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Fancy Low Rider Log Trucks

Discussion in 'Forestry Operations' started by Birken Vogt, Aug 1, 2018.

  1. dieseldog5.9

    dieseldog5.9 Senior Member

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    Lots of talk about fancy trucks but so few pictures!
     
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  2. 92U 3406

    92U 3406 Senior Member

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    Before logging went to #### in 2008 in BC quite a few guys would run nice, new iron. Maybe not fancy custom paint jobs (hard to justify when you trade them in on a brand new one every 4-5 years) but a fair amount of chrome and some chicken lights.

    Can't believe anybody would consider running lo-pro tires on a logging truck. Just sounds like a horrible idea. You're in diff deep mud 3 months a year as is.
     
  3. Birken Vogt

    Birken Vogt Charter Member

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    I wish I had some pictures, have not seen as many this year as when I posted it. But I am not quick on the draw with my camera. They look a lot like the same style as hay haulers and such, tires not so low-pro and suspensions not as low, for obvious reasons.

    But a far cry from the old days of everything painted and fading and tires as tall as you could get.

    Here in California, for the most part logging only gets done when the roads are dry and dusty. When it rains it turns to slop and everybody goes home for the winter.
     
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  4. dieseldog5.9

    dieseldog5.9 Senior Member

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    Spent some time northern Northern California this summer, broke down in Willits, spent the night in the Napa parking lot for an alternator. Made the ride over route 20 to fort bragg and then up the coast cutting west in Humbolt over the mountain to Petrolia what a ride! Guys there can drive, had 2 log trucks come up behind me in the hills out of no where, i pulled over for them to pass and i couldn't keep up then they shot off the road into the woods like they where shot out of a cannon, amazing driving.

    But people there know how to drive, lead follow or get out of the way, people that are slow pull over and the faster guy gives you a wave to say thanks, driving fast and you come up on a slow car they pull over and give you a wave, nothing like driving on the east coast. Out here if your to fast you get the finger, to slow and pull over you get the finger, pretty much you are getting the finger, or giving it i guess.
     
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  5. Raildudes dad

    Raildudes dad Senior Member

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    I had the same experience in West VA. Two log trucks, I pulled over and let them pass. I tried to stay up with them, couldn't do it and feel safe.
     
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  6. RZucker

    RZucker Senior Member

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    Used to run I-90 westbound over Snoqualmie summit every day, going down I would get in the far right lane and ride the gears down easy. The log trucks jumping on at the summit would get in the far left lane and leave a trail of black smoke going down. I guess if you do it 6 times a day... ;)
     
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  7. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    When I lived in Ellensburg I knew lots of L drivers, I rode along several trips during winter logging. You use to find on Cummins powered loggers with non anroid pumps, A pair of
    vice grips on the return line and the pump would be shimmed to 2,400 rpm or there about, but it caused the engine rpm to fall slow so a short jake burst was used to drop rpm
    to speed up the shift.
     
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  8. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    I was sent to a Cummins school one year while working for the Komatsu dealer. I asked the instructor about that. He said he liked people who did that as it made for lots of work for their people. He wouldn't say what kind of damage it caused. At the time I thought is was pretty normal as a Cummins engine was always slow to decal after you took your foot off the pedal.
     
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  9. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    The damage was holes burned through pistons, plus broken cranks or bad cam shaft wear. Any of them that were shimmed-the bottom rod bearings looked as bad as the top bearing from the high rpm
    constantly yanking the pistons downward.
     
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  10. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Can't say logging near here is as good paying. Most of the boys here are cutting Walnut(Furniture/veneer grade), Cherry and White Oak(barrels), a few are cutting massive amounts of Red Cedar for Chips and shavings(Mulch or animal bedding), trucks are a Hodge Podge of extended frames, conversions of old Road tractors, absolute epitome of crap trailers with some form of bunks on them and haul short distances. Running gear is kept up as are brakes and tires but sheet metal is let go to Iron or Bauxite Termites.
     
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  11. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Had to take Engine Failure examination courses with Cummins and Detroit years ago with Gelco Leasing, learned a great deal as to wear indicators, piston failure points and progression, even with catastrophic failures whether were materials or modification or poor operational skill causes.
     
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  12. Paystar

    Paystar Well-Known Member

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    I laugh every time I see these guys with stretched Pete's and their "750 h.p. programs" going logging around here. They last a couple months and are in the shop broke and blown up.

    Here's a real log truck in northern Ontario. Twin steer, tri-drive, DD16 600/2050. 022.jpg
     
  13. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    The logging industry has changed so much, #1 is the payload-you just can't run a puny piece of equipment. The only thing about using DD15-16's and I work on a lot of them is
    those engines can and do have cylinder head issues, but that said anymore there isn't a diesel out there that doesn't have issues at one level or another. People always bring
    up that Cat engines are so expensive, well they haven't been around the high dollar DD15-16 engines. Depending on the style of water pump it can run as high as 1,000 and is
    about what you would find in a car.

    Nice looking equipment can be run in the woods but it's not a place for pansy {look at me} equipment either.
     
  14. Paystar

    Paystar Well-Known Member

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    Everybody wishes they still had a pre-emission Cat. But thanks to the gov, those days are gone now.

    So far I have had better luck with Detroit than Cummins. I have had emission system issues with both, but so far the only hard parts on the Detroits is the fan belt tensioner and idlers. Cummins have been injectors, fuel pumps, air compressors, ERG valves and coolers, thermostats. Same mileage on both doing same job.

    But like you saidTtruck Shop, I never complained about the price of Cat, because I got return on investment. And minimal downtime because they always had parts overnight at most.
     
  15. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Detroit was first with electronic control engines
    Suspect they had their bugs worked out first
    Not been around too many engines of later trucks, one dying ISX Cummins and a ancient 3406E that both had aged issues.
    Have paid attention to the complaints and costs increases DD seems to retain the better bargain even as expensive.
     
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  16. Paystar

    Paystar Well-Known Member

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    The costs nowadays really doesn't matter anyway, because you CANNOT keep them past warranty. We tried going one extra year to 6 years with our ISX and DD15's and it ended up costing $11,000 to $30,000 in emission system repairs and replacement.

    Name of the game now is extended warranty and dump them at 5 years. It's pretty sad.
     
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  17. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    See that here with the Local Truck Lines, nothing older than 6 years, defined by warranty. Dealers are sitting on a lot of used machines No Buyers so go to wholesale and trade in pricing beginning to show that.
     
  18. check

    check Senior Member

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    Loggers around here are barely getting by, I haven't seen any pretty modified rigs yet. But there are suckers who read magazines in every walk of life so it's just a matter of time before some fool decides to "make a statement" by conforming to the fashion police. Personally, I associate low profile tires to low intellect. I wouldn't be caught dead driving a vehicle with tires that have an aspect ratio of less than 75.
     
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  19. Hank R

    Hank R Senior Member

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    Paystar your trucks looks pretty sharp beside the logger.
     
  20. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    On Over the road rigs anyone who isn't running 295/75 22.5 tires is just adding extra weight, almost 20 lbs difference per tire, besides the fact you lose one those are everywhere.
    And yes there is the warranty factor, our last 20 came with a 750,000 mile warranty on drive train. The 1 box is the killer part of emissions $10,000 to replace but if you buy the
    warranty on the emissions-it's covered. The company is turning them over around 500,000, easier to trade with some warranty left. But because of recalls and constant issues
    the next five are going to be W990's with 525 hp 1850 torque Cummins and 13spds with disc on steer and drum brakes on drive and lift axle.

    With the truck manufactures anymore it's not what you as a buyer want or need, It's all about the manufacture because they think they know what you want and need.
    Just remember when buying a truck or talking to a service representative they know better than you because they are farting through $125.00 pants, and your Wranglers only cost $39.99.
    I only have 4 years to retirement, I've only been a mechanic for 46 years and I already want out!
     
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