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Ever blade backwards?

Discussion in 'Motor Graders' started by Fat Dan, Jan 30, 2020.

  1. ovrszd

    ovrszd Senior Member

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    Got it. Deere calls that the "Saddle Lock Pin".

    I thought you had to physically remove a pin. Couldn't figure that one out. :rolleyes:
     
  2. ovrszd

    ovrszd Senior Member

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    I move my blade into the banking position frequently. Just did it couple days ago to use the moldboard to move drifted snow farther off the shoulder of the road.

    I change my cutting edges in the bank position.

    Starting with the nuts up. Remove all but the center one on each cutter. Then step back and remove the last one letting the cutter fall on the ground.

    Then I swap my blade with the face of the moldboard up, nuts down. This gives me a ledge to lay the cutter on and get the first bolt in.

    I swap my cutters frequently, maybe a dozen times in a set's life. I can put my blade in that position in one minute or so. Never timed it exactly. Doesn't take very long.
     
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  3. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    To put this all in perspective, trying to grade in reverse is a waste of time and risks damage to the machine just turning the blade by inexperienced operators. Running in reverse also means you have to reverse your thoughts on operating the controls. Anyone who has run a grader knows it takes time just to learn the controls going forward. So which way do you move the lever to change the angle of attack while moving in reverse. It's not intuitive and you will never do it enough to make it intuitive.

    Experienced operators don't need to think about turning the blade. They make the right pass the first time. My original statement about someone operating a grader on my site or roads in reverse would get moved to another machine or get sent down the road I would guess it is true of most all operations. Its a waste of production time, fuel and puts the grader at risk of damage that didn't need to happen. Just because someone says it can be done doesn't mean it's a good idea.
     
    Jonas302 likes this.
  4. cuttin edge

    cuttin edge Senior Member

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    That's pretty much how we change edges as well. I also use that position to square them up with the cutting torch. Like I say, if someone wants to grade in reverse, giver. I have no idea who Randy is. I did read the material though.
     
  5. DB2

    DB2 Senior Member

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    Ovrszd what size of blades are you using ?

    On our 160M I’m at 8 by 1 x 8 feet. The best tip I’ve gotten on here is to slice them in half through the center bolt hole to make them manageable.
    I do bolster the ends so they aren’t really swappable from side to side.

    The good operator’s wear them straight across. The steering wheel attendants not so much. 9BEF58B8-073A-4092-8625-BA88B74BEAD5.png
     
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  6. 20/80

    20/80 Senior Member

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    Ok, what is this, I see the straight blade but what do you have welded on them and why? also do you have a picture of them on your machine just to get a better idea? never seen this done like the way you have them, interesting. thanks
     
  7. DB2

    DB2 Senior Member

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    The end of the blades catch hell on the roll type curbs. I’ll be at the shop later and post some more pictures of some on the machines and what happens when you don't put anything. For now here is a picture of my grader fleet for this current winter. 2E21A477-40A5-4246-8EBE-9981BA013A18.png

    I could spend all summer repairing corners of moldboards lol
     
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  8. DB2

    DB2 Senior Member

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    Sorry I just keep using the old thin edges to beef up the new ones. I spend maybe an hour on each side but it makes all the difference. Some guys weld pin etc I just have found this works best as there is always old blades about. A picture of our Deere for Ovrszd. I’ll remember to get those shots of the crappy paint quality later as well. My man painted the board here as it was just new to us.
    EAE8A166-F49D-4387-B067-9354A9EDC5AF.png
     
    ovrszd likes this.
  9. ovrszd

    ovrszd Senior Member

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    My Moldboard is 14ft. I use 8"x3/4"x7' cutting edges.

    When they are new and for the first 3-4 swaps, it's a bit of struggle to lift them in place and get that first bolt started. I couldn't handle yours by myself.

    As to controlling wear, I even run on the wrong side of the road blading once in awhile to distribute the wear.

    Thanks for the pic of the 770G, looks just like the one we traded last Summer, minus fenders. :)
     
  10. ovrszd

    ovrszd Senior Member

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    One time I've cut a set of edges straight. Was running on frozen roadbeds recovering gravel from the shoulders. Waited too long between swaps.

    Randy used to post on here a lot. I really enjoyed following his adventures. Especially when he was running the Ice Roads up North.
     
    DB2 likes this.
  11. DB2

    DB2 Senior Member

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    Yes most of ours our 14 feet as well. I lop a foot of one end and then cut the remainder in half. Much easier to handle. I’m actually thinking of switching to 1 x 10. Theoretically should last longer. There’s a pretty significant savings if I buy a 100 at a time as well.

    Yes Randy was/is the Cat grader guru. I wonder if any of the other manufacturers have had operators like him on staff ?
     
  12. 72hayes

    72hayes Well-Known Member

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    i remember 40 years ago Emil Anderson Construction was rebuilding a 2 lane highway. After paving one lane
    they would move the traffic over and then have to tightblade the other lane. On one stretch there was no room
    to turn the 14E so the Grader operator did one pass forward, one with the blade reversed, then a final pass forward.
    This was more than a mile long. the truck drivers joked that he didn't need the third pass he was so good in reverse.
     
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  13. tinnerjohn

    tinnerjohn Member

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    I've been thinking and trying to visualize grading in reverse since this thread started and all I can think is how coordinated you would have to be to maintain a crown, watch the blade and all the other things you need to do while either standing facing the back of the machine or watching the road in the mirrors. My hat is off to all the great "bladehands" who built and maintained roads, especially before hydraulics and electronics to make the operation a little easier. John
     
  14. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    It's amazing what good operators and a little ingenuity can do.
     
  15. tinnerjohn

    tinnerjohn Member

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    When I was a kid our township had one, as well as some neighboring townships. I wish I could reincarnate even one of them. I hope to come close enough to their ability to be remembered like they are! John
     
  16. ovrszd

    ovrszd Senior Member

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    I back drag away from bridges or when finishing a new culvert install. Most important thing for me is to use the articulation rather than the steering wheel for lateral correction. Just about the time I think I'm good at it, I'll prove I'm not so much.....
     
  17. tinnerjohn

    tinnerjohn Member

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    [QUOTE="ovrszd, post: 866221, member: 4745" Just about the time I think I'm good at it, I'll prove I'm not so much.....[/QUOTE]
    Please don't rock that boat too much ovrszd, I don't swim well! John
     
  18. 20/80

    20/80 Senior Member

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    That is a nice fleet of graders, you most have lots of headache's, I see now what you have made and what they are for, we have a metal curb protector that bolts to our plows and wings that does the very same thing you have on your mouldboards, our graders are pretty much on the back gravel roads only, our truck plows/salt trucks do in town and highways and some times help with the back roads, we don't need them on our Graders. thanks for the pics
     
  19. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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  20. ovrszd

    ovrszd Senior Member

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    I learn new techniques all the time. I also think as I age my reaction times and vision change. So I have to alter the way I do things to get the result I expect. Running a Blade is very evolutionary. When an Operator can't adapt he needs to be removed.

    It's my job to do the best I can to produce the roads my Board of Directors desire. It's their job to remove me when I can no longer do that. I don't want my legacy to be the Operator that stayed too long.