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EIMCO 911B

Discussion in 'Compact Wheel Loaders' started by HardRockNM, Jan 26, 2020.

  1. HardRockNM

    HardRockNM Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2020
    Messages:
    19
    Occupation:
    Miner
    Location:
    New Mexico
    [​IMG]

    This one could go equally well in the compact wheel loader or mining subforums, I guess. I picked up an EIMCO 911B for $9k today from the original owner. She's got 11(!!!!) hours on the meter, and just needs a new tire, fire extinguisher, lighting, and a ROPS/FOPS canopy to be 100% MSHA-legal and mine ready.

    For those not familiar with them, the 911B has a Deutz F4L912W and a hydrostatic drive. 10,000lb operating weight with 5,000lb ROC. They're little powerhouses.
     
  2. barrelroll

    barrelroll Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2016
    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    Colorado
    That's a cool little machine.

    I've never seen one of them before. Any idea why it has froward instead of side seating? I've never seen an LHD with a seating position like that. I'm by no means a good operator but spend 2-3 months a year in an LHD and feel like i'd be in the rib all the time with that machine. Even backing a skid steer up by mirror for a couple hundred feet in a 10x10 drift with utilities hanging on the rib is no fun.

    What's your plan for it?
     
    HardRockNM likes this.
  3. HardRockNM

    HardRockNM Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2020
    Messages:
    19
    Occupation:
    Miner
    Location:
    New Mexico
    It's a strange arrangement on an LHD for sure. The only other front-seated LHDs I can recall off the top of my head are made by Aramine. This seller also has an EIMCO 921, a newer design that's kin to an EJC 60D or Sandvik LH202 and has a side/transverse seat. I would have bought it but the price was outside my budget.

    Rear visibility is surprisingly quite good on this machine thanks to the low engine deck height, and the steering is very precise. I ran it in reverse around their yard for a while without an issue before making an offer. I'm not a stranger to running CAT 980Gs in narrow cuts and skid-steers in plants, so this little EIMCO is a cakewalk. Just have to get used to turning in my seat!

    The plan is to initially put this machine to work as a rental supporting a crushing plant for a month or two. The customer has an operating conventional/rail mine, and plans to dewater and reopen a rubber-tire mine in the same district this spring. At that point in time, I'll mob the 911 over there to support exploration and development, which may be at least partially contracted to my (startup) company. If I get my way, we'll pick up an Atlas Copco ST2D/G/whatever as a primary production machine and use the EIMCO as a cleanup machine, forklift, narrow exploration header machine, road clearer, and whatever other uses come to mind. There's an EIMCO 912 (see below) available in the area for a reasonable amount, but that machine doesn't inspire a ton of confidence.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    The 921. Its user interface is a bit more modern (pushbutton SAHR parking brake, stick vs. wheel steering) but still uses direct-acting levers. There's a learning curve coming off of front-end loaders, but the potential on this machine is obvious after running it.

    What sort of LHDs do you typically operate?
     
  4. barrelroll

    barrelroll Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2016
    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    Colorado
    That sounds like a fun project, down in New Mexico I'm guessing?

    You have to love stuff that comes out of a mine, it could have 6 hours on it and look like it's been through the war. We just got a bunch of new 1700's, I'm wondering how long till they turn mine black/ brown instead of cat yellow.

    I usually run a Cat R1600G mucking out 1,700' long drifts full of mud, it's around a mile tram round trip. Our production crew runs 1700G's
     
    HardRockNM likes this.
  5. HardRockNM

    HardRockNM Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2020
    Messages:
    19
    Occupation:
    Miner
    Location:
    New Mexico
    Yup, it's in New Mexico.

    Underground equipment is funny that way. I've seen guys describe a skid-steer as "trashed" because of a few scratches and a bent auxiliary port bracket - those guys would faint if they saw anything that's been underground for any length of time.

    Those CATs are some big machines! A mile-long tram would have me grumbling at whatever engineer thought that was efficient.
     
  6. HardRockNM

    HardRockNM Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2020
    Messages:
    19
    Occupation:
    Miner
    Location:
    New Mexico
    [​IMG]

    Well, I took delivery of the 911B this Saturday. Unloading it was a pretty miserable affair...rainy, muddy, 35 degrees, and the 55-ton crane's battery was bad. It took about two hours of running around for tools, chargers, and rigging before the LHDs could be picked.

    My machine has a bad tire - torn up but will hold air enough to tram a bit, the replacement has been purchased along with a spare. It will also require adjusting the parking brake for full engagement (clevises on the lever can be used to adjust it, hopefully won't be too difficult), and some minor things (fire extinguisher, light and horn wiring). I'd also like to put a set of rock penetration teeth on it for digging ore.

    The machine behind it is property of my company, the co-owner and I split the cost ($4k). The seller said the engine was seized, but I'm not so sure about that - the way it behaved when I tried to crank it has me questioning the starter or solenoid, which would be infinitely better to fix. Since it has a USBM approval tag rather than a MESA or MSHA tag, it's a 1972 or earlier, with a three-cylinder Deutz. Serial is 0280, if there are any EIMCO geeks around here who could date it. I anticipate that machine requiring all new tires and almost all new hoses, a fuel shutoff cable, exhaust, lights, and more.

    We also snagged an Ingersoll-Rand slusher complete with a bucket and cable; a mine supply house quoted $11k for an equivalent setup. This whole lot of equipment ran $16.5k!
     
  7. HardRockNM

    HardRockNM Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2020
    Messages:
    19
    Occupation:
    Miner
    Location:
    New Mexico
    20200725_140405.jpg
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    Just to update: we did a lot of work on the 911B including all new fluids and filters, a new set of tires, LED headlights, and brake work. Our customer reopened their rubber-tire mine and is mining above the water level (dewatering will begin soon); my machine is on rent with them. They've got an EIMCO 913 as their main production machine, but it's not a good fit due to size.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2020
    Paul Council and DB2 like this.