures of one from last summer while in Ohio, that thing looked like it would tolerate about anything. The fellas running it didnt know squat about milling and were doing a decent job. They were grade trimming, the head was most likely trashed and couldnt be used to mill with. Wish I could remember the nme for ya.
     
  20. andoman

    andoman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2009
    Messages:
    236
    Location:
    midwest
    Yeah, we demo'd a Bomag 1300 last year and we were impressed with its simplicity, but I haven't heard if they're throw away type equipment or not (ie 5000 hrs and done type equipment). I guess the Thing that scares me about Bomag is the mini mill we demo'd sucked donkey nads. I'm leaning toward a w200 but I have to see what the prices are these days.